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First identifiable ski club.

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 


The oldest ski club in the world was formed on this slope known as Township Hill, in Kiandra Australia. Originally named the "Kiandra Snow Shoe Club", today it’s name is the "Kiandra Pioneer Ski Club 1861" located in Perisher Valley.

It was on this mountain in 1908 that Charles Menger from Denver, USA was the winner of the first ever documented " International / Intercontinental Downhill Ski Event".
( See results below)


 


 

Letter of confirmation. 2006


 
 

 1904 LADIES DOWNHILL CHAMPIONSHIP TROPHY  ( JEWEL BOX LID)

Ladies

 

 1908
AMERICA WINS THE FIRST  DOCUMENTENTED 
INTERNATIONAL / INTERCONTINENTAL
  DOWNHILL CARNIVAL.

 

School of Arts, the club meeting place for the International Championship. 

Three club meeting places

Township Hill, Kiandra 1955.

Kiandra Club House 1955 -1966


 

1955-1966, U- shaped Clubhouse, high left of the Poplar trees, destroyed by fire 1969.







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post #2 of 10
Very cool! Welcome to Epicski and thanks for posting about your club. The first in US was the Alturas Ski Club founded in 1867, but I don't think it existed for very long.
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thankyou, for your welcome.

There is a lot to tell about this historic club, I am only too happy to answer any questions, for example here are a few interesting past members.

1898. Vice President, Mr. C.A. Falstadt, Consul General, Norway and Sweden.

1899. Patron, 7th Lord Earl Beauchamp KCMG. (William Lygon) Governor NSW.

1899. Vice Presidents and competitive skiers, Sir William Lyne, Premier NSW.

1899. Mr. Andrew Barton (Banjo) Paterson, poet and war correspondent.
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
In Lech, 1975, I met a man named Bob ----  from New York, he was demonstating a new retractable binding. I am interested to know if this is the same  "Burt Binding" in your photo display.

Bob had been to Lech several times, he drove myself and a friend named P----  O-----  to a duty free province nearby to purchase  a few gifts for our girls. As a group of six, we wined , dined, and skied.

 Did Bob go on  to market this binding as it would appear ? 

Edited by Skitalk - 7/23/2009 at 11:21 am GMT
post #5 of 10
1861 was apparently a big year for ski clubs.  In "Two Planks and a Passion", by Roland Huntford, he says, "Thus the organizer of the Trysil race was the 'Trysil Rifle and Skiing Club'.  It had been formed in 1861, with the aim of holding 'a ski run, with prizes' the next season."  That club was not a club only for skiing, though, so maybe that's how yours gets precedence?
post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 

The Trysil Rifle and Ski Club was formed in May 1861. At the announcement of the club, it was stated that a ski competition would be conducted on the first "Winterthing Day" if possible

The National library of Norway was contacted to describe "Winterthing day".

“The Swedes conducted Winterthings in January and February between 1600 and 1700. Trysil, being located on the border to Sweden may have adapted this custom.”

No evidence has been made available to support that this event actually happend.
 
The Kiandra Club was formed in 1860 with newspapers reporting "scores" of people skiing in August 1861. 

post #7 of 10
 There was a ski race on January 22, 1862 in Trysil.  I don't know if it is the race that was the one that was supposed to be run by the club or not.  It had a ski jumping competition and a downhill race.  There had been races now and again going back to the 1840's, but whether official "clubs" existed to organize them isn't documented.  
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Yes, all you say is quite correct, that is why I say "Indentifiable Clubs"
post #9 of 10
 Yeah, I was thinking maybe it's a sign that some societies need to have clubs to do things and others just get out and do things.  The Norwegians and Swedes HELD the races.  The Brits and Aussies decided to form a club to do it.  
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
That is probably right, using skis in Norway and Sweden was a way of life, they did not need a club. In Australia at a time the Colony was only seventy years old and most people did not know that it even snowed here, they had no option but to club together to even reach the slopes which were hundreds of miles from the nearest town or railway. Have you read "KIANDRA - GOLD FIELDS TO SKI FIELDS"
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