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Core -Class----Advil alert

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

Just started a program with a local fitness Trainer who is pretty much the evil twin of Jillian, the trainer on "biggest Loser", we did a Core class at 6 this AM, 7 stations, 1 minute intervals, go through it 2 times. Although I do stuff at home, I am awaiting the impending pain, in a good way.

post #2 of 23

Negative on the Advil.

After reading the following I haven't touched the stuff.

It's only been a week but I feel profoundly better.

I'm talking 3-4 Advil 3 times a day,never really feeling much better.

 

 

http://sanfranciscocrossfit.blogspot.com/2009/06/get-off-ibuprofen-peoples.html

Anyhow,good luck with your training

post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 

lobo, its just sarcasm. i dont reaaly take it that much. thanks

post #4 of 23

Didn't think you were serious ,I just saw that Advil mentioned in that header and felt compelled to pass on that info.

Apparently that stuff will kill you.

post #5 of 23
Thread Starter 

well, it hasn't killed me yet and I know I have taken a lot of it over the years. Keep in mind that if aspirin were to be introduced to the market today, it would be as controversial, if not more so.

 

Oh , and yes, its such a good pain this AM! :)

post #6 of 23

Finn,

 

Great to hear intensity has been added to your life.  Keep us informed so we can watch the progress.

 

Advil is trouble.  The more i hear about the risks the more I try to avoid.  It was recommended as a treatment for my tree collision.  It helped, but I was CrossFitting at the time.  I am careful not to use at all going forward.

 

bz 

post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 

Hey Paul, thanks, I try not to use it, prefer icing after workouts. I start on monday with a 3 week intensive program. 20 minutes of Plyometrics and then 40 of strength/weight training 3x week plus the core-class once a week. Emphasis is on ski related traingin.  She will be kicking my ass royally but I really need to get into decent shape, I need that other person there to push you and ensure the correct techniques are being used. Plus, I don't have the knowledege of what and why. The trainer is a registered dietitian, Certified Personal trainer and has won a bunch of natural fitness contests. At 45, and sitting behind a desk, I need to get into shape!

post #8 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

well, it hasn't killed me yet and I know I have taken a lot of it over the years. Keep in mind that if aspirin were to be introduced to the market today, it would be as controversial, if not more so.

 

Oh , and yes, its such a good pain this AM! :)

Except there is a perfectly natural alternative, that aspirin in based on, called Willow Bark and quite a few races have been suing it successfully for about 4000 years.

 

Like anything, sensible use is what is key.

post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 

not to belabor this pointless posting but http://ezinearticles.com/?The-Dangers-of-Aspirin-Use!&id=149966  http://www.mnwelldir.org/docs/cardio/cardio26.htm  and http://www.acg.gi.org/patients/women/asprin.asp

 

Use advil use aspirin or whatever as prescribed or directed and you will be fine. Anything can look like a horrible drug in the right light. Keep in mind aspirin is in the NSAID family..... http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/~cmg/Demo/pdb/cycox/cycox.html

post #10 of 23
Thread Starter 

Hey Paul, training is coming along fine, really enjoying it. It's very much like Cross training as we use a lot of the same type of excercises and philosophy of changing up routines, lots of Plyo stuff, lots of burnout sets, pyramids, pulse sets and and isometrics. Cardio has jumped and starting to see results. Food wise, I am on my weight in grams of Protein per day, I always ate several times a day but I am eating more now! Never drank enough water but trying to drink about 72 ounces of h20. What about your program?


 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post

Finn,

 

Great to hear intensity has been added to your life.  Keep us informed so we can watch the progress.

 

Advil is trouble.  The more i hear about the risks the more I try to avoid.  It was recommended as a treatment for my tree collision.  It helped, but I was CrossFitting at the time.  I am careful not to use at all going forward.

 

bz 



 

post #11 of 23

X a lant!

 

This will pay off in big benefits,

 

I am embarrassed to say this, but - I ran a personal best today for the mile:  10:33.

