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Great older skis - Page 2

post #31 of 59

I have these in 195cm and keep them waxed and tuned (reasonably) and though they don't see a lot of snow, they are truly fun for mountain runs at speed. On firm, they are definitely faster than anything modern I ski, length and sidecut I supose (I only have shaped and fat skis, 176cm or shorter, nothing race). I dig the Austrian names and symbols in the top sheet: Rohrmoser, the 'A' with germanic wings, and so forth.

 

They seem to have remained stiff and true, now at 20+ years and over 100 ski days. My dilemna is: do I spend a $100 (variation on the would you pay $100 for purchase) for a race base grind and edge tune? (probably not)

 

Old timer's warm moment: the kids were running super G training and I was skiing the Red Sleds on an adjacent face. I rode up with a group of them and one kid said: "Hey man I saw you. I have to run those today!" nice kid.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by goblue View Post

Atomic Skis 84-85

 

The mid-80's Red Sleds are absolute classics, though they were a bit too much ski for me.

 

I preferred the SL's, and I'd probably still ski them if I still had mid-80's knees and quads.

 

I think that both stand the test of time as great skis. I see them show up on E-Bay and Craigslist from time to time.

 

(Credits to Midwest Pete for the scan from the 84-85 Winter Park Collection)

 



 

post #32 of 59

bit of a de-rail here, but bear with me. Bill Johnson was propelled to the top of the sport  by winning a very easy downhill in the Olympic venue (goblu's posted image). IMO, this pressured him to perform in more technical and dangerous races, ending in tragedy. How wierd is that?!

 

I'm totally flamable here as this is shere speculation.

post #33 of 59

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

bit of a de-rail here, but bear with me. Bill Johnson was propelled to the top of the sport  by winning a very easy downhill in the Olympic venue (goblu's posted image). IMO, this pressured him to perform in more technical and dangerous races, ending in tragedy. How wierd is that?!

 

I'm totally flamable here as this is shere speculation.


I agree with you -- I think that's one of the reasons why the Europeans never took a liking to him.
 

 

At age 40 Bill came back pretty ripped but then was seriously injured -- off hand do you know how he is getting along (I suppose I need to do some web research).

post #34 of 59

He beat the rest of the best skiers in the world on that day, that's what the Olympics are all about. He won a race (the Lauberhorn) a few weeks earlier at Wengen becoming the FIRST American male to do so... he won two more WC's in 1984 finishing 3rd overall in DH for the season.

 

The accident occured in 2001, 17 years later.

 

I skied with Bill three years ago, quite a character.

post #35 of 59

I don't know how his come-back injury resolved in the long run. Very nice guy, I'm sure. His grin when he won was so: Gee, I can't believe this is happening to me! Best to him. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MidwestPete View Post

 


I agree with you -- I think that's one of the reasons why the Europeans never took a liking to him.
 

 

At age 40 Bill came back pretty ripped but then was seriously injured -- off hand do you know how he is getting along (I suppose I need to do some web research).



 

post #36 of 59

I didn't know about Wengen or the overall WC, so I am indeed an idiot, and unintentionally disrespectful,sorry, and apologies to Bill. Still, it was not a proper course for that level of racer, correct? as in, anyone there could have won with good wax and fast skis (pictured), which is not the case at Kitz, etc. Fame is a two edged sword, though.

 

Expressing ignorance here: the head injury 17 years later was the second of two devastating falls, correct, the first was after the Olympics,  while he was in his active period inclusive of his Olympic victory. Or not, sorry for not just reading the history, relying instead on fallible grey matter.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

He beat the rest of the best skiers in the world on that day, that's what the Olympics are all about. He won a race (the Lauberhorn) a few weeks earlier at Wengen becoming the FIRST American male to do so... he won two more WC's in 1984 finishing 3rd overall in DH for the season.

 

The accident occured in 2001, 17 years later.

 

I skied with Bill three years ago, quite a character.



