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Back into Skiing - 1 question

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

  After an 10+ year break, I am getting back into skiing.  I know it's May, but I am ready to go skiing right now.  The real reason to get back in, is that my daughters are 5 and 7 now and we need a winter hobby and it is the right time for me to get back into skiing.  The reason I got out of skiing is that once you ride a set of skis with a motor inbetween them, the andrenalin rush enslaves you.  I'm not letting go of that, just not going as much any more.  

  I'll give you a little ski background on myself,  I used to ski a lot in my twenties, it was a short while before I smartened up and bought a ski pass.  I had a night ski pass to Jiminy Peak for a number of years and joined the SUNY Buffalo ski club for 4 years, what a bargain that was!  I think it was called the Schussmiesters??

I skied 65 times one season, 45 times on the night pass at Jiminy Peak and the other 20 around northern NY and VT.  Shape skis were coming out when I stopped skiing.

A couple weeks ago, I bought a set of Nordica Supercharger boots because they fit unbelievably good.  I thought I was just window shopping, but they fit so well, I couldn't leave them there.    

  I am having a tough time picking out skis for myself.  My favorite skis were a set of wood core Tyrolia GS skis that were stiff as hell and took all the abuse I could lay on them for 3 hard years.  Now they don't even make GS skis as far as I can tell.  Whats the new name for GS skis?  My one friend tells me that the skis are now designed very wide under the foot and are designed to be skied at shoulder width and you aren't supposed to ski with your feet together.  I was thinking later, Huh??  How are people supposed to ski moguls with their feet apart???

Any suggestions??  I still want a stiff ski, I think??

I have a lot to relearn.  I hope I can still carve a turn,

 

I should add that after reading a boatload of reviews, I am very overwhelmed with a lot of the ski info.  I still can't figure out what ski length I should go with.  I always skied 200 cm old skis, what should I be looking for now?


Edited by unclejoe900 - 5/21/2009 at 02:34 am GMT
post #2 of 9

You are gonna find the shaped skis are great, I was skiing GS G9 Dynastars 200 cm when I went to shaped skis 5 yrs ago (Fischer RX8's 170 cm), I probably should have gotten them in a 165 cm length. But for someoe that had not been on anything less than 200 cm in 20 yrs, thats where I ended.

Get your self an instructor that has made the transision fron straight to shaped ski's tell them you want to make that transision. It's easier, faster with a whole lot less effort then with straight skis. Tip them on edge with leg extension and retraction, rather than the weight, unweight technique with the straight skis.

Depending if you ski hardpack, groomed corderoy or spend your time in the ungroomed powder, the width underfoot (waist)  becomes a deciding factor. 65-68 mm width for hard pack, 70 mm + for soft snow and really wide for deep powder.

1 to 2 hrs with a instructor that has made the transision is all it takes, the technique is just a little different, don't work and ski them like the old straight skis, they can be skied like the old but it's alot more fun using the new technique the shape allows.

post #3 of 9

They still make GS skis.  However, you may be better off with something else.

 

I recommend you pay 20 bucks and get a subscription to the reviews Peter Keelty's site (realskiers.com or expertskier.com).  There you will get stats on skis for the last few years.

 

You need to pay attention to the turn radius of the ski, and match it to what you enjoy making.

 

A 13 m turn radius ski will work best for learning technique and making tons of short turns.

A 26 m turn radius ski will be more fun for blasting down the hill flying off every roller and peak.

A 17 m turn radius ski makes a nice compromise.

A SG ski is nice for going really fast.

 

The limiting factor is that a ski will not make a beautiful smooth purely carved arced turn greater than its sidecut radius.  Sure it will make the turn, but it won't be a clean turn.  The larger turn radius skis on the other hand are designed to be stiff enough to only bend into large radius turns with the forces generated at higher speeds, so they will be a lot less happy making smaller turns or going slower.

 

Next you have to look at stiffness.  The harder and faster you ski the stiffer you want.

 

Width - 65 to 70 for hardpack and mostly groomed conditions, Wider as the snow gets softer and deeper.

 

Length.  Depends on how much you weigh.  If you are 200 lbs or more get the longest length the ski comes in. If you weigh 120 lbs, get the shortest length available.  Bias your decision on how fast you ski.  Length is also ski purpose specific.  For example I weigh 170 lbs, ski fast, ski my slalom (13 m radius) ski in a 165,  and my Volant Machete G (about 23 m radius) in a 190 cm and my old Kästle Super Giant Slalom skis in 208 cm, and find those lengths just about perfect.

 

Tell us how tall you are and how much you weigh and what kind of turns you like to make.


