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Sram's new 2 X 10 MTB/Cyclocross high performance drivetrain

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

The SRAM Group have brought their four component arms – SRAM, RockShox, Truvativ and Avid –together to create their first complete mountain bike groupset, dubbed XX. It's packed with features and technology, exceptionally lightweight – and expensive – and ups the ante of performance for the cross-country set. BikeRadar's technical editor James Huang headed to Borgo Pian del Mucini, Italy to find out more.

 

http://www.bikeradar.com/news/article/sram-unveil-new-xx-mountain-bike-groupset-21756

 

This could be the ultimate performance Groupe for faster MTB and Cyclocross use. At $2500 it better be good!

 

This could be the ultimate performance Groupe for faster MTB and Cyclocross use. At $2500 it better be good! They should have named it $$. The rear derailleur is compatible with Sram brifters, I'm less sure about the front. The system uses 10 speed road chains. I would consider (after plenty of research) using the rear Cassette & derailleur with a CX compact double crank, chainrings & derailleur on a touring or Cyclocross bike.

 

Michael


Edited by WILDCAT - 6/5/2009 at 12:43 pm GMT
post #2 of 19

It's really cool stuff. I'm not sure I'd replace my XTR with it, but it's really cool. The two things I like most are the hydraulic lockout for the fork and the low Q-factor of the crank. 

 

The Santa Cruz Syndicate team has been running it for DH btw.

post #3 of 19

I already run the poor mans XX on my bike but when and if I cna ever plunk 2500 down on the drivetrain this is what I would get.

 

I wonder if the 10 speed chain would work with a 1x10 though. with the 11-36 rear cassette a 36 tooth front sproket becomes a much more viable option.

 

I wonder why no grip shifters though? THe XO and X9 sram grip shifter are superb and cut down fatique on longer races. there is also less chance of breaking them as they dont protrude from the handle bars much at all.

post #4 of 19

beside the Cranks and pedal epic, what do you find so good about XTR?

 

every thing shimino I have owned just hasnt shifted right and has been super hard to maintain on trail.

 

The my sram stuff gets put away wet and shifts fine every race/ride, not to mention XO is lighter than XTR.

 

post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

I already run the poor mans XX on my bike but when and if I cna ever plunk 2500 down on the drivetrain this is what I would get.

 

I wonder if the 10 speed chain would work with a 1x10 though. with the 11-36 rear cassette a 36 tooth front sproket becomes a much more viable option.


The 1X10 should work without any special issues. I'm considering a 1X10 11-36 on my cross bike. I could use a 42t chainring and have a good touring/century/light off-road range for use in the midwest. 

 

Michael

post #6 of 19

Anyone else key in on 1:1.5 for the front rings?  Is there any further detail on that?

post #7 of 19

 I've never had a problem shifting normal chainrings without ramps and pins or other magic.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

Anyone else key in on 1:1.5 for the front rings?  Is there any further detail on that?

 

Chainring combinations are intentionally matched in 1:1.5 ratios as SRAM have discovered that that magic number yields the greatest number of points where the chain can be simultaneously fully engaged between the two rings – 13 for the 26/39T, 14 for the 28/42T and 15 for the 30/45T, whereas normally there are just two – for the smoothest possible shifting under load. 

Add in four sets of upshift ramps and pins, and another four sets of downshift points, and the result is what SRAM claim is their best front shifting to date.

post #8 of 19

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

beside the Cranks and pedal epic, what do you find so good about XTR?


Oh, just everything :) I actually use the Time pedals. I especially love the ergonomics of the dual-control shifter/rapid-rise combo. My XTR always shifts great and never quits. As for durability, I have components I purchased in 1992 that are still in use. I think X0 is great stuff too. For me, dual-control seals it and makes me run the full group otherwise maybe I'd have boutique brakes.

 

edit: as someone who runs 10spd road, it's a little scary to think how fast 10spd mountain will eat chains cogs and rings. With the prices of XX you need a lot of disposable income for drivetrain parts or a job racing mountain bikes.

post #9 of 19

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

I wonder if the 10 speed chain would work with a 1x10 though. with the 11-36 rear cassette a 36 tooth front sproket becomes a much more viable option.


Obviously, the DH guys run 1x10, probably with a 36 or 38 up front.

 

Did you know that Shimano just came out with a 12-36 cassette for 29ers? That probably actually has less range than an 11-34 though, so I guess why not just run that with a 34?

post #10 of 19

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

 I've never had a problem shifting normal chainrings without ramps and pins or other magic.....

 

Me neither. Which is why I don't know these things?

 

Quote:

Chainring combinations are intentionally matched in 1:1.5 ratios as SRAM have discovered that that magic number yields the greatest number of points where the chain can be simultaneously fully engaged between the two rings – 13 for the 26/39T, 14 for the 28/42T and 15 for the 30/45T, whereas normally there are just two –

 

 

 Right, got that part.   But, why?  And what does 'can' mean in this context, ie. how often do they?  And is it a function of having  four steenking sets of up and downshift pins:

 

 

Quote:

for the smoothest possible shifting under load. 

