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footbeds & insoles

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I was shopping for some insoles in athletic shoe stores today. I was surprised to find that three out of four stores offered only rubber foam or gel insoles. All were well contoured and claimed to offer support and heel stability but they couldn't have been as controlling as the typical ski boot aftermarket insole/foot bed. Nothing nearly as firm as superfeet green or the downunders or surefoot custom foot beds. Anyone know why insoles in running/walking shoes are so much softer than in ski or snowboard boots?

post #2 of 10

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by steveturner View Post

 Anyone know why insoles in running/walking shoes are so much softer than in ski or snowboard boots?

 

The front is soft so you can roll onto the ball of your foot and still have traction with your toes as your heel leaves the ground;

 

the rear is soft so you don't slam your heel onto the ground;

 

the middle is soft so your arch can change shape between those two extremes.

post #3 of 10

Which are soft?

My custom made orthotics are fairly firm... but have some rocker and flex and channels for my foot structures... they stop before the ball of foot though...

They work by realigning bones in the ankle area if I understood the podiatrists(i have had a few pairs over the years) description...  

 

My ski orthotics have less flex and no rocker... and are generally less comfortable to wear long term...despite being a little more "cushy" to the touch...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by steveturner View Post

I was shopping for some insoles in athletic shoe stores today. I was surprised to find that three out of four stores offered only rubber foam or gel insoles. All were well contoured and claimed to offer support and heel stability but they couldn't have been as controlling as the typical ski boot aftermarket insole/foot bed. Nothing nearly as firm as superfeet green or the downunders or surefoot custom foot beds. Anyone know why insoles in running/walking shoes are so much softer than in ski or snowboard boots?

 

post #4 of 10

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The bottom of my boot looks like this... This horizontal rib is at the vorst place . Front part of my foot start to hurt after an hour of skiing

Custom sole didn't help.

So what I did... I took one tile of an office carpet and cut out soles. I placed them into the plastic boot. Inner boot stiil has custom fit sole... It felt very comfortable...

 

So.. I can sugest to cut out an extra sole from carpet... In case the boot designer was an idiot :D


Edited by irafar - 5/22/2009 at 06:48 am GMT
post #5 of 10

 

Err, what kind of boot is this?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by irafar View Post

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The bottom of my boot looks like this... This horizontal rib is at the vorst place . Front part of my foot start to hurt after an hour of skiing

Custom sole didn't help.

So what I did... I took one tile of an office carpet and cut out soles. I placed them into the plastic boot. Inner boot stiil has custom fit sole... It felt very comfortable...

 

So.. I can sugest to cut out an extra sole from carpet... In case the boot designer was an idiot :D


Edited by irafar - 5/22/2009 at 06:48 am GMT

 

post #6 of 10

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

 

Err, what kind of boot is this?

 

 


Just for fun... I'm guessing one minus the zeppa... Which I'm guessing is where you were heading...

post #7 of 10

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post

 


Just for fun... I'm guessing one minus the zeppa... Which I'm guessing is where you were heading...


Except I was gonna call it 'footboard'.  

post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by irafar View Post

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The bottom of my boot looks like this... This horizontal rib is at the vorst place . Front part of my foot start to hurt after an hour of skiing

Custom sole didn't help.

So what I did... I took one tile of an office carpet and cut out soles. I placed them into the plastic boot. Inner boot stiil has custom fit sole... It felt very comfortable...

 

So.. I can sugest to cut out an extra sole from carpet... In case the boot designer was an idiot :D


Edited by irafar - 5/22/2009 at 06:48 am GMT


'...boot designer and idiot" I don't think so!

Is this a joke or did someone sell/give you some boots without a zeppa?
 

post #9 of 10

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by steveturner View Post

Is this a joke or did someone sell/give you some boots without a zeppa?
 

 

There is a _slight_ chance he's talking about some variant of a cross-country, back country, or telemark boot.    There have been some truly weird things produced in those genres.

post #10 of 10

there are plenty of lower spec boots which do not have a zeppa, the ribs are spaced so most people will not feel them....obviously there are exceptions to every rule

 

back to the original question "why do athletic shops generally sell soft insoles/orthotics?"

 

well IMO it sparks back to the late 70's early 80's when sports medicine came along and any runner with an injury was dispensed a pair of rigid hard orthotics...now if they worked for you then great but unless well made a rigid device [especially the 3/4 lenght ones] can hurt like hell when you run on it...the runners rebelled and orthotics are often still seen as a bad thing because of 30 year old prejudices..the sports shops sell these soft inserts because they beleive that is what runners want they have also been told by reps from 15 different shoe companies that you  do not need orthotics as that companies shoes do everything the orthotic does, they have shoes to stop pronation shoes to limit pronation and shoes for people who are neutral.

 

think about a support shoe, the medial side is stregthened so that the foot as it pronate cannot distort it too much, the problem is that the insole of the shoe is flat, the foot will pronate until it either hits the insole or runs out of available range of motion, a well made semi rigid orthotic or even an off the peg one will bring the ground back up to meet the underside of the foot, by doing this the foot can pronate a small amoutn to adapt, it then hits the insole, the message is sent to the brain that pronation is complete and the foot should then start to supinate to propel the runner forward.

 

this is not to say that soft insoles are all bad...but for the majority of people think about running on soft sand......did you notice how far you didn't  get!

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