 

post #37 of 59

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

bit of a de-rail here, but bear with me. Bill Johnson was propelled to the top of the sport  by winning a very easy downhill in the Olympic venue (goblu's posted image). IMO, this pressured him to perform in more technical and dangerous races, ending in tragedy. How wierd is that?!

 

I'm totally flamable here as this is shere speculation.

As WR said, the other racers were also skiing the same course. There are courses that favor technical racers and gliders, some times its better to have an early start or a later start. There is some luck involved during the Olympics, it's have you capitalize on that luck. 

post #38 of 59

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

He beat the rest of the best skiers in the world on that day, that's what the Olympics are all about. He won a race (the Lauberhorn) a few weeks earlier at Wengen becoming the FIRST American male to do so... he won two more WC's in 1984 finishing 3rd overall in DH for the season.

 

The accident occured in 2001, 17 years later.

 

I skied with Bill three years ago, quite a character.


Why doesn't this surprise me? 

I recall watching the Olympics when Bill Johnson showed up with his "character".  I can honestly say, he's one of the reasons I learned to ski.

 

post #39 of 59

Agree ^^^, there is always a degree of racing luck, in cycling also for example. That is why a competitor has to race a lot, ensuring that some day the luck will go his way, and he will know how to handle (exploit) it.

 

However, some courses have less room for luck, ensuring that the best will have their clear chance to win. When the Olympic course is a gliders' free-for-all, the repercussions down the road may be unanticipated for a racer who is favored by luck and showered by adulation.

 

Again, respect to Bill, just saying about Olympic courses and many gullible American spectators in particular,  in a sport where WC is the standard that competitors most respect.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

 

As WR said, the other racers were also skiing the same course. There are courses that favor technical racers and gliders, some times its better to have an early start or a later start. There is some luck involved during the Olympics, it's have you capitalize on that luck. 



 

post #40 of 59

cross posting

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

 


I still love to take out my old 1st Generation Kästle National Team Super-G skis.  In 10 or 15 years time I will still enjoy them.  They are one truly great ski for skiing at warp speed (the 208s that is, shorter ones weren't quite stable enough), and they could turn much better than any DH board.  Anybody who doesn't think they turned great, just didn't ski fast enough (Phil ).  Sure, the modern shaped skis make nicer slow turns, but that's not what these were made for.

 

I am also quite impressed with my 2002 190 cm Volant Machete G.  They make going between 15 and 55 mph feel great AND they can also smear turns and handle bumps quite effortlessly to boot.  So long as you don't ask them to carve on ice you're laughing.  Being much more lively than the SGs, they add a bit of a fun-factor, or kick when your not pushing SG or DH speeds, speeds where the SGs are kinda "ho-hum, wake me up when you want to ski a little faster".

 

My Fischer WC SCs ARE great at making short turns on a hard surface.  I'm sure they will be just as good at it in 15 years.

 

If a ski comes down the pipe that can do it all, I'll consider relegating these skis to the scrap pile, but I can't see it happening anytime soon.

 

 

 



 

post #41 of 59

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I didn't know about Wengen or the overall WC, so I am indeed an idiot, and unintentionally disrespectful,sorry, and apologies to Bill. Still, it was not a proper course for that level of racer, correct? as in, anyone there could have won with good wax and fast skis (pictured), which is not the case at Kitz, etc. Fame is a two edged sword, though.

 

Expressing ignorance here: the head injury 17 years later was the second of two devastating falls, correct, the first was after the Olympics,  while he was in his active period inclusive of his Olympic victory. Or not, sorry for not just reading the history, relying instead on fallible grey matter.

 

 



 

Bill Johnson won most if not all the DH training runs that week at the 84 Olympics. He was favered to win the race by those in the know. He was the best not only that day but that week. He had a great year in 84 and he was the the best downhill glider and won the races that were set up that way. It wasn't luck, wax or skis.

post #42 of 59

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

He won a race (the Lauberhorn) a few weeks earlier at Wengen

 

I very clearly remember watching that race from my college dorm room. Good example for me of how you just never know, when they're happening, which moments in life - sometimes so banal-seeming at the time - are going to stick with you and form part of your world view.

