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Time to Get in Shape for Ski Season!

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Many people ask me how to stay in shape for skiing.  Here are a few tips for an obtainable work out, try and set an achievable workout schedule and STICK to it!


STICK
 – stands for….

Set a goal, this can be 3 days a week, this can be an event like a road race or time you do a hike in.

Time – Set aside at least 20 minutes or more on your work out days and do it no matter what.  Also choose the best time during the day.  For me it is in the morning.

Increase – As you get into a rhythm start to increase your effort and your work out duration.

Cross Train – Bike, Hike, Swim, Walk, Lift Weights

Keep Going – Don’t let setbacks stop you in your tracks.  If you miss a day or a week, get right back on track!

My weekly work outs consist of…

40-75 miles on my road bike

5-15 miles road running or power hiking

2-4 miles of swimming

2-3 days of push ups, sit ups, pull ups and weights

So get out there!  Ski season is right around the corner!

post #2 of 21
No P90X?
post #3 of 21

It's weird thinking of a workout regimen as an older person (55+). You wonder how hard to push when you have body parts that don't function so well anymore in resting state, much less in workout mode. I do bike rides almost daily, and a few sets of push-ups, and occasional lap swims. Your post has me thinking I need to organize my chaotic approach into a schedule and train what I can.

post #4 of 21
I agree with the coach; find something that works for your schedule and stick with it.  I was always a little bit of a gym rat but in the early nineties I bought a traditional Lifecycle on a promo deal and I was stunned at what a three times weekly, 24 minute ride on the interval training program did for my skiing.  Sinced then I've stepped it up but everyone of my friends who have incorporated cycling into their training routine has seen really good results on the hill.
post #5 of 21
 Dan you're an animal!!!
I've amped up my Mt Biking, added some jump rope and agility ladder to my drills to develop quicker feet to help my bump skiing.

I believe that the agility ladder has already helped my mt biking, and my mt biking on tight twisty trails has forced me to look further ahead which has to translate to skiing.
post #6 of 21
James, no lecture here but you can find time,Sounds like you have started now just make it a routine.Its aways hardest to get the ball rollin' 10 minutes while watching tv stretching and situps, pushups. find another 15 minutes here or there. Its a start. 55 ain't nothing dude! excercise and stretching can only help them' there parts that don't work well at rest. that's the problem, they're at rest :)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post

It's weird thinking of a workout regimen as an older person (55+). You wonder how hard to push when you have body parts that don't function so well anymore in resting state, much less in workout mode. I do bike rides almost daily, and a few sets of push-ups, and occasional lap swims. Your post has me thinking I need to organize my chaotic approach into a schedule and train what I can.

post #7 of 21
One word comes to mind:  CROSSFIT.  I'm 40 and Crossfit has changed things for me...big time.  Try it, the results are incredible.  Just be prepared to suffer!
post #8 of 21

Dan, Your and animal, I find hiking and hopping rocks on the way down helps me pick points, 3 times a week. for starts.

post #9 of 21
My training program for the last month or so.  Rest and don't do anything to pop that rib out it's spot on my sternum.  Plan for this month, now that I can sleep on my left side again: gradually increase allowed load on left arm.

You get a much more satisfying burn in the legs, and feeling of exhaustion at the end of the day when you're out of shape anyway, not to mention a better runner's high.
post #10 of 21
Ghost...  "get a much more satisfying burn in the legs, and feeling of exhaustion at the end of the day when you're out of shape anyway, not to mention a better runner's high"  NOT.

I use the muscles that I will be using on the mountain here in the city and really get the work out I need when I put on my boot and the Virtual Snow training center I go to.  I know that there are a lot of things to do to "Wake Up" your legs and butt and get your wind...  But for my lazy mental attitude about going into the gym...  I need the trainer to give me a hard core routine and really cut the rug.

Strong legs and muscle memory have helped me keep up with my high mountain wife and not die up there on the hill.  I think she is trying to collect on the insurance.

there are others...  But here in West Los Angeles
http://www.virtualsnowla.com/


My advice...  Get a real trainer to make you work it.  And tell them what you want to get out of the workout.  Leg muscles that will keep you from blowing out a knee.  Gut strength that will enable you to jump or hop out of a cruddy moment when you have caught an edge. Hop and pull those skis out or go down!  These are the first two things I suggest folks work on.

IMHO   Keith


PS   When in shape, I ski from start of the chairs until they will not let me on them at the end of the day.
post #11 of 21
Meh, I never have any trouble keeping up.  I'll stick with my program.
post #12 of 21
I find that working my Core really helps my skiing....and for you golfers out there, the additional balance does wonders for the game.  I was turned onto a $400 machine called the I Joy....looks like a snowboard video game.  And once you get into a groove it almost doesnt feel like excercise, but I assure you, you'll feel it in the legs and abs when you are finished. 
post #13 of 21
Been back on the bike all week after coming off and banging my self up last month. The first few rides were tough but today i increased the distance and felt good enough to get 5 mins of skipping in. Oh i did 160 crunches and some weight work also. After buying some new skis this week i guess I'm motivated to be in shape for the hill this year. At 38 i want to ski harder this year than i did the last two years.
Looking to incorporate some hill sprints while this good weather lasts.
post #14 of 21
Weighted squats
Jump Boxes (i.e. find a sturdy box at least 24"+ and jump up and down on it)
Situps
pushups
run/bike
post #15 of 21
I had to make some real decisions about my physical training when I had my first knee replaced. I enlisted the help of Carmicheal Training Systems to guide my cycling conditioning. It was fairly intense for my age (74) and cycling ability. I was riding 5 days a week for an hour to hour and a half. Included were some pretty intense intervals. I had the second knee replaced this past January. Yes, I missed this past ski season. I continued my training and added in hiking a month ago.

I started skiing a week ago at Loveland, with a second day yesterday. My accomplishment is I can ski top to bottom, non-stop. I attribute this training to working my heart at 80 to 90 percent of max via the variety of interval excersizes, like fast pedal, tempo, climbing repeats and muscle tension, to name a few.

RIck H
post #16 of 21
Introduced  those dead plank core exercises to my routine. For those who do not include these i highly recomened them. They are tough however.
post #17 of 21
I have a little work out for this season. 1 legged squats,standing 1 legged on a small ball now if I could put those together.
post #18 of 21
 just remember what the great George Burns once said:
"There is nothing wrong with getting older...the key is not to grow old.''
post #19 of 21
I only started working out again this week.  Injury, fatigue and laziness have been my undoing.  Dont have any time to waste.
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by canali View Post

 just remember what the great George Burns once said:
"There is nothing wrong with getting older...the key is not to grow old.''

My brother has a good one too.  Whenever I complain about getting older, he says "it's better than the alternative".
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick H View Post

I had to make some real decisions about my physical training when I had my first knee replaced. I enlisted the help of Carmicheal Training Systems to guide my cycling conditioning. It was fairly intense for my age (74) and cycling ability. I was riding 5 days a week for an hour to hour and a half. Included were some pretty intense intervals. I had the second knee replaced this past January. Yes, I missed this past ski season. I continued my training and added in hiking a month ago.

I started skiing a week ago at Loveland, with a second day yesterday. My accomplishment is I can ski top to bottom, non-stop. I attribute this training to working my heart at 80 to 90 percent of max via the variety of interval excersizes, like fast pedal, tempo, climbing repeats and muscle tension, to name a few.

RIck H
I AM IN AWE.
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