 

That's what it is, and everyone was kind

post #12 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

not to belabor this pointless posting but http://ezinearticles.com/?The-Dangers-of-Aspirin-Use!&id=149966  http://www.mnwelldir.org/docs/cardio/cardio26.htm  and http://www.acg.gi.org/patients/women/asprin.asp

 

Use advil use aspirin or whatever as prescribed or directed and you will be fine. Anything can look like a horrible drug in the right light. Keep in mind aspirin is in the NSAID family..... http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/~cmg/Demo/pdb/cycox/cycox.html


Finndog -- Not to contradict you, or further belabor the point on aspirin, but my understanding is that aspirin (particularly low-dose aspirin taken regularly) has a better risk-benefit trade-off than the other well-known NSAIDs -- for certain ailments.  For example, aspirin has well-established cardiovascular (heart) benefits:

 

 
 
 
Also, aspirin has recently been shown to reduce the risk of colorectal and possibly other cancers:
    
I think that cite you provided by the herbal company may be biased, perhaps because that company sells the many herbal remedies that it mentions in the article as replacements for aspirin.  For example, I've not heard of any bona fide medical study linking aspirin to Alzheimers disease. 
 
None of this is to say that aspirin -- unlike Advil -- should be used merely for relief of sore muscles.
 
And, please, anyone else reading this: I am not a doctor, so don't take my posting as medical advice. 
 
Anyway, sorry to further digress from the main point of the thread -- I just wanted to set the record straight.
 

Edited by Jimski - 6/24/2009 at 08:33 pm GMT
post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 

Jim my point was and still is that either one taken in moderation and under dr.'s orders is fine. Did you know that rattlesnake Venom can be beneficial at low levels too! :)  I am not arguing the eficacy of either drug nor denying eithers merits or detriments. are we done?  I think I need some Advil.....

post #14 of 23

In fact, a shot of rattlesnake venom, washed down by a long swig of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, is my preferred treatment for muscle soreness. 

 

So, back to core training, for both of us!     

post #15 of 23
Yes indeed, coming back to the "Core" part of the thread title, Finndog, can you tell us what specific core exercises this evil trainer has you guys doing? Jimski has another thread here asking for some good exercises following a hernia operation. Ignore the advil and maybe you guys will have something to talk about

Your intense program sounds awesome!
post #16 of 23
Thread Starter 

YES!

in General, the concept is a station-based program of 1 miniute long excercises and go through 2 cycles. We usually do 10-12 stations plus strecthing and others stuff: they change each class but some that are good and easilly done at home with a couple of basics - 5-8# medicine ball, roller wheel (something like this) and large sized excercise ball

Roller wheel, on your knees, feet up wheel stacked under your body/chest (careful not to strain back) roll wheel away from body keeping mass stacked, work center, left right.  1- minute

Planks- (excellent link) you can do these on the floor or suspended with feet on excercise ball and elbows on weight bench- front, lft side, right side- - isometric, form is critical- fun to do plank hold contests.  (you can do these on bosu balls too. or instead use bosu to balance elbow/hands on)

V-Planks/Sissor planks- sit on your butt with body at "V"- leg bent and up body up arms out forward and straight- isometric  (can sit on bosu)

Russian situps with Medicine ball; (this is a variation) legs bent hold ball over head or vary position to suit impact. You can hold in front or twist side to side as you do slow controlled situps. limit range to lifting body to should blades and just barely touching floor if at all.  You can do the traditional version as well, basically do a situp with weight in one hand and lift as you raise body.

Sideups; carefull brace your feet agains the wall while laying on the excercise ball on your hip. do side ups each side.   You can do them as reverse situps (careful with back) by laying on your stomach.

Superman: Lay on buso ball on stomach with legs spread for balance, hand out in front, basically, lifting up of legs and core simutaneously. Will work lower back and core. - watch back!

hanging crunch, if you can, hold youself up with legs hanging off ground and pull legs together up, you can twist or just lift up. 

Reverse crunch-(not sure exactly what they are called, but it's not the typical version) Lay on back on bench hold onto the becnh with hand above head and lift your whole body up so it looks like a headstand (but have weight on shoulders-watch neck!) lift yor body with your core as high as you can - DONT FALL!!!  you can also twist at top.

V-ups- hold 5# weight lie on back legs up straight- lift your body up straight with arms up straight- not towards feet.

There are more but these are some that are a little more than the basic situps and crunches.

Here's a good site on Bosu excercises.


Edited by Finndog - 6/25/2009 at 03:29 pm GMT
Edited by Finndog - 6/25/2009 at 03:34 pm GMT
Edited by Finndog - 6/25/2009 at 03:41 pm GMT
Edited by Finndog - 6/25/2009 at 03:45 pm GMT
post #17 of 23
Any weights?  Over Head Squat, Front Squat, Push Press, Push Jerk.  All of these surprised me in a big way as to their over-all training effect.  All of these work the core via stabilization.  Lifting teaches how to use ones core which is also important.  How do you bring core strength into the bumps?

Pull-ups and L- P/Us - You will see how core is drawn into play.

