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A fred named Joey and the "tri geeks"

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

 A few of us here will enjoy this, I promise : http://www.vimeo.com/5036151

 

Joey says;

 

"If you like poking fun at those swimmer/runners that attempt to ride bikes in races, then this video is for you. No traffic, no red lights, no stop signs. Just five miles of open road and proof that Lycra and teardrop-shaped tubing does not make a rider fast.

This vid is 8 minutes in length, but you will know after 60 seconds if it will be fun for you. Definitely different than my usual stuff. I even dusted off the road bike for this one as I went out looking for trouble in Geekland".

 

Joey also says;

 

"I have eaten so many cyclists out there that were a really good match for me because they do the "hills" wrong. The road goes over that one high bridge, but crosses a huge flood protection levee seven times round trip. The levees are steep enough to make a difference in your cadence.


What almost ALL other riders do is down-shift up the hill, then rest on the way down. Exactly what the faster guy in my vid did. You will notice at every levee, the distance between us gets cut in half.

What I do is try to "rest" on the flats. At those 7 hills, and the bridge especially, I shift UP two or three gears at the base and hammer to the top as hard as I can. It's not far! Then hammer down the other side in an all out sprint with the help of gravity and try to keep my earned momentum up as long as possible after the hill. The hill is a "slingshot" if you will. Then recover on the flats. Just the opposite of everyone else. It really must frustrate them to gain ground slowly on the flats, then loose it all at every hump. I am waging psychological warfare too. Your body being fit is only part of it.

Passing at the right moment on the bridge is CRITICAL. If I can get to the top a few seconds before the other rider, I will be doing 30+ on the way down while he is doing 15 on the way up. That will create a HUGE gap - as you could see in the vid - and generally crushes the other guy mentally. Saying "Good Morning" without sounding out of breath in an uphill sprint is a great touch too. That takes practice"!

 


Edited by WILDCAT - 6/10/2009 at 12:37 am GMT
post #2 of 22

you call that a hill?

 

 

honestly for all you know the tri geeks were on a 50 mile ride.

 

and FYI I am sure I can kill Joey Brooks in a "hill climb"

post #3 of 22

Interesting concept, gear up to go up hills.

 

Also interesting, pedal full throttle to go up the hill and speed down the hill, then recover on the flats.

 

I don't think it would work for me though. I have to gear my ancient 10-speed down to 2nd AND stand on the pedals AND lift up on the handle bars WHILE pedaling for all I'm worth to get up.  Going down I cant make my feet move fast enough to keep up, let enough gain speed.  I would need a front gear with 4 times as many teeth as my biggest gear now in order to "speed" pedal down the hell.

 

Then again that doesn't look like much of a hill.  Still I like the basic idea of working the hill and relaxing on the flat.

post #4 of 22

The other points are fair: don't switch into rest mode on the top of the hill, use the mental game of gaps.

 

 

 

If you think it's fun hunting tri-geeks on bikes, you would have a *heap* of entertainment at our swimming pool.

post #5 of 22

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Interesting concept, gear up to go up hills.

 

Also interesting, pedal full throttle to go up the hill and speed down the hill, then recover on the flats.

 

 

 You know what else pace changes like that are?  

 

Recipes for triggering leg cramps.

 

Quote:

I don't think it would work for me though. I have to gear my ancient 10-speed down to 2nd AND stand on the pedals AND lift up on the handle bars WHILE pedaling for all I'm worth to get up.  Going down I cant make my feet move fast enough to keep up, let enough gain speed.  I would need a front gear with 4 times as many teeth as my biggest gear now in order to "speed" pedal down the hell.

 

 

'79 Raleigh GP?   

 

The only things wrong with that bike are the flat pedals,  steel rims and gearing.   Ride a month or two clipless in 46x16 and you won't have any problems.

 

Quote:

Then again that doesn't look like much of a hill.  Still I like the basic idea of working the hill and relaxing on the flat.

 

Now you know how to watch the TDF.

post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 

Joey and his vids are interesting to me for several reasons. He is a strong aggressive rider that crosses boundaries. He is part Commuter, part Messenger, part Roadie & part Fred.

 

In this video he is showing the viewer that it's not the clothes or the bike that matter. It's the well developed motor and competitive personality that produces results. 

 

Michael

 

post #7 of 22

Wasn't Katrina so devastatiing because lake Pontchartrain is at sea level and the surrounding area is, for the most part, at the same? Hills....

 

Pretty sure this guy would get his ass handed to him if he were to actually start a ride with the "tri geeks" instead of poaching for 5 miles. He comes across as kind of a pompous ass in this video.

post #8 of 22

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post

In this video he is showing the viewer that it's not the clothes or the bike that matter. It's the well developed motor and competitive personality that produces results. 

 


What are the "results"? Does this guy get results if he enters an actual race, or only when stalking unsuspected riders that aren't actually racing him?

 

90 seconds of his video was enough for me.

post #9 of 22

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post

Pretty sure this guy would get his ass handed to him if he were to actually start a ride with the "tri geeks" instead of poaching for 5 miles.

 

Maybe not.      But he definitely wouldn't last one mile on a run segment, he'd drown in an open water mile,  and any one of those tri geeks could kick his poncy ass *on the 5 mile poach*  if there was any sort of a headwind.  Particularly a cold headwind.

