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One ski town for the rest of your life? - Page 5

post #121 of 180

Did not mean to questions anyone's virility, I just think folks like Sib and Tony and Kneale are in the 1%. Maybe I am too. There were 43 days last year I could have skied. I went to church once, the airport twice (probably the three prettiest days of the year) and skied the other 40 but a lot of folks I skied with would take off every Sunday for church, snowshoe a little and go to town one day and cross country (competitive) at least two days leaving about three days a week to ski. The cross country fans really liked that because they tell me the heavy snow days are the worst on skinny skis and visa-versa so they had "good conditions" almost every day. That's why I said that MOST folks who live in a ski town can pick their days and get in a lot of skiing even in a light snow year like 2012.

post #122 of 180

But the OP and all the others here want to move to a ski town and they post on Epic, they are not people who ended up in a ski town, mostly golf, and sometimes ski.  I have a ton of neighbors who moved here for other reasons or come from here.  They may ski a few days a year, but they didn't move here specifically because of the skiing.  I took two Ladies Day classes and most of those women only skied on Ladies Day.  But that category didn't MOVE HERE to ski.  

post #123 of 180

The nicest thing about living in a ski town.  You don't have to kill it everyday!

post #124 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveturner View Post

Knee deep snow every day is overated for the  uh, mature, skiier moving to the snow country. When you live there you can't ski every day anyway unless you are in your 20s or 30s and even then there are other things you will prefer doing some times. Most of the west has plenty of good fresh snow days to keep you busy between breaks so all the snow data is probably of more importatnce to the vacationer and the <1% hard core.


Not sure what this had to do with my post about Park City having good powder, but your assumptions are clearly wrong, as has been spelled out above. Access to the best conditions is kind of a big reason for moving to a ski town for anyone, and it's not like any resort has powder days every day of the season - getting a lot of powder just increases your chances of having prime conditions when you are out there. I'd imagine most of the folks retiring to a ski town, which kind of runs counter to more traditional retirement, are in the 1 %, too.

post #125 of 180
Quote:
Knee deep snow every day is overrated for the  uh, mature, skier moving to the snow country.

Actually not.  Once you've put in the time, untracked powder is probably easier on the body than anything but a smooth groomer with soft packed powder (also more likely in places that get a lot of snow) or perfect ripe corn.  There are lots of people in their 50's and 60's at the snowcat places in Canada and a few in their 70's.  It's hardpack and sometimes moguls that put stress on the joints.

 

FYI that consistent comfort level in powder did not come for me until I bought fat skis and started the snowcat skiing at age 44.  Last season at age 59 I skied 50% more powder than any other season in my life.  About half of that was 12 days of cat skiing, but there were also great powder days at the Gathering in Tahoe, Utah in March and Mammoth in April.

 

Quote:
I just think folks like Sib and Tony and Kneale are in the 1%

Most people who know me wouldROTF.gifat that comment, as I did not even start skiing until age 25 and have been told by a few people that my technique reflects that.   I know a couple of people who were more casual intermediates before they retired to Salt Lake City and their skiing improvement has been quite dramatic.  You go from 10-15 days a year up to 50+ on bigger mountains/better snow and you'll be pleasantly surprised.

 

Quote:

getting a lot of powder just increases your chances of having prime conditions when you are out there. I'd imagine most of the folks retiring to a ski town, which kind of runs counter to more traditional retirement, are in the 1 %, too.

 

My observation is that many of the people who move to these places become "powder snobs," cherry picking their ski days for the very best conditions.  I'm too addicted to take that restrictive an attitude.

post #126 of 180

One Ski Town for the rest of my life would have to be Chamonix!!

As other factors come into play you may want to back it off a bit. Truth be told we moved to VT (Montpelier Area) and love it so far. We like the east coast and still plan to travel for vacations.

 

 

A Blizzard of Aahhhs day dream come true!

