EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Off-Season Sports & The Lighter Side › Cycling › What's In Your Water Cage?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What's In Your Water Cage? - Page 2

post #31 of 57
Water
Water and Supradyn or Polase
Water and apple juice

It depends on the whim of the moment
post #32 of 57
Apple juice doesn't fructose you up?    

I'm ok with it but I know a lot of people who get major problems from it.
post #33 of 57
I hear Recoverex works well......
post #34 of 57
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

Apple juice doesn't fructose you up?    

I'm ok with it but I know a lot of people who get major problems from it.

What happens? Sugar crash?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobody View Post

Water
Water and Supradyn or Polase
Water and apple juice

It depends on the whim of the moment

Any particular ratio? Apple juice is super yummy!
post #35 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by reducedfatoreo View Post
What happens? Sugar crash?
 

No,

Fructose has to go through the liver before being usable so you can't really sugar crash from it.     The wiggly little large intestine microbes have no such problems and merrily digest any excess from what your small intestine doesn't absorb.

Therefore, depending on the particular strain of baccys one has, one gets GI upset, gas, and runs.

Runs = instant electrolyte balance badness.



Quote:
Originally Posted by reducedfatoreo View Post
Any particular ratio? Apple juice is super yummy!

How much water do you go through, on average?   I know I use 800ml -1100 ml per hour.    Therefore, if I was trying to avoid problems,  using the data on this page:

http://caloriecount.about.com/calories-apple-juice-i9400

I'd go with 1, max 2 cups apple juice per liter drink mix, as anything over 300 kcal sugars per hour will go straight to the little wiggly microbes.



Edited by comprex - 7/23/2009 at 06:05 am GMT
post #36 of 57
Being as I'm drunk, and hence on the belligerent and thin skinned side, I must say that those who didn't take my advice seriously on this subject are entirely silly!

Seriously, concentrated trace minerals, when applied somewhat beyond the recommended dosage, can drastically increase the conductivity of your bodily fluids, hence allowing electrostatic energy to flow through your body to an extent that is exceptional.

In semi-excessive amounts it tastes somewhat like sweat, minus the sodium, and makes your body practically crackle with energy.

But go ahead, try to gain energy indirectly from sugar fuels, putting more gas in the tank is surely superior to making your engine function more efficiently.

post #37 of 57
Thread Starter 
Tried out the Accelerade Lemonade yesterday morning on my 12-mile commute to work. It was a hot and muggy day, and I hadn't gotten enough sleep, so the little bit of caffeine helped! Not a bad taste for a shake, just a little bit chalky, but I definitely felt more refreshed at the end of my ride. So far a thumbs-up, we'll see how it holds up on longer rides!

It's on bonktown right now, 60 servings for $25. Nice deal!
post #38 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio View Post

One of my fanatic mountain biking friends let me know that no respectable mountain biker has water cages on their bikes anymore. 


No offense to your friend, but IMO, respectable mountain bikers don't give a crap whether or not someone has water cages or not on their bikes.    Go check out a XC race sometime...watch the pro/expert class line up, then the sports, and then the beginners.  Notice how out of all of the pro/expert racers, none of them will have hydration packs.  The Sport field may be 50/50 hydration pack/no hydration pack, and the majority of beginners will most likely have them.   So according to the logic of your "fanatic mountain biking friend", the pro/expert racers are not respectable mountain bikers.  Doesn't make sense right?

But really who cares?

I used to ride with a camelback exclusively.   Then I started racing, and realized that racing with a camelback was kind of dumb if I wanted to be as fast as possible.  Then once I got used to how liberating it felt to ride without a camelback, I began to hate wearing them.  But depending on the ride I'm on, I probably ride with a Camelback 50% of my time, and the other 50% without.

In my camelback, I put nothing but pure, clean water.  Just much easier to keep the bladder and hose clean.

For my water bottle(s), it's either just water, or if it's a race or a longer ride it's either Hammer HEED or Nuun tablets.

If it's an endurance race (i.e. 8-hour solo, or 100 mile solo), I rely on nothing but Hammer Perpetuem in my water bottle.  I down one bottle of Perpetuem (2 scoops) per hour and it keeps me racing competitively and I don't have to stop for real food...which just slows you down in a race.




Edited by Tyrone Shoelaces - 7/29/2009 at 11:29 pm GMT
post #39 of 57
^^^what he said^^^

I feel wierd commenting since I've only taken a few 'cheater rides' around my house in the past 2 months. My left arm is very weak and the muscles have atrophied.

No one seems to have gotten my Recoverex joke. Recoverex is for horses! :  )

On the more serious note. I use water. Full strength Gatorade and other energy drinks are too sugary for me. It makes me gag.

In a race, (when I was 'core') speed is the essence, I use bottles. If I can I get someone to hand me a bottle during the race. I drink and put it my cage, if I want to keep it. If I can't get someone to hand off a bottle to me, I try and find a tree with a crook in it. I try and get the bottle in a position that I can grab it without dismounting.

I am less serious now. The last race I was in was last season. I used a Camelbak Rocket I believe. I use this on most of my rides.

When I go on epic all day rides. I usually carry a Camelbak Hawg with 100oz of H2o. I also carry a bottle of Country Time lemonaide, Granola Bars, and a Peanut butter sandwich.

Gels don't seem to do it for me. They only ward off Glycogen dept for a couple minutes.

I like Replenish for after a long ride or race.
post #40 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post


On the more serious note. I use water. Full strength Gatorade and other energy drinks are too sugary for me. It makes me gag.

 


Me too.  Gatorade, Cytomax, etc....way too sugary for me.

