New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Ski rental business

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Hello,

I am doing some research on business processes regarding sports inventory rental business...

I have some questions...

What document from customer do you require for renting?
How do you manage inventory?
When do you know that it is time for service of skis?
How do you manage finances - income, expenses, taxes?
Do you have a specific black/white list of customers? Discounts for good customers and extra charge for bad ones?
Do you have insurance for your skis?

Those are some general questions... I think I will have some more as discussion goes further ;)

Thank you for any information ;)
post #2 of 8
I have fairly close ties with my shop and can help you out a little bit.

My shop uses the following form, which they have available online so customers can walk in with it pre-signed to save time. Basic liability stuff.

http://www.bobskinners.net/pdfs/Warning-LiabilityRelease.pdf

I think they manage inventory by labels on the skis, using a single letter (usually the brand of the ski, so V for volkl, R for rossi, etc), followed by the length of the ski, then the issue # of the ski (ie, if they have 3 pairs of Volkl 170s, they would be V1701, V1702, V1703, etc.). They have the same type of system for demos.

For servicing, most skis are kept at a 1* base bevel with a 2* or 3* side, depending on the ski. Most general purpose rentals are kept at a 2* to keep them in tune longer. The ski are sharpened whenever burs occur, etc, and usually belt waxed with shop wax every few days after being rented. If the skis come in all junked up from rocks, they are usually p-tx'd right after return, or are put in que for repair. I'm not sure about grinding, but I think that they get grinds once a year.

I don't really know anything about the paper work...

As for a black/white list, people who are really local to the shop are given free rentals if they need them. I brought a friend in one day, and he needed a pair of snowboard boots (he forgot his at his house). He gave him a pair right off of the rental rack, no questions asked. My friend has since been a loyal customer to the shop. I've never heard of charging extra for customers, nor would I encourage it.

As for insurance, most shops have optional insurance for their gear that the customer pays for (usually $5 or so), which is put into a cookie jar fund. If they don't pay for the insurance and come back with a trashed pair of skis, they are usually responsible for repair.

Hope that helps.
post #3 of 8
Take a credit card deposit for the rentals, that is stronger than the $5.00 insurance.  
post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

Take a credit card deposit for the rentals, that is stronger than the $5.00 insurance.  

Yup. I also forgot to mention that there is a general info form that they collect as well (name, address, phone #, etc) ontop of the release forms. Most shops usually ask for a drivers license as well to confirm ID.
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
RiseToTheTop, thank you.

It sounds like typical small company - shop + rental with their own customers...

Which ski rentals do you prefer? Local or at ski resort?

Some information about paper work would be interesting too...
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by irafar View Post

RiseToTheTop, thank you.

It sounds like typical small company - shop + rental with their own customers...

Which ski rentals do you prefer? Local or at ski resort?

Some information about paper work would be interesting too...

If I ever had the need to rent, I would prefer shop (as long as the shop is on the way to the mountain, or not too far out of the way). Most people are too ignorant or too lazy to stop for rentals before they get to the resort and just rent at the mountain. I have had some conversations with people that were skiing on mountain rentals, and most of them didn't know about shop rentals and that they were cheaper. That said, a good shop billboard/sign can help ALOT, with specifics on price. Ski resorts are usually expensive for rentals and are of much lower quality than shop rentals. The wait is usually much longer at a resort too.
post #7 of 8
I know the shop rentals are cheaper, but the reasons to rent at the mountain are two folded and its hard to beat at the shop level.

1. Your car must have the room  to carry skis from the shop to the mountain. Normally, the shops are not in the walking distance. Strickly speaking, it is not advisable to put the skis or boards in the passenger's compartment, cause if there is an emergency stop, the skis/boards will fly in the air and kill.
 

2. For demos, you can only rent one pair per day from the shop, whereas on the mountain, you can have unlimited exchanges to test out different models/lengths. In the same vine, you will be out of luck if there is any problem with the equipement from the shop, whereas at the mountain, you can immediately swap for a replacement.
post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
You get what you pay for
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion