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Morning Rides, what to eat? - Page 2

post #31 of 39
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post

Well. Maybe this may clear up some questions about sodium.

 

Kangaroo rats? Why am I reminded about starving settlers, that ate petrified rat urine deposits, as they crossed Utah? (And suffered severe cramping and some died)

 

Anyhow....

 

http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/hydrationandfluid/a/Sodium_Salt.htm

 

Thanks for that, now I won't be able to eat anything today!

post #32 of 39

 Thanks for posting the article.

 

Hyponatremia is a real issue for endurance athletes, especially during the hot summer months.  Thus why I add a pinch of sea salt (less processed than iodized table salt, and less concentrated, too) to my water bottle during the hottest months: you can't really taste it, and it keeps replenishing salt levels.  The HEED/Perpeteum mix isn't as salty (or as sugary) as Gatorade, so the pinch of salt helps.

 

Furthermore, I know that I sweat a lot, and that I lose a lot of electrolytes - salt, potassium and calcium - while working out.  Those three are the most critical for proper muscle function, so I make sure that they are well represented in my on-bike nutrition.

 

Recovery was also mentioned, and I can't stress that enough!  Post-ride energy replenishment is best started within 30-45 minutes after a ride.  I tend to start the process with a pint of chocolate milk, when possible, as it is a great source of protein and carbs, as well as calcium.  I'll also eat a sandwich (turkey and swiss with lots of veggies on whole-grain bread is a fave) and drink a lot of fluids within an hour after an especially long ride, just to keep the tank filled and replenish glycogen levels.

 

During the height of riding season, it's typical foor me to do back-to-back days with 80-100 miles per day, so it's important to keep up with nutrition - especially when these rides start at an earlier hour than I'd like.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post

Well. Maybe this may clear up some questions about sodium.

 

 

http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/hydrationandfluid/a/Sodium_Salt.htm

 

post #33 of 39

^^^nice article and tips.

 

Kyle thanks for starting this thread.

 

I've typically had a light snack type breakfast prior to morning rides, but after a trip to the hospital, I decided that I needed to be more conscious of my protein levels when I take those early morning rides.

 

 A tip I read on SkiDiva seems to be a great trick for me.

I make a peanut butter sandwich with a tortilla shell.

Put the peanut butter and honey on half the shell, fold in half then in half again, to make a quarter.

It tastes good and gives me just the shot I need to keep me from another trip to the hospital.

 

 

*My hydration was good, and my minerals were fine(sodium, magnesium, calcium, etc), but my Blood sugar bottomed out at somewhere around 26.

My gf said that I passed out, drooling, choking on my tongue, and eyes rolled back, but she didn't get any pics so .....no pics, no proof, eh?. 

 

 

post #34 of 39

Another good artcle from the xterra site. Pretty much what we've said already.

 

http://www.xterraplanet.com/training/dsp_content.cfm?id=91

 

 

A list of good nutrition articles.

 

http://www.xterraplanet.com/training/article_list.cfm?type=nutrition

 

 

 

 

 

post #35 of 39

for our weekend 50's I have a couple of fig newton bars or a cliff bar and a banana.  I usually have a gu after the first hour or hour and a half on the bike. 

post #36 of 39

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

^^^nice article and tips.

 

Kyle thanks for starting this thread.

 

I've typically had a light snack type breakfast prior to morning rides, but after a trip to the hospital, I decided that I needed to be more conscious of my protein levels when I take those early morning rides.

 

 A tip I read on SkiDiva seems to be a great trick for me.

I make a peanut butter sandwich with a tortilla shell.

Put the peanut butter and honey on half the shell, fold in half then in half again, to make a quarter.

It tastes good and gives me just the shot I need to keep me from another trip to the hospital.

 

 

*My hydration was good, and my minerals were fine(sodium, magnesium, calcium, etc), but my Blood sugar bottomed out at somewhere around 26.

My gf said that I passed out, drooling, choking on my tongue, and eyes rolled back, but she didn't get any pics so .....no pics, no proof, eh?. 

 

 


This makes a good point that some people overlook. If you're doing any kind of a serious ride, your body has to have the right fuel. Right before a long ride is not the time you should be worried about dieting. We typically do a 40-50 mile ride early Sunday mornings. I find that a breakfast sandwich consisting of a bagel and some kind of protein such as ham, egg, peanut butter, a combination of both, etc, works for me. The bagel gives you the carbs and sugar that you need, combined with some form of protein and adequate hydration is enough to keep me going. I'll typically have a fruit drink with breakfast, cranberry-apple is my favorite, less acid than straight OJ or cranberry juice. I'll usually bring a bottle of water plus a bottle of Gatorade, or if that is too rough on the stomach as some people have told me, you can always dilute it. And I very seldom leave the house without a few bananas. One before the ride and just after can help out with any cramping issues. One thing I stay away from the morning before I ride is coffee or tea. Both serve as a diuretic, and just help to dehydrate you.
 

post #37 of 39

 

Quote:

 A tip I read on SkiDiva seems to be a great trick for me.