Add in four sets of upshift ramps and pins, and another four sets of downshift points, and the result is what SRAM claim is their best front shifting to date.

 

C'mon folks.   Ya know ya really want chain math geekery chat.

 

Modulo actually riding.

 

post #11 of 19

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 


Obviously, the DH guys run 1x10, probably with a 36 or 38 up front.

 

Did you know that Shimano just came out with a 12-36 cassette for 29ers? That probably actually has less range than an 11-34 though, so I guess why not just run that with a 34?

 

I currently run a 34/11-34 on my trance. With the 36 rear cassette I ll still have the same low 1 to 1 ratio but Ill have 36-11 instead of 34-11 top gear. I sometimes run 24 granny as well for longer races but even then I rarely use granny. The more I ride my 32-16 singlespeed the less and less I find I need a granny on my geared bike.

 

I would love to run a 2x10 with the XX but the issue is clearance for the way I ride just wouldnt work. I need a bash and I know it. banging up a 500 dollar crankset/ring just doesnt sound too appealling to me.

post #12 of 19

You could split the difference, Adam Craig rides a 35tooth with an MRP guide.

 

I think I spent 45 minutes in my granny ring yesterday on the first climb of my ride. I could make most of my rides without it, but it sure is nice to have.

post #13 of 19

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

You could split the difference, Adam Craig rides a 35tooth with an MRP guide.

 

I think I spent 45 minutes in my granny ring yesterday on the first climb of my ride. I could make most of my rides without it, but it sure is nice to have.


un hunh. thats what I run after emailing him just one tooth down from him.

 

after riding a SS a 1 to 1 feels super low compared to a 2 to 1 SS.

 

Craig's setup

 

to be honest even a 9 speed 11-36 would be great for my needs

 

edit - turns out someone already makes a 11-36 rear cassette but it cost over 3 times as much as what I can get SRAM 990s for.

 

http://www.comcycle-usa.com/ProductInfo.aspx?id=4645629

post #14 of 19

When I first started MTB, I had a 6 speed cassette. Then everything went 7, 8, 9....

 

I even remember a 2X10 setup with twist shifters (Dutch made, looked surprisingly like SRAM) in Mountain Bike Action (or was it mtbr.com?) back in the day.

 

 

I still have  2-3 newish XTR, 8 speed, rapid rise derailleurs, cassettes, on my shelves. The steel, 8 speed XTR cassette is one of the best, most durable, ever in my opinion. Rapid Rise, eh, not so great. A common complaint with 9 speed cassettes, and chains was that they clogged up with mud and leaves, and broke easily, with cross chaining.

 

I was satisfied with 8 speed stuff. Then, it started to become hard to find, during the transition over to 9 speed era. It forced me to switch everything over to 9 speed. At that time Shimano controlled the MTB market. I am still upset over these switches controlled largely by Shimano. This is one of the reasons I run SRAM now. That 29er Ventana I built is ALL SRAM, Truvativ stuff, and it works great.

 

I think the 2X10 setup is just a way to sell more stuff. Its a waste of my cash. I think its 2X10, and not 3X10 because it would break, too easily. I think of the chain angle created by a 3X10 setup, and it makes me wince.

 

Throw a multi-pivot full suspension rig into the mix? Try and figure out the appropriate chain tension, chain angle, and still use all your gears? BAH......

 

Isn't 11 speed already in the mix? HUMBUG.....

 

Epic, I want to know how long it takes for those brake rotor rivets to loosen up?

post #15 of 19

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post

Epic, I want to know how long it takes for those brake rotor rivets to loosen up?


??? - I used te same pair of rotors from 2004 until now. Haven't noticed any loosening. Not sure that would be a bad thing anyway, some brakes have "floating" rotors. Isn't that just pre-loosened rivets?

post #16 of 19

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 


??? - I used te same pair of rotors from 2004 until now. Haven't noticed any loosening. Not sure that would be a bad thing anyway, some brakes have "floating" rotors. Isn't that just pre-loosened rivets?

Well, it's more like a spool but in principle the effect is the same,,,

 

And by "can" they mean "will" at those points on the rings (how many depending on size as stated)

post #17 of 19

I'm confused now. 

post #18 of 19

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

I'm confused now. 


I was answering post #10 above....

 

post #19 of 19

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

 

 

I currently run a 34/11-34 on my trance. With the 36 rear cassette I ll still have the same low 1 to 1 ratio but Ill have 36-11 instead of 34-11 top gear. I sometimes run 24 granny as well for longer races but even then I rarely use granny. The more I ride my 32-16 singlespeed the less and less I find I need a granny on my geared bike.

 

I would love to run a 2x10 with the XX but the issue is clearance for the way I ride just wouldnt work. I need a bash and I know it. banging up a 500 dollar crankset/ring just doesnt sound too appealling to me.


The typical, 9 speed, long cage derailleur, is only designed to handle 34 tooth cassettes. Probably have to swap the whole drivetrain out for everything to work well together.
 

 

I ran into this problem a few years back converting 8 speed derailleurs (designed to handle a 32 tooth spread) over to 9 speed (34 tooth cassettes). Also had to swap out jockey wheels. It works, but wasn't particularly smooth.

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