I like the stuff that you are doing.  We do those exercises too, excluding crunches.  So it's good, but the body does not function independently and core work is best done as part of broader training.

It might seem logical to condition the back like we might condition abs, however my best back strength has come from squats and dead lifts.  I am not telling you to do those since I am not qualified and what works for me may not necessarily work for everyone else.
post #18 of 23
Finn -- these sound like great exercises.  I'm going to print out your post so I can take it to the gym with me (after I heal). 
post #19 of 23
Thread Starter 
Hey Paul, this is just the core program, I do 3 other sessions per week for now with the trainer for all body workouts which are hour long combos of weights, Plyo, iso training and then other stuff. I also do at home sessions in between like running and stuff I can do by myslef. Good point and right on the mark. I will go to 2x week plus the core class after next week. It's expensive for the 1:1's. I will still continue at home using what I have learned. My wife just picked up two Bosu balls today and I have bumbells, weight benches and a weight machine as well. Still can't match the workout you get with a trainer but it will be fine.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post

Any weights?  Over Head Squat, Front Squat, Push Press, Push Jerk.  All of these surprised me in a big way as to their over-all training effect.  All of these work the core via stabilization.  Lifting teaches how to use ones core which is also important.  How do you bring core strength into the bumps?

Pull-ups and L- P/Us - You will see how core is drawn into play.

I like the stuff that you are doing.  We do those exercises too, excluding crunches.  So it's good, but the body does not function independently and core work is best done as part of broader training.

It might seem logical to condition the back like we might condition abs, however my best back strength has come from squats and dead lifts.  I am not telling you to do those since I am not qualified and what works for me may not necessarily work for everyone else.
post #20 of 23
Thread Starter 
Cool, just be careful! Take it very slow at first, just try a few situps to start and see how it feels the next day. Then try a front plank on your knees for a few seconds. Just be careful!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimski View Post

Finn -- these sound like great exercises.  I'm going to print out your post so I can take it to the gym with me (after I heal). 

 
post #21 of 23
right on mr.jones
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post

Any weights?  Over Head Squat, Front Squat, Push Press, Push Jerk.  All of these surprised me in a big way as to their over-all training effect.  All of these work the core via stabilization.  Lifting teaches how to use ones core which is also important.  How do you bring core strength into the bumps?

Pull-ups and L- P/Us - You will see how core is drawn into play.

I like the stuff that you are doing.  We do those exercises too, excluding crunches.  So it's good, but the body does not function independently and core work is best done as part of broader training.

It might seem logical to condition the back like we might condition abs, however my best back strength has come from squats and dead lifts.  I am not telling you to do those since I am not qualified and what works for me may not necessarily work for everyone else.
post #22 of 23
Thread Starter 
LOBO, read #19 post  this was just concerning core.   

Stabilization? Try this one ( we use the balls a lot): a solid core is essential to all fitness.

We did these after pyramid sets of inclined bench sets with free weights. Take, two bosu balls next to each other on floor. sit down between the two (front to rear), lean back and put your shoulders on the back side of the ball just so your neck is resting on the ball where it meets the floor (but not touching). Put your feet up on the top of the second bosu ball (feet together, balancing on the top of the ball.) Now lift your hips and back so your weight is now on your shoulders and you are bridged over the two balls. Next have someone hand you dumbells; arms out at 90 degrees and do reverse incline presses, do pryamid sets going up 3 weights (I am assuming you know what those are). Keep tight form and keep your hips up. If that doesn't get your core,while working your upper pecks, you're my hero!- (btw-right after the 1st set of these, jump on a peck deck, do a pyramid set, go back to the free weights, repeat and then back to the bosu ball sets....

This is not a "your workouts are harder than mine session" :) I am impressed with the Cross program. I think you misunderstanding what we do.
Edited by Finndog - 6/26/2009 at 06:45 pm GMT
Edited by Finndog - 6/26/2009 at 06:47 pm GMT
Edited by Finndog - 6/26/2009 at 06:50 pm GMT
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

LOBO, read #19 post  this was just concerning core.   

Stabilization? Try this one ( we use the balls a lot): a solid core is essential to all fitness.


This is not a "your workouts are harder than mine session" :) I am impressed with the Cross program. I think you misunderstanding what we do.



Edited by Finndog - 6/26/2009 at 06:45 pm GMT
Edited by Finndog - 6/26/2009 at 06:47 pm GMT
Edited by Finndog - 6/26/2009 at 06:50 pm GMT


Not my intention,just agreeing with Paul
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