 

700


Edited by Skidmarks - 7/30/12 at 8:01pm
post #127 of 180

Made that choice a few years back - it's called Chamonix - it's and international town in which some French people live - there are many in the international community, including many from the USA who came here once on holiday and decided they could either do their job by fax/phone/computer or their job wasn't worth going back to and stayed - some of those folks cam3 back in the 70's but every year someone does the same. Yes it's easy for me to do 'cause I'm from the UK, but I don't know anyone who really wanted to stay who hasn't found a way of staying..

.....mind you for the cost of a modest Ranch (not ranch style house) out west (USA west) you will get a small apartment here!

post #128 of 180

I did not make it through all the responses, so I apologize if this is a repeat. Do you want to have different resorts to choose from?  That is something that is so wonderful about park City.  Three resorts within five minutes of my house, and when you include Snowbasin, five more within 45 minutes.....

 

Truckee/Tahoe also met that criteria for me, but it was more expensive than Park City, and was more remote than Park City, so I moved to PC 9 years ago from Virginia, and it was one of the best decisions of my life.  And just a thought...someone commented on the fact that Park City's skiing is a little more mellow than other ski towns.  Isn't that a good thing when you are older?  Best of luck!

post #129 of 180

I got one you can check off your list because it doesn't qualify.  Fresno, CA.

 

If I had to pick an appropriate retirement zone right now, I'd go for Whitefish, MT or Coeur d' alene, ID

post #130 of 180

As much as people here dont want to share our little secret, Boise Idaho is a good one. skiing 20 minutes from town. Sun Valley and Brundage mountain are bot about 2.5 hours away depending on conditions. Utah is 6 hrs tahoe is 6-8 depending on weather and traffic, Jackson hole, Targhee, and a whole bunch of other resorts are just a hop skip and a jump away. 

 

Check this out for a local resort

http://www.onthesnow.com/idaho/bogus-basin/profile.html

post #131 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mighty Matt View Post

As much as people here dont want to share our little secret, Boise Idaho is a good one. skiing 20 minutes from town. Sun Valley and Brundage mountain are bot about 2.5 hours away depending on conditions. Utah is 6 hrs tahoe is 6-8 depending on weather and traffic, Jackson hole, Targhee, and a whole bunch of other resorts are just a hop skip and a jump away. 

 

Check this out for a local resort

http://www.onthesnow.com/idaho/bogus-basin/profile.html

You're lucky, if it's not PC, SLC, Summit County, somewhere in Montana, or Tahoe nobody wants to hear about it and you will not be taken seriously.

post #132 of 180
post #133 of 180

I reluctantly give my thumbs up to Bozeman, having lived there for nearly 8 years.  I say reluctantly, as it's growing fast, which always changes things and it would be nice to see the growth slow down a bit.  I now live in southern Vermont and love it but the taxes are outrageous and many folks are moving out because it's just too expensive to live here.  And it is bone-chillin' cold...I know...I'm out in it almost every day in the winter.  The summers are glorious, however.

 

Now for the kicker.....I plan to move back to Bozeman as soon as I turn 65 (good ol' medicare kicks in).  I'd be there now, if I could, just not possible at this time.  I go back there and have a hard time getting on the plane to fly back East.  Bridger Bowl is such a great ski area, and if you want the bigger resort experience, Big Sky is just down the road and there are NO LIFTLINES...EVER!!  Bozeman as much to offer, culturally, outdoors activities, good hospital, only drawback is it's harder to get there, have to change planes at least once, unless you're flying from a major western city.  But it's great because it is an actual town, with Montana State U. and not a resort, which is a lot different living-wise than a town...been there done that. That's why we chose Bozeman to begin with.  Also, in Utah, you will feel the mormon presence, from what I've been told. 

post #134 of 180

Everyone has made suggestions that sound appealing.  This is to me an interesting theoretical discussion.  I find myself torn between wanting to retire someplace (or for that matter, move there now instead of waiting 20 years) that's in or near a ski town, versus having the benefits of where I am now (about 45 minutes to an hour north of Seattle).