I usually try to avoid products that have high-fructose corn syrup in them.
post #41 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post





Me too.  Gatorade, Cytomax, etc....way too sugary for me.

I usually try to avoid products that have high-fructose corn syrup in them.

This is why I like green tea with a bit of honey.
Yum!
post #42 of 57
Honey = 50% fructose, which is more than HFCS 42 and about the same as HFCS 55


Now maple syrup  is interesting.   More calcium per volume than milk.
post #43 of 57
 Thanks for destroying my blissful ignorance. 
post #44 of 57
post #45 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

 Thanks for destroying my blissful ignorance. 

heh.  that made me laugh.

honey and green tea is good stuff.  which is why I clarified my high-fructose corn syrup statement above with a "usually"
post #46 of 57
You could make the argument that someone using honey will use higher-quality ingredients.
post #47 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

You could make the argument that someone using honey will use higher-quality ingredients.

That would make me sweet and of the utmost in quality. ........Thanks!
post #48 of 57
I was using water alone, but on rides longer than 3 hours water can lead to problems, see: http://chemistry.about.com/cs/5/f/blwaterintox.htm

First, water isn't as well absorbed as water with electrolytes, so if you have water by itself, it can just sit in your stomach, and if you get enough of it, it can cause GI distress.

Second, a rider can be sweating out up to a quart of water a hour. Also, you can lose anywhere from 500mg to 1000mg of salt per liter of sweat, so it's easy to get down on salt.

So, drinking limited amounts of water can lead to both dehydrated and hyponatremic.

In hot weather, I take two salt capsules per hour. I use succeed! e-caps. I don't like the endurolytes - hammer has a philosophy that salt isn't important and you can only get 240mg/hour from them (I get more than that from 1 of the capsules I take).

Things to look for:

If you weigh more after the ride than before, you are likely hyponatremic. If you drink lots of water and make no trips to the bathroom, you are likely hyponatremic. If your hands look swolen, you are likely hyponatremic.

Hyponatremia is nothing to sneeze at. The symptoms are similar to dehydration and heatstroke and many medical personel are not trained to deal with people who exercise for more than 5 hours at a time.
post #49 of 57
Anyone tried ZYM ? - it's an electrolyte replacement similar to NUUN.  Wondering how it tastes?
post #50 of 57
Thread Starter 
no, sorry, haven't tried it! 
post #51 of 57
Touring in France I frequently eat in places which serve free cheap wine with lunch.  I fill one bottle with red wine and sip it through the afternoon.  Lots of calories and it helps the legs as a vaso-dialator.  Don't knock it if you haven't tried it!
post #52 of 57
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

Touring in France I frequently eat in places which serve free cheap wine with lunch.  I fill one bottle with red wine and sip it through the afternoon.  Lots of calories and it helps the legs as a vaso-dialator.  Don't knock it if you haven't tried it!

After watching "The Triplets of Belleville" again a couple weekends ago, I was intrigued by the cartoon notion of hooking up the cyclists to IVs of red wine. Now you've gone and proven it to be true (ish)!

If I get caught with alcohol on my breath here in New York, though, I'm screwed beyond belief. Too many cops already don't like cyclists, but I gotta try the red wine on a tour some time. Maybe a nice ride through Napa?


The New York Times had a short article which included a home-made sports drink from Nancy Clark. I'll be trying out this one next and reporting on its performance:


Quote:

Sports drink recipe from “Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook”
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup orange juice
1/4 cup hot water
2 tablespoons lemon juice
3 1/2 cups cold water

In a quart pitcher, dissolve the sugar and salt in the hot water. Add the remaining ingredients and the cold water. The drink contains about 50 calories and 110 mg of sodium per 8 ounces, approximately the same as for most sports drinks.

post #53 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by reducedfatoreo View Post

Quote:


After watching "The Triplets of Belleville" again a couple weekends ago, I was intrigued by the cartoon notion of hooking up the cyclists to IVs of red wine. Now you've gone and proven it to be true (ish)!

If I get caught with alcohol on my breath here in New York, though, I'm screwed beyond belief. Too many cops already don't like cyclists, but I gotta try the red wine on a tour some time. Maybe a nice ride through Napa?




So don't drink it full-strength.    As I already posted, a nice, acidic white wine, diluted,  is MUCH tastier than the lemon concoction.

Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

If you really want to have fun with this:

3 oz Picpoul de Pinet to 1 liter water.
post #54 of 57
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post


So don't drink it full-strength.    As I already posted, a nice, acidic white wine, diluted,  is MUCH tastier than the lemon concoction.

 

I've heard through the grapevine (sorry, couldn't resist) that red wine in most cases is a bit better for you, and will dehydrate you less than white wine. The dilution probably helps counter-act the headache that sulfites in white wine can cause, but I was just curious as to why you preferred white over red on a ride.
post #55 of 57
Red seems to go all vinegary-smelling faster, and I don't care for that.
post #56 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by reducedfatoreo View Post

 I was just curious as to why you preferred white over red on a ride.

 

I usually have red in my bottle simply because I prefer my white wines chilled. 

I remember watching the Tour de France on European TV in the early '70's.  Back in those days they would have stages which turned into a "promenade", a de facto rest day when the peloton averaged about 12 mph.  With nothing else to film, the cameras would show the riders drinking wine straight out of the bottle as they rode along eating lunch.
post #57 of 57
Thread Starter 
They had GU Energy powders at the rest stops on the NYC Century this past weekend. I vote blech on all flavors .
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cycling
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Off-Season Sports & The Lighter Side › Cycling › What's In Your Water Cage?