I make a peanut butter sandwich with a tortilla shell.

Put the peanut butter and honey on half the shell, fold in half then in half again, to make a quarter.

It tastes good and gives me just the shot I need to keep me from another trip to the hospital.

 


I'm gonna try out this snack on my 75 this weekend. Sounds yummy!

post #38 of 39

hey ... you're right that 1 lb on the human body equals 3,500 calories. 

 

If you consume 3,500 calorie units (food) more than you burn off (heat) then you will gain the pound.  If you burn 3,500 more calories than you eat you lose a pound. 

 

I just wanted to clarify ... because some could misconstrue your post and think that by eating an extra 3,500 calories they will lose 1 pound.  That would add up fast!  ha ha

 

 

post #39 of 39

I am reading through this thread and replying sporadically ... apologies if that's confusing.

 

This is the best post I have read thus far.  I previously commented on the 3,500 calories thing.  I later read "a pound of muscle weighs more than a pound of fat" ... hee hee.  I want one of those scales where "pounds" have different weights!  Ok, all teasing aside ... a pound is a pound is a pound -- we can all agree!  Fat occupies more space than muscle.  This explains why two people can weigh exactly the same and wear very different clothing sizes.  The more muscular person will have a more compact body.

 

In addition to all the goodstuff Johnnys Zoo wrote ... I wanted to add this thought ... you might gain a little weight as you add more muscle.  It's ok.  Being healthy and fit is the key.  If losing weight or changing your muscle to fat ratios is important to you (it is to me!) then I recommend taking your measurements now and again at monthly intervals.  The scale may not be the right indicator.

 

Moreover ... salt is important.  Everyone sweats differently and some people lose a lot more salt than others.  We need to replace our electrolytes, but a lot of endurance athletes will eat salty things the day before a big ride.  If you get into the habit of eating a bit more salt (for hydration) the scale is going to be skewwed by that extra water.

 

Just things to think about ...  

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post

Hi Kyle,

 

I would like to preface by saying that, you can find any variation, of any theory, if you look hard enough.

 

Most athletes find their own proper diet, over a course of training, reading, and experimenting. Everyone I have ever worked with is different.

 

There is even an 'eat nothing philosopy'. Something to do with building your tolerances to metabolites, by 'training empty.' I would not recommend this one.

 

However, you will find there is a training effect. The more effectively you train, the less you will require to sustain you through a ride. This may be mildly confusing because, as your body adapts, your overall daily intake of calories may increase. Basically, your machine is becoming more effecient.

 

Caffeine. As a coffee drinker myself, I rarely start my day without a mug. I offset the coffee with an equal amount of water or juice.

 

Fat soluble foods. Generally, I avoid them before a hard ride. If you choose to do the sausage, bacon, and gravy, it takes longer to break down. If you eat like this, directly before a ride, you won't have a good day. It simply pulls your blood concentration to your digestive system, and away from your muscles, heart, and lungs. Sometimes I partake in these foods, if I know, the ride is several hours off. I do like my eggs scambled, if I need some protein to stick with me a while, before a long ride or a race.

 

Water soluable foods. These are the most easily broken down. These foods are good to eat basically anytime as it takes shorter time to enter your system. Fruits...especially lots of  Bananas are a staple of my training and race diet.

 

Carbos. Yeah, call me old school if you want, I'm a firm believer in carbo's and carbo loading. Pasta and Pancakes, I like bagels too. Juice.

 

Calcium. Yeah this is good too.  Necessary for proper muscle contraction. So, drink yer milk, and spread on the cream cheese. Yogurt.

 

Water. Yes hydrate or die. But, watch this, over and under hydation can have ill effects. Under hydation is obvious, right? Well, too much can flush your electrolyes out, delaying recovery, giving ya the squirts....etc.

 

So, just a few tips from a one armed bandit.

 

My suggestion is to start out with a light meal pre-ride. Take something with you. A couple of granola bars for example. If you even feel like you might bonk, Stop. Eat and drink, note your time. I read some where that at race pace for conditioned athletes to take a couple of sips every eight minutes.

 

Regiment everything.

 

 

REMEMBER...Recovery is every bit, and maybe more important, than pre-ride. Do not neglect this! Because you want to ride tomorrow right?



 

Team in Training -- El Tour de Tucson 2009

 

(for The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society)

 

pages.teamintraining.org/ma/tucson09/klkaye -- fundraising

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