 

I'd like to ski 80+ days a season, without having to drive the 1 1/2-to-2 hours I drive now.  Under 30 minutes would be great. 

 

OTOH, the PNW tends to have consistent snowfall; one of the longest lift-serviced ski seasons is at Crystal Mt. (my last ski day was 7/1/12), so that's a reason to stay put, despite the snow not being the lighter, drier stuff most of the time. 

 

As far as other resorts, I'm 4 hours from Whistler, 5 hours from Kamloops (Sun Peaks) or Sandpoint (Schweitzer) , 8 hours from Revelstoke and other points in the BC interior.  I can hop on Amtrak (the station in a half hour from where I live) and be in Sandpoint or Whitefish overnight.

 

But no, I'm greedy, I want a ski playground in my backyard.   I'll let you know within the next 20 years what I decide to do. confused.gif

post #135 of 180

JaPOW looks nice, 

post #136 of 180
I came to a similar conclusion regarding Park City. My criteria included:
- # of sunny days
- quality of available health care system
- cultural opportunities ( symphony, theater, architecture, colleges)
- taxes
- cost of housing
- and of course, quality/quanity of local skiing

With that criteria in mind, I checked out:
- Burlington, VT ( negative - high # of cloudy days)
- Sante Fe, NM ( beautiful area, housing expensive in town, skiing nearby not bad)
-Stowe, Vt - beautiful area with good east coast skiing but limited and expensive housing stock
- Edwards, CO - Beaver Creek and Vail would be my home ski areas with numerous other options nearby as well as Denver only 1.5 hours away. However, homes in my price range were poor quality
-Laurel Mountains, Pa - I included this option because I already own a house there. I would have 5 local ski areas to ski, Pittsburgh is only one hour away and my home in Baltimore is 3 hours away, thus good access to family. However, as we already know, skiing here is not the best. Housing is cheap, but low # of sunny days compared to out west.
-Park City, UT - amazing skiing and outdoor opportunities; Salt Lake City cultural institutions nearby as well as great medical facilities. Park City can be expensive but I was surprised to find many housing choices in price ranges similar to the Baltimore area. Excellent weather although a bit dry for us east coasters. Also a long way to family.

Park City became the clear leader. However, I have not yet retired and I still need to convince my wife to move 2000 miles from her family home.

Best of luck with your decision.
post #137 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slide man View Post

I came to a similar conclusion regarding Park City. My criteria included:
- # of sunny days
- quality of available health care system
- cultural opportunities ( symphony, theater, architecture, colleges)
- taxes
- cost of housing
- and of course, quality/quanity of local skiing
With that criteria in mind, I checked out:
- Burlington, VT ( negative - high # of cloudy days)
- Sante Fe, NM ( beautiful area, housing expensive in town, skiing nearby not bad)
-Stowe, Vt - beautiful area with good east coast skiing but limited and expensive housing stock
- Edwards, CO - Beaver Creek and Vail would be my home ski areas with numerous other options nearby as well as Denver only 1.5 hours away. However, homes in my price range were poor quality
-Laurel Mountains, Pa - I included this option because I already own a house there. I would have 5 local ski areas to ski, Pittsburgh is only one hour away and my home in Baltimore is 3 hours away, thus good access to family. However, as we already know, skiing here is not the best. Housing is cheap, but low # of sunny days compared to out west.
-Park City, UT - amazing skiing and outdoor opportunities; Salt Lake City cultural institutions nearby as well as great medical facilities. Park City can be expensive but I was surprised to find many housing choices in price ranges similar to the Baltimore area. Excellent weather although a bit dry for us east coasters. Also a long way to family.
Park City became the clear leader. However, I have not yet retired and I still need to convince my wife to move 2000 miles from her family home.
Best of luck with your decision.


