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Ask the boot guys

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

*edit*

[i]I read the summer vacation post.  I don't know how I missed that, but at least I know why that forum is closed.[/i]  

 

Hey I wanted to post a thread in the Ask the Boot Guys forum but can't.  I read the rules for posting and it said any member is allowed to.  I posted my question in the snowboarding forum, but I'm not sure if I'll get the answer I need.  I don't want to spam, but I'm going to ask my question here because

 

A: I think skiiers have much more experience with properly aligning a person's lower body

 

and

 

B: I think skiiers probably have much more experience having to deal with perfectly fitting boots.

 

So here is my question, thanks for the patience for a new member.  :)

 

--------

 

 

I've sprained my MCL twice while snowboarding.  I've seen a podiatrist and he said it was due to overpronation of the foot, causing my knees to knock, bad alignment in my hips and spine and ultimately causing the MCL to take way too much of the stress of snowboarding than it should.  He said I need to see a very experienced ski/snowboard boot fitter to have this issue resolved (my insurance won't cover anything beyond the exam, so all he can do is tell me what's wrong but can't actually do a lot to help, go figure).

 

Anyway, I know I need some orthotics that are canted, but I don't know where to get any.  I'm guessing I'll need some custom work to fit some boots properly.  Can anyone recommend a top notch bootfitter in the Sacramento or Lake Tahoe area?

 

At least we don't generally use hardboots on our boards!

 

 

Thanks!  


Edited by Superhero - 6/3/2009 at 12:30 am GMT
post #2 of 23

You might be better off in hard boots.

 

I think the podiatrist is going beyond his area of expertise when he starts in with the analysis of your snowboarding technique. I have a friend who basically got talked out of snowboarding by a chiropractor. These health care professionals need to mind their own business. Analyzing your riding position is not what they have been trained to do.

 

The Boot Guys don't know what they're talking about either. You'll get better information posting in the general forums. If there is a boot fitter here who gives a shit, he will answer whether of not the post is made in their special forum.

 

 

 

post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 

My podiatrist isn't analyzing my snowboarding technique at all.  He recommended I go to an experience bootfitter to get the proper work done because my insurance won't cover any kind of orthotics and because it isn't his field, which he readily admits.  

 

I would never dream of quitting snowboarding!  In fact, the reason I'm looking for a good fitter is so snowboarding doesn't continue to cause injuries that may ultimately prevent me from snowboarding.

 

Thank you for taking the time to reply.  I may put up a post later describing my issues and see what I can find out.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

You might be better off in hard boots.

 

I think the podiatrist is going beyond his area of expertise when he starts in with the analysis of your snowboarding technique. I have a friend who basically got talked out of snowboarding by a chiropractor. These health care professionals need to mind their own business. Analyzing your riding position is not what they have been trained to do.

 

The Boot Guys don't know what they're talking about either. You'll get better information posting in the general forums. If there is a boot fitter here who gives a shit, he will answer whether of not the post is made in their special forum.

 

 

 

 

post #4 of 23

Welcome to EpicSki!


I'll move this over to SkiGear and see if you get some reply there.

 

I will also see if TheRusty and/or Patmoore have seen your post.

 

post #5 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

You might be better off in hard boots.

 

I think the podiatrist is going beyond his area of expertise when he starts in with the analysis of your snowboarding technique. I have a friend who basically got talked out of snowboarding by a chiropractor. These health care professionals need to mind their own business. Analyzing your riding position is not what they have been trained to do.

 

The Boot Guys don't know what they're talking about either. You'll get better information posting in the general forums. If there is a boot fitter here who gives a shit, he will answer whether of not the post is made in their special forum.

 

 

 


wow you have some pretty strong opinions
 

 

1 podiatrists are trained to look at biomechanics...the  biomechanics of snowboarding may or may not be the specialist subject of the podiatrist concerned but at the end of the day it is biomechanics, all credit to the guy who has suggested the superhero seek help form a specialist fitter.

 

2 the boot guys don't know what they are talking about...well thank you very much, that is why all of the panel run very successful businesses in the boot fitting world, if we were the run of the mill boot sellers then fair enough but every one of the people on the panel has been peer reviewed and invited to join based on their knowledge and expertise. the reason for the boot guys forum is to cut out some of the white noise which occurs on the general forums, if somone asks how a particular thing may work for them on a general forum then what tends to happen (not all the time) is people post opinions rather than facts. the idea was to build up a library of useful information that could be seached by users if they wanted to look into a subject, in the same way as the ski pro forum works...no doubt you will tell us that they don't know anything either... the advice is free and you can choose to ignor it if you like.