 

Anyway, regardless of whether hard-core World Cup followers think of Bill Johnson as one of the decade's great skiers or not, you have to respect the ability and drive of someone who gets himself into a position such that he competes successfully in even one of these races.

post #43 of 59

I remember back in the late 80s/early 90s, Research Dynamics (RD) had a ski called the Bad Dog.  Some hard core women liked the ski so much that RD made a run of smaller sizes called the Bad B*tch.

 

Dennis

post #44 of 59

My first expert skis were the Rossi 7G followed a few years later by the Volkl P10RS I remember having

a fall on my first run on the P10s but I was able to work out how they were to be skied from the way I fell.

Today I am a fan of stiff Mid Fats Volkl AC4 type skis due to grooming not being as frequent in recent years where I ski.

post #45 of 59

Regarding Bill Johnson:

 

In 1984, in a string of 5 top-level downhills (World Cup and Olympics) he placed: 1st, 4th, 1st, 1st and 1st.

 

On the World Cup, if he'd scored just 8 more points, he would have won the DH globe. All he would've needed to do was to place 8th or better in one of those six other downhill races.

 

For a brief time, he was the best downhill racer in the world. Why that time was so brief is an interesting question.

post #46 of 59

If you read the small print in the Atomic ad, a bit of marketing hype, since the Atomic Bionic Team RS was the known as the "Red Sled" not the AF pictured (abfahrt = Downhill)

 

I skied the 203cm Atomic ARC Bionic Team Slalom back them. I worked at a shop at the time and scored a pair of 25th Anniversary Bionic Team slaloms with a hat & a T-shirt! for $125.00. The skis had special graphics Black/Silver/Yellow and 25th Anniversary Graphic on them.

 

 

1st time I skied on them,  I hit a rock and blew out the side wall and bent the edge. Atomic warrantied them and sent me the light metallic blue SL, next year's ski, since you could no longer get the 25th Ann. Edition! They were sold out!

 

 

Also had a pair of matching light metallic blue 215cm SG's.. got pulled over twice in one day by the Crystal Mt. ski patrol on those tanks!  they didn't appreciate me being in a tuck on them!

 

The dual core, separated by a sheet of metal, with different wood material and config above and below the center metal sheet,  was quite a concept back then. Then came Beta construction and now the Double Deck.......

 

 


Edited by Atomicman - 5/5/2009 at 06:30 pm GMT


Edited by Atomicman - 3/26/17 at 10:38am
post #47 of 59

 

 When the Olympic course is a gliders' free-for-all, the repercussions down the road may be unanticipated for a racer who is favored by luck and showered by adulation.

 

Again, respect to Bill, just saying about Olympic courses and many gullible American spectators in particular,  in a sport where WC is the standard that competitors most respect.

 

 



 


This post reminds me of Franz Klammer

calling each other nose pickers that year.

 

I'm a fan of steep, technical courses too, but to pretend that the other courses don't count belittles the sport.

 

I race sailboats in the summer and I've always sailed better in heavy air.  That doesn't mean that light air sailing isn't part of the sport.

post #48 of 59

Pay $100 bucks for old skis....hmmm

The volant - the alum cap is probably worth that in commodities mkt....

btw - i have 10yr old volant superkarve for sale if your interested???? talk about a fast ski.....

my brother-in-law borrowed them last season and the speed scared the $$^$!!##& out of him. Old ski but can easily keep up with any new ski.

 

I have to say that the Vokl allstars were a ski i tested many years ago that i wished i bought. would they qualify?

post #49 of 59

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Denny1969 View Post

I remember back in the late 80s/early 90s, Research Dynamics (RD) had a ski called the Bad Dog.  Some hard core women liked the ski so much that RD made a run of smaller sizes called the Bad B*tch.

 

Dennis


There was a pair of these...

Bad Dog and Bad B*tch, on Ebay a while back.  I thought about bidding on them but wondered what on earth I'd do with them.

