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Ran my first 5k yesterday!

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I am not a runner but my wife really enjoys it and does well. We both ran our 1st 5k at the Revolutionary Run yesterday in George Washington Sate Park In PA. Although I haven't run in about 3 weeks, I finished with 26:32 (my time not official kept). Now I need to run another! My wife did well, finishing 12th in her age group! Lots of fun.
post #2 of 25
Wow, Finn, Great!
 
post #3 of 25
Good for you Finndog!  Now you're hooked, Right?
post #4 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

I am not a runner but my wife really enjoys it and does well. We both ran our 1st 5k at the Revolutionary Run yesterday in George Washington Sate Park In PA. Although I haven't run in about 3 weeks, I finished with 26:32 (my time not official kept). Now I need to run another! My wife did well, finishing 12th in her age group! Lots of fun.

respectable time. I dont time myself running anymore but doubt I could do that today.

congrats running is painful....
post #5 of 25
Not bad, considering it would qualify you for the SO ;). Fastest I've ran was a 23:00 or something like that. Was never really into longer distances, the most I usually do is a 3200m. I have done a half marathon though, and frankly I wouldn't do it again unless I was really out of it (mentally).
post #6 of 25
Congratulations!  I know the feeling of wanting to do another after the first, it's a fantastic feeling.  Endorphins rock!
post #7 of 25
I have run 10 marathons (including two Boston's) and I never had one stinkin endorphin molecule tickle my brain stem.......

By the way, Bushwack, running is NOT painful. Not after you become aclimated. Just gotta train the body to handle certain activities. A lot like skiing (or any other sport by the way)

Back to OP; congrats. I hope you keep it up. It is soooo much more efficient  time-wise compared to biking. My favorate form of running is trail running. Much easier on the legs then asphalt and a lot more scenic. Check in with your local running shop and they will be more then happy to give you the tour.
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarponhead View Post

I have run 10 marathons (including two Boston's) and I never had one stinkin endorphin molecule tickle my brain stem.......

By the way, Bushwack, running is NOT painful. Not after you become aclimated. Just gotta train the body to handle certain activities. A lot like skiing (or any other sport by the way)

Back to OP; congrats. I hope you keep it up. It is soooo much more efficient  time-wise compared to biking. My favorate form of running is trail running. Much easier on the legs then asphalt and a lot more scenic. Check in with your local running shop and they will be more then happy to give you the tour.

Uh, did you just have to come in and argue with every point you possibly could?  You've not had an endorphin rush, that's just too bad cause they're fantastic. 

Running can be VERY painful for some people. 

And while you might burn more calories per hour running cycling has it's benefits as well (less impact on joints, ability to go longer distances and time earlier in training etc).  I am a triathlete and chose the sport partially because of the cross-training benefits.  I do enjoy running but I enjoy mixing it up as well.  I don't think there's any reason we need to shoot down others' choice of exercise, at least they're getting out and doing something. 
post #9 of 25
Thread Starter 
Come on' now, borth are fun and great! I had a lot of knee pain until I talked to billy Kaplan (cantman) resident foot expert here, bought some good motion control shoes, Asics kayana's and some OTC arch support insoles for my other shoes and within a week, I had nearly no pain. Ran the 5k and had only a little stiffness in my knee!.

OK, yeah, we really enjoyed it and learned a lot:
1- know the route before running
2- understand your own running, cadence, pace,
3- know the distance markers, this is really key, there were only mile markers at the 1 mile post, maybe others but I didn't see them. 1/2 mile to go I couldn't see the finish so I really could have improved my time if I knew the distances. Since I don't really run (1-2 miles 2x per week) i didn't know if I would bonk or how hard to push it. I had a wedding to go to after the race.

I also learned that even with a 20 mile mtn bike ride weekly, averaging 15pmph on flat trails and doing extensive leg workouts, My legs were so sore the next day!!!

Winning times: Here's where you know you aren't in shape. Winning pace was 5:32 per mile. I think a dencent pace is 7:20-30 per mile. My goal for the next 5k will be 7:45.
post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by COSkiGirl View Post



Uh, did you just have to come in and argue with every point you possibly could?  You've not had an endorphin rush, that's just too bad cause they're fantastic. 

Running can be VERY painful for some people. 

And while you might burn more calories per hour running cycling has it's benefits as well (less impact on joints, ability to go longer distances and time earlier in training etc).  I am a triathlete and chose the sport partially because of the cross-training benefits.  I do enjoy running but I enjoy mixing it up as well.  I don't think there's any reason we need to shoot down others' choice of exercise, at least they're getting out and doing something. 

