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Contemporary skis that will stand the test of time - Page 3

post #61 of 82

and we all know, sometimes it's fun to handicap yourself (older skis, never boots) ,and then lay down some sh$#, just to raise an eyebrow or two

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

As is often said here...by those in the know...

 

"It's the Indian, not the bow"

 



 

post #62 of 82
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Winter View Post

I thought that this thread was about skis that you would still want to take out, not whether they would literally be worn out from use in 10-15years. Could the model still provide the same fun/thrill or would the design no longer be useful. If that were the case I bet my Stockli XLs from 04/05 will still have some life in them, and therefore I nominate them. But again I think it's what ski would you still want to ride.

The original idea was to imagine which skis we are on today that will hold value, and still ski well 10 or 15 years from now.

 

As all good discussion, there will be different views, which is great.

You mentioned two lines of skis.  IMHO the Volkl724 line will not hold up in quality or value over a 10 year period of time.

As Davluri said, they tend to lose camber and soften over just a few seasons.

 

That being said, does anyone think that a cap ski can/should be on this list?  I have my doubts.

 

post #63 of 82

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

and we all know, sometimes it's fun to handicap yourself (older skis, never boots) ,and then lay down some sh$#, just to raise an eyebrow or two



 

The handicap in my case is the skier.....not the skis, straight or otherwise

post #64 of 82

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

 

The original idea was to imagine which skis we are on today that will hold value, and still ski well 10 or 15 years from now.

 

As all good discussion, there will be different views, which is great.

You mentioned two lines of skis.  IMHO the Volkl724 line will not hold up in quality or value over a 10 year period of time.

As Davluri said, they tend to lose camber and soften over just a few seasons.

 

That being said, does anyone think that a cap ski can/should be on this list?  I have my doubts.

 


Colorado built Volants

post #65 of 82

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

 

That being said, does anyone think that a cap ski can/should be on this list?  I have my doubts.

 


I don't think the "cap" aspect alone is an issue, plus or minus.  There have been some great cap skis in recent years (RX-8, RX-9 for example, or Dynastars with hybrid cap/sidewall construction).

post #66 of 82

Quote:

Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

 

The original idea was to imagine which skis we are on today that will hold value, and still ski well 10 or 15 years from now.

 

As all good discussion, there will be different views, which is great.

You mentioned two lines of skis.  IMHO the Volkl724 line will not hold up in quality or value over a 10 year period of time.

As Davluri said, they tend to lose camber and soften over just a few seasons.

 

That being said, does anyone think that a cap ski can/should be on this list?  I have my doubts.

 

First, any ski 'that we're on now' will be tuned to death way before it becomes skied out... seems silly to say that any modern ski will still perform at a top level after 10 to 15 seasons. It doesn't matter how well it's made, if it is used and maintained it will not have ANY value after 10 years of use.

 

As far as cap skis? Yes, I think that Atomic race skis are as good or better than anything else made. Salomon makes some great freeride stuff that's capped... sidewalls don't mean sh*t!!!

post #67 of 82

I'll second Colorado Volant nomination. I've bought five pair of skis (thinner, fatter, softer, stiffer, shorter) since I bought the Volants. My old PowerKarvs's bindings don't fit my later model boots. (went smaller and tighter with my boots) About once a year I break out the old skis and an old pair of boot's and inevitably think, "Damn these are still my best skis". After I break'em out I usually ski them a second or third day or until my feet get sore and I go back to my new boots!

post #68 of 82

I think we need to define "contemporary". Colorado built Volants are great and waaayyy ahead of other skis at the time. They are not contemporary, IMO.

 

Michael

post #69 of 82
Thread Starter 

We, sort of, discussed it earlier, and though you're right about the Volants, as a designation of contemporary, they will most definitely stand up in the test of time.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post

I think we need to define "contemporary". Colorado built Volants are great and waaayyy ahead of other skis at the time. They are not contemporary, IMO.

 

Michael

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

BTW, maybe we should define contemporary as skis available for sale as 2008/2009 models, or upcoming 2009/2010 models, just to narrow the field?  In other words the current (waning) season and next season?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Skier219, you're on the right track, afterall, I think the 05-06 Gotama will stand the test of time, but I wonder if the current changes in the Goat will become "just another rockered ski".

 

IMO the 06-05(perhaps the 06-07 - IIRC they are nearly the same) Gotama will be sought after long after the goat is not the goat anymore. 

 

post #70 of 82

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

We, sort of, discussed it earlier, and though you're right about the Volants, as a designation of classics, they will most definitely stand up in the test of time.


Fixed it for you.

post #71 of 82

Is intesting that most all the skis being tossed in the mix are from the same lines that we would have talked about 10-20-30 years ago.  Deffinately a statement to experience, marketing, and the abbility to buy out competitors.  

 

We will all remember fondly; a Head, a Volkl, a K2, a Rossie, a Dynastar, a Fisher, a Blizzard, an Elan. In 10-20-30 years it will probalblly be the same list.  Hope there will be some durrable additions like Solomon to the list Variety is a very good thing.  These folks all make skis that make me feel like the master of my universe, and would happily ski the rest of my life.

 

Forgive the ommisions to this list I am old and forget stuff.

post #72 of 82
Thread Starter 

Since I have little/no experience on some of the "re-newed" lines, I have to ask.....

What about Kastle? 

post #73 of 82

They defiantly belong.  Sorry I forgot.  They were my faves in the mid 60's and other times to.  Volant better get there too.

