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Dolphin Turns

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Whats the story behind the Dolphin Turn? Here is a demo:

 

http://vimeo.com/3595143

 

I wonder what kind of movements are used to perform it. It looks like a mogul turn without moguls. It looks very cool to me. Or should it be avoided at all cost?

 

 

Video added by T-Square


Edited by T-Square - 5/12/2009 at 08:19 pm GMT
post #2 of 17

Well the guy demoing it is only one of the best skiers on the planet, numerous top finishes in World Level Tech Champs.  So I would suggest avoiding this exercise....you might risk improving.

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post

Well the guy demoing it is only one of the best skiers on the planet, numerous top finishes in World Level Tech Champs.  So I would suggest avoiding this exercise....you might risk improving.

Who is it? It looks so easy. LOL, are you sure this exercise would improve my skiing... In general or in some sertain area ?

 

post #4 of 17

its for feeling the fore-aft balance. They are very difficult to acheive at first and if you don't have someone to correct you the tendency is to go right in the backseat.

 

It's a good exercise but it doesnt work for me

post #5 of 17

In practice:

 

http://vimeo.com/3391730

 

 

Video added by T-Square


Edited by T-Square - 5/12/2009 at 08:21 pm GMT
post #6 of 17

You can master dolphin turns fairly easily by breaking them down into parts... first in a straight line or traverse, practise wheelies (or just pushing the feet forward until the tips come off) then practise the wheelie followed with a bit of a retraction so the ski tips land first. Practise over a small bump if your having trouble as this will make it easier. Once you have the move, you can put it into turns... big slow ones at first, then built up to short turns like Steve Smart demostrates in the video.

Dolphins are great for getting those ankle moving.

post #7 of 17

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skinerd View Post

like Steve Smart demostrates in the video.


Its amazing how when you know peoples skiing you can pick them by just seeing their knees down.
 

post #8 of 17

:

 

But of course there are those on here that will still insist that the CSIA is all about a fixed, static, ankle position!

 

But back to the topic:

Dolphin Turns, is probably the best drill ever, for the best bump skiing and short radius turns.

 

post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post

In practice:

 

http://vimeo.com/3391730

Pivot entry turn?

 

post #10 of 17

 

post #11 of 17

In the first clip he's buttering the tail to help achieve lift.

post #12 of 17
I have tried this technique and i just cannot get the tips to rise up. It feels like my tips are nailed to the slope and advice on how i can unweight to achieve this?
post #13 of 17

Dolphin turns fascinate me. I've seen them done badly very often, and very, very rarely done well. Seems to be mostly a CSIA level 4 competency...

 

I'm trying to figure out how the demoer generates any rise off the ground.

 

1 - flex in the knees/hips and abrupt extension to rise off the ground

2 - stabilize some/most of the body weight against the planted pole

3 - aggressively pull the tips off the snow by pulling the toes up, perhaps leaning back a bit--once off the ground, rock forward

 

The narrative I've heard before that uses the analogy of "pedaling a bicycle backwards" suggests that 1 and 3 are factors...

 

any other thoughts on factors on succeeding at dolphin turns?

post #14 of 17

Reminds me of a "bunny hop" on a bike...

post #15 of 17



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Dolphin turns fascinate me. I've seen them done badly very often, and very, very rarely done well. Seems to be mostly a CSIA level 4 competency...

 

I'm trying to figure out how the demoer generates any rise off the ground.

 

1 - flex in the knees/hips and abrupt extension to rise off the ground

2 - stabilize some/most of the body weight against the planted pole

3 - aggressively pull the tips off the snow by pulling the toes up, perhaps leaning back a bit--once off the ground, rock forward

 

The narrative I've heard before that uses the analogy of "pedaling a bicycle backwards" suggests that 1 and 3 are factors...

 

any other thoughts on factors on succeeding at dolphin turn
 

 

post #16 of 17

Jamt's video is what I was referring to when I referenced pedaling a bicycle backwards. But... there must be more to a dolphin turn than what's described in the video. 

 

It looks like the demoer takes the dolphin turn into bumps like this...

 

The legs come forward as the skier hits the backside of the bump--so the tips rise up the backside

The crest of the bump matches the apex of the hop in the dolphin turn

The tips come down the frontside of the bump

 

 

Is this a decent representation of how the dolphin turn maps to a mogul? 

post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Jamt's video is what I was referring to when I referenced pedaling a bicycle backwards. But... there must be more to a dolphin turn than what's described in the video. 

 

It looks like the demoer takes the dolphin turn into bumps like this...

 

The legs come forward as the skier hits the backside of the bump--so the tips rise up the backside

The crest of the bump matches the apex of the hop in the dolphin turn

The tips come down the frontside of the bump

 

 

Is this a decent representation of how the dolphin turn maps to a mogul? 


This is correct. Its also something that is refered to as "back pedalling". One thing that people have a hard time understanding is that as you flex your legs and retract them towrds you your legs come forward. Just like your accurate observation above. When you ski the more technical line in bumps, over the crests and not in the rutt, you do need to flex more. Im not really sure if the dolphine turn is such a good drill as claimed in the video for health reasons but it sure will help you ski in bumps.

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