 

now back to the original question,  i am not even going to atempt to tell you what to do and how the orthotics should be made withous seeing your feet but....

 

the best guys in your area would be Bud Heishman at snow wind or either of the Jims  at Starthaus in Truckee.  now i don't know the geogaphy of the area very well and there may well be somewhere closer but these guys are experts in building orthotics for ski and snowboard and among the best in the USA when it comes to alignment

 

good luck

post #6 of 23

CEM, thank you for taking the time to post a reply to this.

 

 FWIW, I have  had a great experience with the "boot guys"(including the Jims at Starthaus, CEM and others) and had a particularly great experience with the boot work done by Bud Heishman, while on vacation.

 

 

post #7 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

CEM, thank you for taking the time to post a reply to this.

 

 

 

 


no problem, we aim to please
 

post #8 of 23

also looking at stance width and angles.

 

taking a lesson, in regards to stance can help with on-snow problems with balance.

 

IF the current boot was just too big that will allow too much movement in every direction and won't help either.

 

 

post #9 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CEM View Post

 


 

 

...now back to the original question,  i am not even going to atempt to tell you what to do and how the orthotics should be made withous seeing your feet but....


I didn't mean to say you guys don't know what you're talking about. But this is about the extent of the advice he would get in the ask the boot guy forum. I though he would get more feedback in the open forums, but I guess I was wrong.

 

My podiatrist is also my mentor in skiing. I can't thank him enough for the orthotics he made me when I was suffering from Plantar fasciitis. And yes I use them in my ski boots, they help. I did not mean to damn your profession or Chiropratic either, it just reminded me of another story of a health care professional who probably has never ridden a snowboard telling my friend he shouldn't ride. Which is BS, IMO.

 

Do you really believe orthotics or other modifications to his softboots would have prevented his injuries, or that the ligament sprains were caused by ill fitting boots rather than poor technique? If so, do you agree that he might be better off in hard boots? 

post #10 of 23
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the great advice here!  

 

I've got a follow up with my podiatrist next week for more fitting.  He's trying to get my feet and legs aligned properly for normal walking.  He's pretty sure he could work on my alignment for snowboarding too but he says for actual fitting he highly recommends an experienced bootfitter.  

 

I worked with Sierra Jim (though I doubt he remembers me) for a short time while he was still at Sierra Snowboard.  I've heard nothing but good things about Start Haus so I sent them an email a few days ago but still haven't heard anything.

 

My current boots are too large by maybe half to 3/4 a size.  I have ridden on them a few times while they weren't tight enough but didn't sustain any injury.  I did get some serious nerve pain between my 1st and 5th metatarsals from putting a ton of weight on the front of my foot, but it took two days of constant riding to do it.  I have since done some work to my boot to get a better fit but then I hurt my knee so...  

 

I'd like to find a fitter who also carries a good selection of snowboard boots.  I want some fit to me properly, from the orthotics to the boot itself.  Not counting the cost of a new pair of boots (and probably at full retail too *sigh*) how much should I expect the fitting to cost?

 

Thanks again!

post #11 of 23

Interesting thread.  I'd never heard of MCL problems arising from snowboarding but clearly the problem exists.  I'm a big believer in seeing a good bootfitter for ski boots but haven't given it much thought for boarding.  In the interests of full disclosure I rarely ride a softboot set up.  On my hardboot setup I can vary stance width and angles as well as canting and that takes care of the major problems caused by a severly inclined right knee (5.5 degrees as a result of three surgeries.  In skiing I don't have that luxury and have had our shop's bootfitter plane the bottom of my right boot to cure my severe A-Frame problem. 

 

I don't know if it would be of interest but I can post before and after photos.

 

Back to snowboarding.  The CATEK Quick-Cant tilt and lift system enables you to infinitely adjust your snowboard binding cant and lift settings for optimal performance and comfort. I'm just wondering if something like that wouldn't alleviate the problem.

post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 

 Just from pure curiosity I'd be interested in the pics.

 

Isn't most Catek gear designed for Alpine/hardboot style riding/carving?