 

post #50 of 59

I bought the MBx 16 light speed 2 months ago. They were in their original packaging un opened...need to find a binding for them as my new bindings un-opened still in box...are stil yet un-indemnified....due to their age of stock.  Anyway I was told it was a bump ski ...which is what I wanted...(an old bump ski) can you tell me a little or a lot about the history of the ski....and is their anyway to get around getting my new un-indemnified bindings put on with even like signing a legal wavier with someone or something like that.. Thanks in advance.

post #51 of 59

Also what binding might you recommend from today's market for that older much skinnier ski waist...about a 62 or 63  ??

post #52 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiwest81 View Post
 

I bought the MBx 16 light speed 2 months ago. They were in their original packaging un opened...need to find a binding for them as my new bindings un-opened still in box...are stil yet un-indemnified....due to their age of stock.  Anyway I was told it was a bump ski ...which is what I wanted...(an old bump ski) can you tell me a little or a lot about the history of the ski....and is their anyway to get around getting my new un-indemnified bindings put on with even like signing a legal wavier with someone or something like that.. Thanks in advance.

 

Umm...no, not a bump-specific ski, it was a light weight all-rounder.   Very soft core so it /could/ work as a bump ski - assuming you want to work a 200cm ski through modern bumps.             

 

I'd suggest a 12-din binding with a race brake.

post #53 of 59


Thank you for getting back to me ...I have a K2 - 244 / Mamba mogul sister ski ...the ski that is called the  "K2 Extreme" ski from the mid - late nineties...I have 2 pairs one in mint cond. and one not so much mint condition. I ski it in a 204 and a 200 as well...Love it..but I thought this mbx might be a nice middle range cross over ski with more emphasis on bump action.. I like the " Beefy Frisky-ness" of the old style mogul skis...but I want to now "speed ski carve" a lot more often since my cousin who I'll be traveling a lot with on trips likes to carve a lot more than I and I love the bumps and jumps combo runs...but I know I have to share the different mountain style interests with him on the road ski trips we've planned to make it more enjoyable  ...so when I saw this (MBX) ski on ebay in it's unwrapped condition I thought well let's try it...Then I saw your post along with the other gentleman's comments about liking this ski a lot back then. So I thought .let me reach out and try to ask about your feedback.  ..Thanks again...

post #54 of 59

Snow Rangers!

post #55 of 59

I ski on Atomic Beta Carv 10 20s at 195 or 200 cm and will gladly pay $100 for a pair in good order. They are early carvers but are able to track well at speed on groomers.

 

I guess they are 15 years + now.

post #56 of 59
Quote:
 I bought the MBx 16 light speed 2 months ago. They were in their original packaging un opened...need to find a binding for them as my new bindings un-opened still in box...are stil yet un-indemnified....due to their age of stock.  Anyway I was told it was a bump ski ...which is what I wanted...(an old bump ski) can you tell me a little or a lot about the history of the ski....and is their anyway to get around getting my new un-indemnified bindings put on with even like signing a legal wavier with someone or something like that.. Thanks in advance.

Skiwest81

 

Those are Elan's right?   Those are Elan's cap ski from the early 90's.  Shoot, mount 'em and try 'em.   If they are 200cm, that would be a reasonable length for the bumps.

post #57 of 59

Yeah I was thinking I will mount them next season ..I would like to see them float a little on the crud and also muscle up a little bit of "frisky and  beefy" in the moguls...like a "tweener" if I can get that out of them...

post #58 of 59

I'm going to base this solely on how much fun I felt like I had at the time that I owned the skis.

 

K2 MX from the '90's some time. The ones with lava rock on the top sheet. Maybe not the best ski ever, but I loved them for some reason.

 

Bandit XXX from about 2003. The green ones. I skied them until they were floppy.

post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by TQA View Post
 

I ski on Atomic Beta Carv 10 20s at 195 or 200 cm and will gladly pay $100 for a pair in good order. They are early carvers but are able to track well at speed on groomers.

 

I guess they are 15 years + now.

 

Wow, I remember those, talk about a Cadillac ride.

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