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What helps you keep cadence? - Page 2

post #31 of 41

Sorry, even slower 28th Rob Vorhees. Still smoked ya. And not the point.

I don't want this to turn into some kind of Ritchie vs Yuki thing.

Since, I write up exercise regimines daily, and feel that you may benefit from interval training, I obviously know nothing.

In my know nothingness, I would say that your cadence is probably pretty good. Not that it couldn't use some work, most everyones could. Most mountain bikers develope a pretty good cadence from maintaining traction during climbs. It creates a good 'feel for the wheel.'

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fartlek



Any training regimine is going to extoll some benefit from intervals, pyramids whatever you want to call them. The trick is to mix it up (shocking principle by one name) and still keep some kind of regimine.

The month of mud....8 miles right? The shortest sport class wvmba races are at 16 miles? 8 miles is an all out sprint to me.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




dude people killed me that day that normally dont stand a chance in a normal lenght XC race against me. I do intervals all the time but they help XC racing not ultra/enduro racing.your were  neck neck against Bill "stick boy" westover are you sure about that? FYI he is my teammate and an equal match in normal lenght XC racing against me.

look at Bill Westover Stick the 20th from Big Bear listed here time.


http://monthofmud.org/?page_id=64

Bill = 1:01
Me =  00:46:23

http://monthofmud.org/?page_id=75

Bill(listed under watson) =1:10:18
Me = 1:12:52

so yeah he was very similar to me last year.

This year at Big bear he had an 1 hour and 45 minutes up on me. something wasnt right that day. So I mean if your were neck and against that guy youd be right up there with me in normal race and probably kill me after 1:30. I honestly doubt your keeping up with stickboy on a daily basis.

its all bench racing but to sit here and call me out due to what I admit was a bad race, and even said so as I posted in on this site is really really low. I  realize I am much better short distance racer than long distance right now and intervals(something I do all season long) wont make you a better enduro racer. Base mileage does. I should have had enough, something wasnt right or I just plain suck at longer distances. All you have to go is go back and look who I normally beat at XC races then see how much they beat at big bear to see "something wasnt right"



 
post #32 of 41



Edited by BushwackerinPA - 8/21/09 at 11:36am
post #33 of 41
Let's put it this way.  A 6 day stage ride with an average of 6k of climbing a day is a lot different than riding a single century, or even a single race.  A multiday tour is all about recovery day to day, which is the name of the game in a stage race.

Mike
post #34 of 41
 Remember the TdF where they had the TT up Alpe d'Huez? Lance used interval training for that. His coaches figured he'd need X watts Let's say 450) for Y minutes (let's just say 60) to win the TT. He couldn't do that, so the way to train for it was not to do 400 watts for an our and then try to increase watts. It was to do the full wattage and start making the intervals longer until he could do it for an hour.
post #35 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 Remember the TdF where they had the TT up Alpe d'Huez? Lance used interval training for that. His coaches figured he'd need X watts Let's say 450) for Y minutes (let's just say 60) to win the TT. He couldn't do that, so the way to train for it was not to do 400 watts for an our and then try to increase watts. It was to do the full wattage and start making the intervals longer until he could do it for an hour.

I always thought those are called lactic acid blocks, _not_ intervals.

post #36 of 41
 OK, then I'd say that Interval training is probably not what BWPA needs to do to improve his endurance racing. Unless he finds that he is unable to respond to high-intensity attacks and that is what is hurting his races.
post #37 of 41



Edited by BushwackerinPA - 8/21/09 at 11:36am
post #38 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

I need more base mileage, despite my tons already..... endurance doesnt come in weeks or months it takes years....
 

Maybe you are right.    

But  I also think that trying to get that base during the season is shooting oneself in the foot.  

Somehow or other you want to arrive at the start of next season with more base miles and more muscle both. 

I don't know what that will mean for your skiing.
post #39 of 41
Interval training improves endurance. There are all sorts of interval work outs. Most workouts have a day or 2 of interval training weekly, depending on the phase of the training cycle. Interval training is just one component of a training cycle. (as are distance days) To use a race as part of your workout is fine. I would suggest the workout is incomplete, without additional interval training. Again, it is just one component, and the intervals should be variable (in intensity, and duration) from week to week.

The big picture is to get out the calender; record the races you are going to do next year, log what workouts, and when on the calender.

If you want to get faster, stronger, you need to regiment your workouts.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




yeah excactly if you look at my short Mountain bike races I do well. I interval train all the time.

I need more base mileage, despite my tons already..... endurance doesnt come in weeks or months it takes years....

 
post #40 of 41
Johnny is giving you good advice here.  Bike racing is not like other endurance sports.  Road racing requires bursts of power followed by recovery due to the pack dynamics.  Mountain biking can be more steady, but a course with  short, hard hills followed by technical decents will have similar requirements.  One cannot train for this by slogging way at long hard miles.  That is part of it, but just part.

New racers in both events are forever complaining about coming in behind racers they claim to be stronger and faster than.  That's just it....they are coming in behind racers, not riders.

It seems every new rider thinks they are a time trial specialist.  Really, they are just not trained to race.

The amazing thing about race training is how it does lift your speed in the steady grind.  Once your max is raised, the steady effort is a lower % of your max and becomes easier to maintain.
post #41 of 41
Josh, when you say you need to improve your endurance, what do you mean?  Are you bonking?  If so, then that might be symptomatic of too little base training (not too few miles, but too few miles in zones 1 and 2).

Here is an interesting article by Mark Allen.  In this case, he is looking to base training to increase the efficiency of the body in burning fat rather than glycogen.  http://www.markallenonline.com/heartrate.asp  As I've started to understand training, a good part of the purpose of base training is to do just that.  But note that to get the results from this sort of base training in developing muscular endurance, you've actually got to slow down your workout.  Eventually it (and you) will get faster.

Mike
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