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Puncture Resistant Tubes

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I just bought some new Michelin Krylion Carbons, wich weigh 220g per tire.

 

Silly me also bought a Forte puncture resistance tube (for the rear) which weighs 265 grams.

 

Does this seem like a stupid combo?

post #2 of 11

 Sounds like a great combo if you don't want flats, not so good if you want to keep moment of inertia down.

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 Sounds like a great combo if you don't want flats, not so good if you want to keep moment of inertia down.

 

Yeah, MOI is exactly what I was thinking...

 

I was more sick of the Maxxis Fuse that came with the bike sucking up rocks. On my lst ride out I had to stop and pull 4 rocks out (no puncture though) becasue all I could hear was clicking...

 

 

Anyways, I didn't try too  hard, but there is no way in hell I can get that tube in under those tires. Back to my Conti race tubes I guess. I put the tube on the rim and it looked like its own tire!

post #4 of 11

Sounds like a hybrid tube. In all honesty, I've never used a slime-tube in my own bike. I've run juice in a few tubeless tires, but if you take care of tire pressure, that will eliminate most of your flats anyway. 

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

Aside from one stone that went through last summer, and flatted overnight, I haven't seen a flat.

 

Oh yeah, I had a tube explode in the living room...

 

EDIT: Not a hybrid tube, it was this one: Forte Road Thorn

 

Soon to be in gear swap methinks.

post #6 of 11

how much does weight actually matter?

 

coming from a mtb stand point I would rather carry extra pounds and never flat over being light and risk flatting.

post #7 of 11

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

how much does weight actually matter?

 

coming from a mtb stand point I would rather carry extra pounds and never flat over being light and risk flatting.


I agree with BinPA, though for slightly different reasons. I ride my road bike to train, not to race, so I actually downgraded the wheelset that came with my eBay Cannondale, and have been very happy with the bombproof set I have now.

 

Epic is spot on–control your pressure well and you won't really have to worry about punctures.

 

As for how much weight matters, weight elsewhere on the bike doesn't matter as much (i.e. your own weight, saddle weight, etc). What *do* matter, if you are being a total weight weenie , are rim weights and pedal weights. You guys touched on it above, talking about MOI, and it's specifically those rotational areas of inertia that make the biggest difference.

 

Ever notice how those low spoke-count wheels that look so cool (I'm guilty of owning a pair ) don't tell you how much the rims weigh, but only how much the total wheel weighs? Fewer spokes does cut down on total weight, but that often means that the rim itself has to be stronger and heavier in order to make up for the fewer points of contact. That in turn means that there's more rotational inertia that you have to overcome when accelerating.

 

The same goes for pedals. The less mass is on the outer circumference of the three circles (front wheel, rear wheel, and pedals), the less inertia you have to overcome with your leg muscles. The weight of the rest of your bike will of course contribute to the overall inertia, but those three points are the most important.

 

/thread hijack

post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 

I pretty much ride in the same way you describe reduced. I go just to get out there, I can't be a weight weniie with the bike until Iget myself down a few pounds. It just shocked me though, I pulled the tire out of the box in one hand, and the tube in the other. The tube was noticibly heavier.

 

I swapped out my rear tire while watching some TV last night. I left my "old" (2 months?) tube in there, and I had a hard enough time getting the tire over the rim with a skinny tube, let alone the monster thorn,knife and spear proof Forte

post #9 of 11

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

how much does weight actually matter?

 

coming from a mtb stand point I would rather carry extra pounds and never flat over being light and risk flatting.


I'd rather have light tires that never flat. That's my goal anyway. Considering how very little horsepower I have, I want to minimize moment of inertia and rolling resistance as much as I can.

post #10 of 11

Talking about tires that never flat, I have one question :)

I'm thinking and thinking (to be honest for few years already) to convert my non-UST rims and tires (Schwalbe Racing Ralph/Rocket Ron combo) into tubeless. I heard so many stories ranging from "it's perfect, it's the only way to go" to "it's complete crap, never do this". Does anyone have any experiences doing this by him/herself?

Idea is really appealing to me, even though I might get 1 flat tire a year, but on the other side those bad stories (mostly about Schwalbe tires "delaminating" with sealant (NoTubes, DT Swiss...), and I have no wish to change current tire combo for anything else) I heard of, or I was reading about, doesn't make me feel too comfortable doing this.

Weight is not really all that big issue, especially since after some calculations I made, there's almost no difference in weight between one or another option. But being able to run a little bit lower pressure (though not much lower with my tires and their extremely thin sidewalls), and eliminating need to worry about thorns I might run over on track, makes me really eager to try this.

So any experiences? :)

post #11 of 11

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post

Talking about tires that never flat, I have one question :)

I'm thinking and thinking (to be honest for few years already) to convert my non-UST rims and tires (Schwalbe Racing Ralph/Rocket Ron combo) into tubeless. I heard so many stories ranging from "it's perfect, it's the only way to go" to "it's complete crap, never do this". Does anyone have any experiences doing this by him/herself?

Idea is really appealing to me, even though I might get 1 flat tire a year, but on the other side those bad stories (mostly about Schwalbe tires "delaminating" with sealant (NoTubes, DT Swiss...), and I have no wish to change current tire combo for anything else) I heard of, or I was reading about, doesn't make me feel too comfortable doing this.

Weight is not really all that big issue, especially since after some calculations I made, there's almost no difference in weight between one or another option. But being able to run a little bit lower pressure (though not much lower with my tires and their extremely thin sidewalls), and eliminating need to worry about thorns I might run over on track, makes me really eager to try this.

So any experiences? :)


start another topic or research ghetto tubeless.....

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