 

Same excuse, I'm old, I forgot

post #74 of 82

First, some skis are saved by skiing them only with good coverage, only on piste, only for racing, only when they will not be damaged by rocks etc, while other skis in the quiver are used daily off piste in lighter coverage, thin base layer, and sketchy, rocky conditions.

 

Here in Tahoe, we may ski more rocks in a day than some skiers encounter in a season. hard on the boards, classic or otherwise. No ski used daily off-piste can survive intact, point taken. However...

 

Many classics, Volkl G-30,G-40 or Explosivs for example, enjoy extended longevity as go-to-rock-skis, even with core shots and trashed edges. But these classic rock skis retain solid flex, stiffness, structural soundness, bindings firmly mounted, edges still in the ski.

 

Just saying, from personal experience with models I have owned, the tortion box construction/caps  don't hold up even as long as the edges.

 

Exceptions to averages will always exist, but they don't mean sh@t in the greater scheme of things (our inclination to purchase this or that). WR, you seem irrationally sensitive to the sidewall/cap debate. A professional thorn in your paw?

 

That said, using skis that old is itself an exception for most skiers, but it is the intention of the OP to examine that hypothesis, so where's the harm? 

 

Fire up the GTO! Still goes hella fast!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Quote:

First, any ski 'that we're on now' will be tuned to death way before it becomes skied out... seems silly to say that any modern ski will still perform at a top level after 10 to 15 seasons. It doesn't matter how well it's made, if it is used and maintained it will not have ANY value after 10 years of use.

 

As far as cap skis? Yes, I think that Atomic race skis are as good or better than anything else made. Salomon makes some great freeride stuff that's capped... sidewalls don't mean sh*t!!!

 

post #75 of 82

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

First, some skis are saved by skiing them only with good coverage, only on piste, only for racing, only when they will not be damaged by rocks etc, while other skis in the quiver are used daily off piste in lighter coverage, thin base layer, and sketchy, rocky conditions.

 

Here in Tahoe, we may ski more rocks in a day than some skiers encounter in a season. hard on the boards, classic or otherwise. No ski used daily off-piste can survive intact, point taken. However...

 

Many classics, Volkl G-30,G-40 or Explosivs for example, enjoy extended longevity as go-to-rock-skis, even with core shots and trashed edges. But these classic rock skis retain solid flex, stiffness, structural soundness, bindings firmly mounted, edges still in the ski.

 

Just saying, from personal experience with models I have owned, the tortion box construction/caps  don't hold up even as long as the edges.

 

Exceptions to averages will always exist, but they don't mean sh@t in the greater scheme of things (our inclination to purchase this or that). WR, you seem irrationally sensitive to the sidewall/cap debate. A professional thorn in your paw?

 

That said, using skis that old is itself an exception for most skiers, but it is the intention of the OP to examine that hypothesis, so where's the harm? 

 

Fire up the GTO! Still goes hella fast!

 

 

 

 

Yep, those old race skis are still fast and handle speed quite well, even if not quite as well as they did when new.


As I recall it, the Judge was slow; the Road-Runner and SuperBee were fast.  Mind you at the time of the earlier GTOs, they were relatively fast straight out of the box.  Unless you are referring to one of the Italian GTOs.

post #76 of 82

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Quote:

if it is used and maintained it will not have ANY value after 10 years of use.

 

By "used" are you including clowns like me that have 10 pair of skis but only ski 5 to 10 days a year?  It is entirely probable that even my favorite ski would only have about 50 full days' use and 20 tunes on it in 15 years. Also, what about the "one day wonders" that you find on craigslist where someone bought it 10 or 15 years ago and used it on one ski trip then it sat in the ski bag in a closet until the yard sale 15 years later?  So back to the question of what might still be worth $100.00 in 15 years adding that to the scenario.  Even though I lean towards older gear for economic reasons, there aren't many skis over 10 years old that I would pay $100 for even with working bindings.  A 2009 hart F-17 in is one I might pay $100.00 for in fifteen years, assuming it isn't trashed like you say.

post #77 of 82

There is nothing out right now that I am considering "stockpiling".  

post #78 of 82

That would be a 389 cu in GTO, three duces, progressive linkage, posi, street racing machine and chick magnet, out of the box. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

 

 

Yep, those old race skis are still fast and handle speed quite well, even if not quite as well as they did when new.


As I recall it, the Judge was slow; the Road-Runner and SuperBee were fast.  Mind you at the time of the earlier GTOs, they were relatively fast straight out of the box.  Unless you are referring to one of the Italian GTOs.



 

post #79 of 82
Thread Starter 

^^^^^^^ That post needs a Tim Allen Grunt in the background. 

post #80 of 82

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

There is nothing out right now that I am considering "stockpiling".  


I have never been a stockpiler. I've always wanted new gear. People like VA intrigue me.
 

 

But, I will admit I have a soft spot in my heart for some of the last german volkls.

 

I would buy a non-mounted Sumo with the black leather topsheet. That would go in my den and definetely stand the test of time. I'm also considering buying a Sanouk (either samurai or natural wood) just to have it to ski on random resort blizzard days. But, I can't justify 400+ for an unmounted ski that old when funshape companies offer pre-season prices that beat that.

post #81 of 82

I might stockpile a few pairs of Aggressor 150s now that Nordica has moved away from the toes-out stance. Does that count? 

post #82 of 82
Thread Starter 

That does count.

I thought seriously about trying the aggressor as an option, and would be bummed if I had fallen in love with it only to have it discontinued. 

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