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If you go far enough North, you get the Northern Lights...

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Here's some great photos of the northern lights I came across on the UK Telegraph website:

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/scienceandtechnology/scienceandtechnologypicturegall/5153963/Northern-lights-photographs-of-the-Aurora-Borealis-around-the-Arctic-Circle.html

 

Photos by Sylvain Serre at spaceweather.com

 

Also on his site at: http://unansalluit.com/english/index_en.html     - his photos from a year at Salluit.

 

 

Photo: Sylvain Serre  Salluit, Nunavik, Quebec, Canada, Mar. 22, 2009

 

 

Photo: Sylvain Serre, Salluit, Nunavik, Quebec, Canada Mar. 4, 2009

post #2 of 9

It'sa always an exceptionally beautiful thing to see...

That's one of the item I haven't yet ticked on my list...

post #3 of 9

We sometimes see northern lights here in New Hampshire although I would bet there are many here who have never seen them. One of the most spectacular displays I have ever seen was actually from Minneapolis, an urban area during an especially active period. I remember the shimmering curtains hanging above the horizon while on canoe trips to the Quetico and Bondary Waters. Really eerie.

The souls of dead eskimos are said to linger in the sky in these lights.

post #4 of 9

I recall back in 200-2001, Northern Lights were a common sight even as far south as northern California, as long as the sky was dark enough.  I haven't seen any at all for the last 4-5 years, and lately, the lights have been relatively rare to see, even in the northern latitudes.  The sun has been very inactive and is at a low-point for historical observations now I believe, and the latest SOHO images show no activity at all.  We're in solar cycle 24 and still waiting for any sign of activity.  Get ready for extended ski seasons.

 

post #5 of 9

We've seen them several times in Northern Michigan.  The most spectacular one was on the southern shore of Lake Superior.  It was amazing.  :)

post #6 of 9

Growing up in Alaska I remember a few times when my mom would wake up in the middle of the night and see them so she would wake me up, we'd bundle up and go for a drive out to the country because you can see them better when you don't have the city lights around you and we'd watch them dance.  Stop for a breakfast at Denny's on the way back to town and then go back to bed.  Some of my favorite childhood memories. 

post #7 of 9

Northern lights have been spied as far south as Houston, believe it or not...

Move here and you can experience hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, snow, AND the aurora borealis. We even have seismic activity from time to time. Amazing....

Visit before our governor secedes us from the US....you'll need a passport once he does....

 

BTW, I was told a long time ago I couldn't be a Texan because I wasn't born here. Now I thank God I'm not!

post #8 of 9

Quite a sight. Pictures just don't do them justice. At a Solar plasma peak burst they resemble a rainbow curtain that is being shaken with pulses of brillant colors and intensity.

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

Is there a certain time of night that it's more likely to happen? Never saw any in Montana, but then we were usually inside most of the night.

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