I have to "unretire" and work for hopefully another 15 years, and am considering Park City for yet another reason: Very good schools.  I lived in Vail before, and it is wonderful but over my budget at the moment.

post #138 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tervizeks View Post


Milan is the best. Close to so many great places like the Dalmatian coast, the Alps, etc., and it's easier to get around in than Rome with just as much to do and see in the city.

Well, I wouldn't go that far. Now, if that tram ran all the way to the hill...

post #139 of 180

My vote would be for Buena Vista, Colorado.  Situated right in the middle of Colorado with skiing options that allow for both the northern and southern approaches of storms.  Not per se a ski town it is close enough to North-South/East-West main roads that getting where the light and dry is falling is fairly easy.  It is also just far enough away from the main artery through the hills (Highway 285) that people seem to forget about it.  The views cannot be beat anywhere although, I guess you could call me a homer.  The town is small, with award winning schools for the kiddos, and the amount of sunshine sitting in the banana belt allows for 24" powder days followed by BBQs on the deck in shadows of 14,000 foot peaks.  The summer activities include rafting, fishing, boating on nearby lakes, or just plain letting the kids safely ride around a beautiful community that is safe.  My wife and I have traveled to several of the mentioned locations listed in this post and wished we would have just listened to our hearts from the get go.  I would not mention this place on anything other than a skiing website, for fellow skiers, but that is exactly what this is.  This post, of all posts, has spanned several years and should be recommended reading for anybody wanting to relocate to an area that will provide better mental health for them and their family.  Do I think that this post will cause an influx of people to a place I love?  I think we all make our decisions based upon criteria that is very much different from person to person or family to family and you can't go wrong with any of the suggestions listed.     

post #140 of 180

Knox Williams, who was in charge of the Colorado Avalanche Information Center and supplied me with most of my snow data when I was getting started 20 years ago, retired to Buena Vista.

post #141 of 180
Quote:
Also, in Utah, you will feel the mormon presence, from what I've been told.

Much exaggerated from the numerous  Utah locals I know.  SLC is slightly less than half Mormon and Park City far less than that.   Rural Utah and eastern Idaho are the places that are heavy majority Mormon.

post #142 of 180

For me, it has to be Steamboat Springs, CO...

 

500+ inches of snow at Buffalo Pass and numerous backcountry areas.

Phenomenal trees at the resort. 

Great summer recreation opportunities.

Away from the Denver weekend warriors, but still get to meet some cool folks flying in from out of town. 

Great vibe, although the "Billy Kidd riding horses to the lifts" theme is overdone...

 

Telluride would be a close second, but misses out due to the inconsistent snowfall. 

post #143 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post

Much exaggerated from the numerous  Utah locals I know.  SLC is slightly less than half Mormon and Park City far less than that.   Rural Utah and eastern Idaho are the places that are heavy majority Mormon.

What's the problem with Mormons, anywhay? It's not a reason to not move somewhere.   I know several Mormons, and my girlfriend's extended family in Utah has several people who are practicing Mormons, along with a few who aren't.  They are all genuinely nice people.  And most of them ski. 

post #144 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesiredUsername View Post

What's the problem with Mormons, anywhay? It's not a reason to not move somewhere.   I know several Mormons, and my girlfriend's extended family in Utah has several people who are practicing Mormons, along with a few who aren't.  They are all genuinely nice people.  And most of them ski. 

Agreed! I live in Boise and I have many co-workers and friends that are Mormons and there is no such thing as trying to influence you or make you a Mormon as well! People tend to imagine a situation like those small 2K people cities where everyone has a belief that differs from yours and want you to change in order to live there! This is not likely to happen on any reasonable city nowadays!

post #145 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesiredUsername View Post

What's the problem with Mormons, anywhay? It's not a reason to not move somewhere.   I know several Mormons, and my girlfriend's extended family in Utah has several people who are practicing Mormons, along with a few who aren't.  They are all genuinely nice people.  And most of them ski. 