 


Just posting other view points (you call them arguments????) and don't know where you got the "shooting down" idea? Because I said running was more efficient time-wise?????

nuff said. Congrats to the op
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarponhead View Post




Just posting other view points (you call them arguments????) and don't know where you got the "shooting down" idea? Because I said running was more efficient time-wise?????

nuff said. Congrats to the op
 

It's a congratulations and celebration thread there was no need for other view points at all.  They are valid discussions I just don't think this was the proper thread. 
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post



Winning times: Here's where you know you aren't in shape. Winning pace was 5:32 per mile. I think a dencent pace is 7:20-30 per mile. My goal for the next 5k will be 7:45.
WTG Finn -- I've just started getting back into running, primarily looking at distance and going out for fun... yes it can happen, but I usually don't hit the fun mark till 3 or 4 miles and don't hit the pain point till 10 or so, but I'm slow. Best 5k time was just under 24 mins and that was when I was actively training. Usually, I just go out for long fun runs at a 10min/mile pace.

Speed doesn't necessarily translate directly over to being in shape. Running uses very specific muscles and speed generally comes from running specific training instead of from general fitness, so I wouldn't judge myself too hard on not being able to compete with the winning racers unless you're looking to really put in the time (and pain).

That being said, if you really want to cut your time down, nothing works like getting out on a track 1x per week. It kind of sucks, especially if you're like me and like going someplace with your runs, but you're going to get a better handle of what your pace should feel like and you can run some workouts designed specifically to push your VO2 Max which should translate fairly quickly into real time improvements. It's easier for me to motivate myself that way than running fartleks or time-based interval workouts.

I finished the country music 1/2 marathon earlier this year, but I was really disappointed with my time (training sucked, it was in the midst of my ski season, and I chose my priorities, so no regrets). So, the philly distance run looks like it could be my opportunity to redeem myself.

GL with the new goal and keep us updated.
post #13 of 25

Like A.N. said don't worry about the winning times. Thats from genetics pretty much. Have nothing to do with what shape your in.

Be jazzed and set a new goal (maybe faster time, maybe just a different 5k. Maybe no more racing but focus on just fun running. Don't matter). Point is, keep focused. But de-focus come winter :-)

PS epson salts really do help.......

post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 
Hey Thanks ^^  Much appreciated. I know I can't compete with the tops folks but I can do better,  I do plan to run others and do need to work on the whole pace and training of those muscles to some degree, that was an excellent point. I just think I could have off some time if I knew my own body better. My wife and I were discussing this and we both felt we learned a lot and could kock off some time just understanding the course strategy better. I was just suprosed how sore my legs were the next day. It was really fun.

PS Tarpon, no worries about the de-stoke, I stay permastoked for skiing all year. I actually visualize skiing while running.... :)
post #15 of 25
Much respect to you, Finn.  I just can't get it to go.  Either I focus on the pain or drift off into the fog.  My recent efforts in running netted me a best one mile time of...10:36.  I think I can do better

Running is good stuff though.  It will complement what you are doing in the gym.
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

I just think I could have off some time if I knew my own body better. My wife and I were discussing this and we both felt we learned a lot and could kock off some time just understanding the course strategy better.

 

Finndog, universal strategy is even splits (time wise). Pace of your 1st mile should be equal pace of your last mile. This strategy applies to all road races; 5k to the marathon.
Obviously percieved effort will change greatly. You feel "comfortable" in the 1st mile. Distressed but hanging on in the 2nd mile, and downright ugly but pushing through in the third mile. Strategy is simple but really really hard to execute. Takes time to get it right. You'll get your sense of pace from your time spent on the roads.

I'm jersey too (Blue mountain is home ski area) Give me a shout if you ever race up in central jersey.
Regardless, good luck
post #17 of 25
Thread Starter 
Hey Thanks!  Sorry to hear you ski at blue.....

I ran the first mile pretty slow to warm up plus the first 30 seconds or so was just getting through the pack! I appreciate the tips.
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarponhead View Post
Finndog, universal strategy is even splits (time wise). Pace of your 1st mile should be equal pace of your last mile. This strategy applies to all road races; 5k to the marathon.

 

I've found when aiming for a 5k PR, I do better aiming for my 1st mile being about 20 sec faster than goal, but that's probably because I do most of my training for endurance and little pace work, so I can hold on.

I don't know if we have any other distance runners here, but I'm now officially training for Philly Distance. Anyone else willing to step up to a 13.1 mile challenge?
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleph Null View Post




I've found when aiming for a 5k PR, I do better aiming for my 1st mile being about 20 sec faster than goal, but that's probably because I do most of my training for endurance and little pace work, so I can hold on.

I don't know if we have any other distance runners here, but I'm now officially training for Philly Distance. Anyone else willing to step up to a 13.1 mile challenge?