Edited by Ghost - 5/31/2009 at 08:17 pm GMT
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

200 lbs, 6 feet and I don't really have a turn preference.  But I would lean towards big long turns.

The Dynastar 4X4 were a suggestion I got from a friend (he did some brainstorming with another friend and they gave me 3 suggestions) and I am leaning towards them.  I was thinking of getting the 184's but after reading the review on this site, I feel way off on the length and could use some more judgement.

 

Thanks for your help!!!

post #5 of 9

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by unclejoe900 View Post

200 lbs, 6 feet and I don't really have a turn preference.  But I would lean towards big long turns.

The Dynastar 4X4 were a suggestion I got from a friend (he did some brainstorming with another friend and they gave me 3 suggestions) and I am leaning towards them.  I was thinking of getting the 184's but after reading the review on this site, I feel way off on the length and could use some more judgement.

 

Thanks for your help!!!

 

I think Ghost gave you a really complete answer and based on your height and weight, I would suggest the 184s for you. I am 5'10 about 190 and have no problem turning skis in the 180-190 range and really like my Dynastar 184 Mythic Riders which are 88 under the boot. The MRs in that length are pretty stiff under foot and I think would work very well back east in more icy conditions, but they still have enough width to float in maybe 6"-8" of fresh/soft snow, whereas a ski in the 70's underfoot, may not work as easily in those conditions for you. The turn radius is 23m on the MR, so really about perfect for the range of turns I like to do. I am not familiar with the 4X4, but there is a lot of info on it here if you search. In the beginning, I would stay away from skis in the 30+m turn radius range.

If your coming back to the sport, you will likely make progress very quickly and start to collect a quiver of skis. A quiver of two that is 88ish and 105 underfoot should keep you going for a few years before you need to broaden it IMO or you could go quiver of three that is 70's, 90's, 115ish to cover all the bases. Hopefully your better at controlling your gear hoarding than I am.

Welcome back.


Edited by liv2 ski - 5/21/2009 at 01:23 pm GMT
post #6 of 9

UncleJoe,


I just got back into skiing recently after a 10 year hiatus as well.

 

The best advice I can offer is:

 

#1 Read as much as you can about new gear, which it seems like you've already done a lot of.

#2 Don't let wide skis scare you away. A lot of people on Epic will steer you towards a 70-80mm ski but keep your mind open.

If you like speed and big turns you wouldn't be doing yourself a disservice if you went with something 100mm under foot and 20-30 meter sidecut. You might surprise yourself with the stability a wider ski provides.

 

I ski strictly East Coast and skied the Volkl Gotama all season in the woods, fresh snow, groomed and bumps. I weigh 130lbs and skied a 176cm... It was perfect for all of those conditions and just getting back into the game in general.

 

At the end of the season the only thing I really craved was something that will handle a little more speed so I bought 183's.

 

Note: Before last season I also bought 175cm Fischer carving skis that are 65mm under foot and have a 13 or 14 meter radius. They are enjoyable due to how easy they are to carve a turn, but beyond that they didn't make sense for me. I'm usually seeking out soft snow more than groomed slopes. Also I preferred the width of the Gotama a lot more than the carviness of the Fischer.

 

Ultimately you'll have to figure out what makes the most sense and a lot will depend on your style. I found it helped to go into shops in September to flex and fondle a bunch of different skis. I never would have settled on the Gotama if I hadn't done this. I was originally thinking I would get something 90mm wide as my "powder" skis... yeah right. Now I have 125mm Volkl Sumos for that and 90mm would be my ice ski if I had a pair that skinny.

 

Good luck.

 

 

 

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

I ordered a set of 184 cm Dynastar Contact 4X4's last night.  My other choice was the K2 Apache Crossfires.  I will probably only have one set of skis, so I think I made the best choice.  

 

Last weekend I happened to be in Rutland Vermont mountain biking so I drove over to Killington just because I haven't there in 10 years.   I was never big fan of Killington just because of the huge crowds there, I'd rather keep driving and go to Sugerbush or MRG.

Anyhow, I got sort of amped up and I really want to go skiing now.  This is going to be a long summer.

 

post #8 of 9

You should have visited the Snow Shack while at Killington. They have some awesome off-season deals there.

 

Karl

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

Driving up Killington Road was really wierd.  Every business was closed and there were no other cars driving.   Part of the reason I drove up was to stop at some of the ski shops and try to find a deal on some skis.  I was a little bent that evrything was closed. 

I didn't realize that the summer schedule doesn't start for about another month.


Edited by unclejoe900 - 6/5/2009 at 10:58 pm GMT
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