 

Still, I see the point:  Tri is highly contrived; step out of those contrivances for one moment and see how silly it all is.    Of course, the point also applies to the video.  

post #10 of 22

I rate cyclists by how they treat their fellow cyclists.  Do they try to break up the pack, or keep it together? Do they do their share in the front, and then plug the gaps to help out the slower riders?

 

Do they dump on others baggy/lyrca clothes?  Do they say hi to people they pass.  Do they try to make a race out of every interaction?.

 

That guy flunks.

post #11 of 22

I would be surprised if Joey has ever competed on his bicycle, although he seems to think that is what he is doing here.

 

But, hey, he did that with a ulock in his back pocket! That's pretty impressive. 

post #12 of 22

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

I rate cyclists by how they treat their fellow cyclists.  Do they try to break up the pack, or keep it together? Do they do their share in the front, and then plug the gaps to help out the slower riders?

 

Do they dump on others baggy/lyrca clothes?  Do they say hi to people they pass.  Do they try to make a race out of every interaction?.

 

That guy flunks.

post #13 of 22

1 - If he wasn't going for humor, he's a bit of a wanker. Otherwise I thought it was mildly amusing.

 

2 - There were hills in that video?

 

3 - Kind of unrelated, but what's the protocol for waving to a serious roadie as you pass each other? I always give a wave, or a nod if I'm in a spot where I can't let go of the bars, but only the less "serious" looking riders wave back. Is waving for Freds?  Did I use the term Fred appropriately? Am I a Fred just for  using the term Fred?

post #14 of 22

Men with shaved legs wearing pants that reveal their genitalia get a little queer about acknowledging the attention of other men. Best to let that sort go about their business. Look the other way, pretend they aren't there.

post #15 of 22

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

Men with shaved legs wearing pants that reveal their genitalia get a little queer about acknowledging the attention of other men. Best to let that sort go about their business. Look the other way, pretend they aren't there.


 
 

post #16 of 22

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by billyymc View Post

3 - Kind of unrelated, but what's the protocol for waving to a serious roadie as you pass each other? I always give a wave, or a nod if I'm in a spot where I can't let go of the bars,


Sounds right.  If they ignore you, you might add  "Hey, your quick release is open"
 

post #17 of 22

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

Men with shaved legs wearing pants that reveal their genitalia get a little queer about acknowledging the attention of other men. Best to let that sort go about their business. Look the other way, pretend they aren't there.


Telerod flunks too.
 

 

Got to say, the shaved legs part is a bit much.

 

I was warming up for a Cat III race one day (long ago, but a decent Colorado field) and noticed I had the only unshaven legs out there.  I told a friend I'd win the race just to show them it wasn't necessary.  I did win that day and my friend thought I must be pretty worked up over the issue.

 

I then moved up to Cat II, and shaved my legs.  You just don't ride a Cat II pack with hairy legs.  If there is a wreck, it is automatically the fault of the guy with hairy legs.

 

post #18 of 22

Newfy, my post was intended to be humorous. I wave, smile or nod at every rider I see, but the roadies don't wave back. They don't seem to feel that they have anything in common with me. Do you wave to truck drivers? By the way truckers work with me in traffic I know they see me and feel me. Roadies are on another planet.

post #19 of 22

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

Newfy, my post was intended to be humorous. I wave, smile or nod at every rider I see,



 

I know that.  I should have flunked you with a  attached.

post #20 of 22

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

 

 

 

 You know what else pace changes like that are?  

 

Recipes for triggering leg cramps.

 

 

'79 Raleigh GP?   

 

The only things wrong with that bike are the flat pedals,  steel rims and gearing.   Ride a month or two clipless in 46x16 and you won't have any problems.

 

 

Now you know how to watch the TDF.

Yes the Raleigh GP.

 

I have swapped out the pedals for some sharp pointy metal ones that like to feed on my legs when I get out of sorts on a steep uphill, and a new rear cassette last year, still the same crank though (I just hammered the pins in a bit and tightened it up).

 

So that's why I get leg cramps!   I alternate between full speed until near death just because in a strange twisted way it makes me feel good, and then recovery.

 

 

post #21 of 22

that was a funny video

 

I used to ride with one group of mtb'ers alot, everytime we came to the bottom of a hill, I would speed past the group and then they would all hammer back past me and give a big effort to beat me up the hill.  I would ride a normal pace up the hill after they passed me.  Do that on every hill on your ride and they would wear themselves down amd you could really hammer them the last five miles and be the first back to the parking lot.  I would do this every ride and only one guy ever caught onto what I was doing.

I would say, "Noone remembers who was first or second for 90% of the ride, but everyone remembers who beat them back to the parking lot. 

post #22 of 22

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

  

So that's why I get leg cramps!   I alternate between full speed until near death just because in a strange twisted way it makes me feel good, and then recovery.

  

 

Did you see ABC's Superstars?    Bode Miller does the -exact-same-bonehead-move-  trying to outsprint the likes of Terrell Owens on the bike, and dies of cramps half a mile later as he drops the bike to run the rest of the distance.  

 

 

Total bike+run distance = 1.1 miles.  

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