 


Yeah, this is kinda how I set up my 5K racing strategy too.  I expect my pace in the 2nd mile to fall off about 10 seconds.  That's when I concentrate on breathing and getting my HR to drop a bit from the end of the first mile.  Then, it's HR back into the red zone for the last 1.1 miles.  Let's face it, running 5Ks fast is a painful experience and it's all about how much pain you can endure.  I've run under 21 minutes on three occasions. 

I too don't do 5K specific training.  I'm more of a marathon racer.  I did 10 marathons in 22 months.  I'm currently in week 3 of training for the fall marathon season.  I'm currently signed up for the USAF Marathon in September in Dayton and the Marine Corps Marathon in DC in October.  MCM is my goal race where I hope to get the elusive BQ.  MCM Goal 3:10 - 3:15.  Current marathon PR  3:16:44

Congrats on your 1st 5K.  Keep working at it and you can make serious speed gains.  Also, in the past two years when I've been doing lots of miles training, my skiing has improved quite a bit too.  My balance, leg strength, and cardio endurance is all much improved.  I'm easily the most fit person in my group of traveling ski buddies and after a couple of days, they're toast and I'm still going strong.  In fact, on a trip to Tahoe a couple of seasons ago, we rode the Gondola down from Heavenly to our condo, my buddies walked to the grocery store, and I went for a 5 mile run.  It was a nice way to cap off the ski day and it started snowing during my run...that meant that we had loads of fresh the next day at Squaw!  Ah, the memories...when are we skiing again?  oh yeah, it's summer...track workout tonight. 
post #20 of 25
Thread Starter 
I'm up in Steamboat this week, Running a 5K with ms, Finn this AM just for fun. All good advice and good stoking material, I definitely feel better this summer and I really think it's the added cardio.
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarponhead View Post

I have run 10 marathons (including two Boston's) and I never had one stinkin endorphin molecule tickle my brain stem.......

By the way, Bushwack, running is NOT painful. Not after you become aclimated. Just gotta train the body to handle certain activities. A lot like skiing (or any other sport by the way)

Back to OP; congrats. I hope you keep it up. It is soooo much more efficient  time-wise compared to biking. My favorate form of running is trail running. Much easier on the legs then asphalt and a lot more scenic. Check in with your local running shop and they will be more then happy to give you the tour.

Don't give up on the riding however!....
You can ride until the day you die, but not many runners have cartilage left in knees/ankles to absorb shock as they get older.

Running on asphalt/gravel is definitely a more EFFICIENT way to ruin your legs....suggest running on rubberized tracks if you MUST run....ever see any world-class runners at age 37... to compare with Lance Armstrong who's still bringing it in the Tour de France..
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

I'm up in Steamboat this week, Running a 5K with ms, Finn this AM just for fun. All good advice and good stoking material, I definitely feel better this summer and I really think it's the added cardio.

Running a 5K for fun........you really have gone bonkers 
post #23 of 25

Aleph,
When's the Philly run? May be in the cards for me as I've been half-a' d training for a HM and its not far from central NJ. Any further details or website?
TIMR sounds like a serious runner- Boston Q at 3:15! That's better than 7:30/mile! 
I don't really run many races, but from what i've experienced you have to make a conscious effort not to go out too fast and burn yourself out as you're usually pretty amped up at the beginning of a race.
The surface you run on or train makes a big difference. One of the hidden gems of central NJ  is the D&R Canal towpath. Its superior to asphalt, essentially a trail, shaded and almost absolutely flat. Saves considerable wear and tear on the legs, especially as you age and add mileage.

post #24 of 25
The Philadelphia Distance Run is a big event.  I have friends that meet up there each year to watch it and I've seen coverage of the elites on TV. 

Here's the details to the event:
http://www.rnraz.com/Page669.aspx

Good luck if you decide to train and go for it. 
post #25 of 25
I have more fun running trails than roads, but I've yet to take on a serious trail race -- best one I did was one in Reading, PA called the Ugly Mudder - 7.5 miles running up and down Mount Penn with a hosed-down mud cliff that you have to scramble up on your hands to finish out. Fun Event.

I try to get as many of my long distance runs in on dirt as possible, but I've really come around to the belief that the main injury problem that runners have are caused by heel striking. I just finished a book called Born to Run (highly recommended) that's convinced me that my technique change from heel to mid/fore-foot striking will really help me out. I'm not a little dude -- over 200lbs -- but I've not had any running injuries (knock on wood) since changing my stride.

Anyway, won't go deeper into that whole topic here and now.
--

Smooth,

Philly Distance run is Sept. 20th and the website is
http://philadelphia.competitor.com/author/philadelphia/

It's one of the big 1/2s, so there's plenty to keep you going. It's organized by the same people who do all the rock and roll marathons, so I assume it's going to be a good event. If you register, I have a $10 discount code that worked last week, could save ya a couple bucks. If you're looking for a similar 10-min pace we could pace each other... harder to cheat and walk when there's someone else around.
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