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using step in boots with regular bindings

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

my gf's burton si bindings wasn't cutting it when the snow got deep in utah last season. steping in on powder is next to impossible so we are gearing her up with a set of strap ons for 2010.

 

question is if the boots will work for the strap ins? the only difference i can tell is that the sole of the boot is a bit more stiff

post #2 of 12

My 2 cents is that this should be ok. But I'd wait and see how the rest of the peanut gallery chimes in. I have an old pair of Burton SI boots and bindings. I'd have been tempted to try this, but one of my boots split along the side from rolling in and out of the binding too forefully too many times.

post #3 of 12

Step one.


Take SI boots and SI binders and throw them in the trash.  Seriously, out of all the step in systems Burton's was the worst.  Not to mention that stuff has been out of circulation for at least a half decade now.

 

Step two.

 

Update her gear.  If you are on a budget, spend the money on the boots. Brands I would stay away from are DC and 32.  Both brands seem to have a much higher rate of warranty issues.  Also stay away from budget brand boots, like Morrow, Lamar, 5150.  They are even worse than the DC or 32 brands. 

 

Burton, Vans, Salomon, Nitro, Celsius, and some others all make a quality boot.  Look into a speed lace or BOA system.  If you go BOA (recommended) look into the Dual "focus" system.  It's much easier to get a great fit with that.  Of course regular old lace ups are fine.  BOA and most of the other speed lace systems are now very reliable and easy to use. 

 

Union, Raiden, Rome, Ride, and K2 all make great binders.  If you are looking for a quicker binder.  The K2 Auto, K2 Cinch, Flow, and Raiden all have quick entry models.  The K2 Auto being one that tightens the toe strap when you tighten the ankle.  They worked out the kinks from the first year's models this past season.  It's a very reliable and easy binder to set up.  With Flow, the Muse and above are good women's binders.  Stay away from their budget binders as those always seem to be the one's that have problems.  You might still have problems getting into them in deep snow too.

 

I can probably go on and on.  Find a good pair of boots for her, and then go binder shopping.  Most places are having insane sales right now, so you should be able to find quality gear at a good price.

post #4 of 12

You say Burton makes good boots while at the same time telling his GF to throw away her Burton boots.

post #5 of 12

On the one hand you have a boot that Burton decided did not live up to their high standards. On the other hand you have .... a boot. Everyone knows that a boot on the hand is worth two on the shelf. So don't fear Rod, after Sapient does the KC 2 step, those boots will be made for walking. There - have I covered enough cliches for ya?

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

i think step ins are okay as long as you are light. she's about 110 lbs and really appericates how quickly she's able to keep up with us (group of skiiers off the lift). it's the deep powder days when they suck tho.

post #7 of 12

Those boots are way too old.  Not a knock on Burton.  I'd say the same about 8 year old Vans, Salomon, whatever boots.  It's time for a new pair.  Lot's of huge improvements with the internal harness and liner to take advantage of these days.  Boots from even two years ago can fall behind.  I was shocked out how much better the internal harness and liner are on my new boots vs my two year old ones.  

 

Step in Burton boots were just not very good in the first place, but Burton does make some good boots.  The most important part is to get a boot that fits your foot properly.  That is why I recommended several brands as each brand fits differently.  What works for me, may not work for you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

You say Burton makes good boots while at the same time telling his GF to throw away her Burton boots.

 

post #8 of 12

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sapient007 View Post

i think step ins are okay as long as you are light. she's about 110 lbs and really appericates how quickly she's able to keep up with us (group of skiiers off the lift). it's the deep powder days when they suck tho.


Really?  It's too long for her to strap in (insert joke) for you guys?  Most skiers I ride with loosen the buckles on their boots for the chairlift ride.  I am generally in my binders before they are done tightening their boots.  Regardless, if time is the issue.  The Flow, K2 Cinch, Auto, and Raiden rear entry binders are pretty much as fast as the Burton SI binder.  I would throw the Ride Contraband binding in there, but it's more of a freestyle jib binder.  If she likes to ride park and rails, then it would be a good binder, but it's not really an all mountain binding.  Overall, I would say take a look at the K2 Auto and at Flow.  Flow being the quickest, but the auto is a little more traditional but I think it will be easier to use in deep pow conditions.

post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 

curious what you think about rome boots? i'm eyeing a set of rome boots with ride zeta bindings.. both insanly discounted..

 

also i'm curious to check out the burton supreme heat snowboard boot. seems like maybe too much of a good thing for < 100 bucks?

 

also any feedback on sizing? her burton boot is an 8

post #10 of 12

Rome boots are getting better.  As far as design goes, they seem bomber.  The biggest gripe right now is that they pack out super fast. Which all boots pack out, yet we seem to use them for a long time after that.  Probably can be solved with a semi custom foot bed if it becomes an issue. Just make sure they are not Rome first year boots.  Those were really off in terms of flex, support and such.  Seems to be the case with a lot of first year product.

 

The Supreme Heat?  Don't you mean >$100?  That is the one with the boot heater correct?  If she has poor circulation problems and her feet staying cold, then it might be a good boot for her.

 

As far as sizing goes, this is where your brick and mortar store outshines any online retailer.  Go to a shop with a good inventory and have her try on several different pairs and brands of boots.  Find out which one fits her foot best.  Sizing and such is going to be different brand to brand.

post #11 of 12

I have an old pair of Burton Step-In boots and bindings and they work fine (when you're in your sixties step-ins are an attractive option).  Having said that I use that setup only one or two times a season when I'm teaching and can't justify scrapping them for newer stuff. I primarily ride alpine (hardboot) boards.

 

If I were to go with a strap setup, I would not continue to use the step-in boots.  They are way too stiff for a strap type application.  At that point I'd bite the bullet and get better boots.  I've demoed a number of boots and find that the newer BOAs distribute the "lace" tension much better than the earlier models.

 

 

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

more question on boot sizing.

 

we went to extensive boot testing for her current step ins to have her boot size of 7.0 from burton.  are sizing different now from 2004-2005? her normal tennis shoe is a size 9 and it's a little surprising that she ended up with something 2 sizes back

 

edit: actually we were told to go 2 sizes back since the boot packs out

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