 

I'm gonna google that and see what I can find.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patmoore View Post

Interesting thread.  I'd never heard of MCL problems arising from snowboarding but clearly the problem exists.  I'm a big believer in seeing a good bootfitter for ski boots but haven't given it much thought for boarding.  In the interests of full disclosure I rarely ride a softboot set up.  On my hardboot setup I can vary stance width and angles as well as canting and that takes care of the major problems caused by a severly inclined right knee (5.5 degrees as a result of three surgeries.  In skiing I don't have that luxury and have had our shop's bootfitter plane the bottom of my right boot to cure my severe A-Frame problem. 

 

I don't know if it would be of interest but I can post before and after photos.

 

Back to snowboarding.  The CATEK Quick-Cant tilt and lift system enables you to infinitely adjust your snowboard binding cant and lift settings for optimal performance and comfort. I'm just wondering if something like that wouldn't alleviate the problem.

 

post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 

Is this the binding?  $450 wow...  not even getting great reviews from what I've been able to find.

 

http://www.catek.com/FR2-soft-binding.htm

post #14 of 23

I've never tried the soft boot version and just bought the race version on the recommendations of several other racers.  I had been riding Burton Race Plates but they didn't allow me any cant or tilt.  The new ones just arrived and even though the cast is off my foot, there's still the matter of a lack of snow here in New England.  I'll just have to wait until November to try 'em.  I'm not in a position to recommend any manufacturer's softboot bindings but there have to be good quality ones out there that will allow you some latitude in affecting your stance on the board.

 

Here are a couple of ski boot photos to show how far my right knee is out of whack.

 

 

The first photo below was taken with same pair of unplaned boots and the A-Framing is very evident.  The second photo is on Race Stock Langes that had been planed.  It was a much steeper course but I was having a little better luck keeping my knees apart.

 

 

On the board my only concern is good forward flex and I get it from a modified pair of Head Strato Pros.  Any alignment problems caused by the bad knee can be addressed with the bindings.

 

 

 

Technique needs work but I get by for a guy old enough to collect Social Security.

 

 

 

post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 

Both of my legs look like your right leg!  So you think a good bootfitter can correct this?

 

You look rock solid on skis and your board.  :) 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patmoore View Post

I've never tried the soft boot version and just bought the race version on the recommendations of several other racers.  I had been riding Burton Race Plates but they didn't allow me any cant or tilt.  The new ones just arrived and even though the cast is off my foot, there's still the matter of a lack of snow here in New England.  I'll just have to wait until November to try 'em.  I'm not in a position to recommend any manufacturer's softboot bindings but there have to be good quality ones out there that will allow you some latitude in affecting your stance on the board.

 

Here are a couple of ski boot photos to show how far my right knee is out of whack.

 

 

The first photo below was taken with same pair of unplaned boots and the A-Framing is very evident.  The second photo is on Race Stock Langes that had been planed.  It was a much steeper course but I was having a little better luck keeping my knees apart.

 

 

On the board my only concern is good forward flex and I get it from a modified pair of Head Strato Pros.  Any alignment problems caused by the bad knee can be addressed with the bindings.

 

 

 

Technique needs work but I get by for a guy old enough to collect Social Security.

 

 

 

 

post #16 of 23
Thread Starter 

 Oh patmoore I posted your pic in another thread of mine here on epicski.  I didn't think it would be an issue but if this is a problem I'll be happy to take it down.  I shoulda asked first, sorry mate.

post #17 of 23

Not a problem.  

post #18 of 23

Anyone have a recommendation for a good bootfitter in the DC area?

post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimintokyo View Post

Anyone have a recommendation for a good bootfitter in the DC area?

 

 

For pre-purchase consult, purchase,  or fixing the fit of a purchased boot?

post #20 of 23

Consult and purchase...a friend working in China will be in DC around Thanksgiving and then will come to Japan to ski with me at Niseko in January and is thinking to buy boots while in the US.

post #21 of 23

Brian Beaumont at Ski Center -  Mass. Ave. and 49th (near American University).     Best selection in a 50 mile radius.    Be aware that   BB and the other Brian are by appointment only.

post #22 of 23

Thanks for that; will pass it on. 

post #23 of 23
Quote:

Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

Do you really believe orthotics or other modifications to his softboots would have prevented his injuries, or that the ligament sprains were caused by ill fitting boots rather than poor technique? If so, do you agree that he might be better off in hard boots? 

 

 

As suspected, the boot guy had nothing to say... 

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