+1

 

I've been calling Utah my home for 5 years now and have not once been approached to convert to LDS.  In fact, I have many friends and colleagues who are Mormon, and they are just really great people.

 

The added bonus is Sundays when they are all at church.

post #146 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeedToSki View Post


+1

 

I've been calling Utah my home for 5 years now and have not once been approached to convert to LDS.  In fact, I have many friends and colleagues who are Mormon, and they are just really great people.

 

The added bonus is Sundays when they are all at church.


All the Mormons I've met are nice, and I have no issues with them in general, but I'd consider yourself lucky if you haven't been propositioned. I've had them come knocking on my door multiple times, in two different homes. I really don't understand the whole doorbell religion thing.

post #147 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post


All the Mormons I've met are nice, and I have no issues with them in general, but I'd consider yourself lucky if you haven't been propositioned. I've had them come knocking on my door multiple times, in two different homes. I really don't understand the whole doorbell religion thing.

 

Well, I get that where I live in the PNW, too.  Pretty much anywhere you can find a pair of young men in white shirts and ties.  Sometimes a group will meet for lunch near where I work.

 

Not just Mormons, often Jehovah's Witnesses will make the rounds as well.

 

So, it seems the consensus is that it doesn't make much difference in whether to move to Utah for either retirement or employment close to skiing and/or snowboarding. 

 

But what should we do about the people who post that it is a negative?    Ridicule them for their intolerance of polite friendly people in white shirts and ties? Should we shun them?  Throw snowballs at them?  devil.gif Bwah ha ha.

post #148 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesiredUsername View Post

 

Well, I get that where I live in the PNW, too.  Pretty much anywhere you can find a pair of young men in white shirts and ties.  Sometimes a group will meet for lunch near where I work.

 

Not just Mormons, often Jehovah's Witnesses will make the rounds as well.

 

So, it seems the consensus is that it doesn't make much difference in whether to move to Utah for either retirement or employment close to skiing and/or snowboarding. 

 

But what should we do about the people who post that it is a negative?    Ridicule them for their intolerance of polite friendly people in white shirts and ties? Should we shun them?  Throw snowballs at them?  devil.gif Bwah ha ha.


Eh, I guess. I spent many years elsewhere and can't recall having that happen, and definitely not with the frequency it happens with here. Not a reason not to move here, but it may be a regular part of the routine. And it does get annoying.

post #149 of 180

Going to Utah and complaining about the Mormons, isn't that kind of like going to Italy and complaining about the Catholics?  They are good people by in large even the missionaries.  

 

I am not LDS but spent a lot of this past years in some very small Eastern Utah towns, one had 3 Methodists and 1200 Mormons.  Spent some interesting evenings discussing religion with some of their missionaries; they were cool. they knew I would not convert but they enjoyed sharing their religion with someone who was interested.  The kids behind the counter at McDonald's are pushier.  

 

Think about it, if you are complaining about their religion what does it say about yours?  Utah is cool and so are their people, if their religion is that big of a problem to you go ski the Bible Belt instead.  I thought most of us went to Utah for the skiing.

post #150 of 180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

Going to Utah and complaining about the Mormons, isn't that kind of like going to Italy and complaining about the Catholics?  They are good people by in large even the missionaries.  

 

I am not LDS but spent a lot of this past years in some very small Eastern Utah towns, one had 3 Methodists and 1200 Mormons.  Spent some interesting evenings discussing religion with some of their missionaries; they were cool. they knew I would not convert but they enjoyed sharing their religion with someone who was interested.  The kids behind the counter at McDonald's are pushier.  

 

Think about it, if you are complaining about their religion what does it say about yours?  Utah is cool and so are their people, if their religion is that big of a problem to you go ski the Bible Belt instead.  I thought most of us went to Utah for the skiing.


Not sure who was complaining about religion. I sure wasn't. Religion is fine. Soliciting on my front door, I could live without (religion or otherwise).

 

Feel free to drop your number; I'll be sure to hand it out and let the folks know you're interested.

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