EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Can you cut carbon-composite poles
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Can you cut carbon-composite poles

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

Is it safe to cut off the top of a composite pole? The plan is to cut (2" off) with a fine tooth saw, check that no cracks have been created, sand the end smooth, coat end with 2 part epoxy, let dry and put the grip back on. (My kid bought them on sale but too long as he now realizes.)

 

I ask because the standard ski shop response has to be: no. (liability?), but is there any real danger of the pole blowing under stress? (I'm not the litigious type )

post #2 of 23

Yes.

 

2345

post #3 of 23

I just cut a pair the other day.  Soak the grip end in boiling water for a minute or so and they will slide right off.  Wrap the pole where you want to cut it with masking tape and saw with a fine toothed hacksaw.  I had to reheat the grips and they slid right back on and once they cooled they are tight as a drum. 

post #4 of 23

I've cut down a few glass and carbon poles over the years, and no issues so far.  Some poles are hollow in the middle but have a filler at the tip, possibly just to anchor screws for grips/straps, I don't know.

 

Though it results in a nice clean cut, I will caution against use of a power saw.  I used my chop/miter saw to cut down a pair once, and it made a itchy prickly mess as the fibers got spread around.  In fact, it bothered me every time I used the saw for a couple months after that.  Next time I would hook a shop vac to the saw outlet instead of using a collection bag.

 

I think a non-reciprocating, fine-tooth blade is the way to go.  Anything else would risk tearing fibers too much, maybe lead to splintering.  Wrapping with tape is a good idea too.

 

 

post #5 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadrash View Post

I just cut a pair the other day.  Soak the grip end in boiling water for a minute or so and they will slide right off.  Wrap the pole where you want to cut it with masking tape and saw with a fine toothed hacksaw.  I had to reheat the grips and they slid right back on and once they cooled they are tight as a drum. 


Ahh! thanks for the hint on the boiling water.  I gave up trying to get those things off.  I thought they might have been glued on in addition to having screws.

post #6 of 23

Cutting is done all the time with graphite golf shafts, and I have done those and carbon fiber lacrosse shafts as well. An alternative to the fine tooth hacksaw blade is a grit blade which is abrasive instead of cutting. As it's been said, wrapping with masking tape will help with any minor splintereing of the cut, usually at the final few strokes.

 

Check golf supply sites like golfworks to see if they have instructions.

post #7 of 23

Little trick from the mountain biking world for removing and remounting grips. Steal your wifes hair spray

 

Its a great lube and when it dries it sticks em hard, but removable as its its own solvent, so just lift a bit of grip and spray some it and rotate to remove

post #8 of 23

grit wheel works great.

 

We cut carbon and carbon/alu arrows (archery) all the time. I know they have to take more abuse than a ski pole as far as impact and flex.

 

Davluri, PM me if you need access to a high speed grit wheel/saw.

 

 

 

DC

post #9 of 23

Another way to remove the grip is to place the pole in a vice that isn't tight now grab the basket end of the pole and pull.  I have done this to replce grips and to cut down poles.

post #10 of 23

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

Is it safe to cut off the top of a composite pole? The plan is to cut (2" off) with a fine tooth saw, check that no cracks have been created, sand the end smooth, coat end with 2 part epoxy, let dry and put the grip back on. (My kid bought them on sale but too long as he now realizes.)

 

I ask because the standard ski shop response has to be: no. (liability?), but is there any real danger of the pole blowing under stress? (I'm not the litigious type )

 

Now that I was able finally able to get my grips off with boiling water, I cut my composite poles down this afternoon using a cutoff wheel on a Dremel and sanded them smooth.  I didn't see any need use an epoxy on the end, because it wasn't sealed to begin with.  Besides, The very end of the pole supports very little load anyway.

 

I also had to heat the grips back up to get them back on.  I ended up just pounding them against the floor to get them on completely. 

 

post #11 of 23

Absolutely, Ive cut 3 pair, using a hack saw it cuts like butter.

post #12 of 23

It would seem obvious, but be sure to use a respirator mask.  The body has difficulty removing carbon from the lungs.

post #13 of 23

Don't make things complicated when not needed :) No need for epoxy, and to be honest, no need for respirator masks either... unless you will start cutting few 100 poles a day ;) 

I agree that it's not healthy, but you really don't need to worry if you will cut one pair of poles every few years :)

As far as cutting goes, you need to be careful about one thing... some poles can be cut, some can't, and other can be cut just at specific side. I have been cutting whole bunch of poles during all this time, and with xc skiing poles (at least Exel and Swix) they can be cut only on grip side. With Exel alpine skiing poles, I have no idea where I would cut them at all. On top they are wider, but just for centimeter or two, and then they go to thin pole. On bottom, I have no idea how to get tip of the pole off. I guess it would go with hot water as it goes with xc skiing baskets or with grips, but I'm not really sure about this.

And one more thing... there exists really nice "glue" which you heat and put on pole and only then mount grip on. It will hold so good, you will never know you took grip off. Once you "cook" it in hot water (together with grip of course), it lets grip just slide off the pole again. But it would be too much to ask where to get it. I still have a bit of it left from my serviceman days, but I have no idea where to get it when it will run out.

post #14 of 23

People cut tapered poles on the basket end?


Edited by karpiel - 4/17/2009 at 08:42 pm GMT
post #15 of 23

I cut poles with a small pipe cutting tool.

Works great, no splinters or dust. Gives a clean smooth cut...

 

:D

 

 

post #16 of 23

"Soak the grip end in boiling water for a minute or so and they will slide right off"

 

How the heck do you do that? I can't imagine standing in the kitchen with a ski pole upside down with the grip in a pot of boiliing water.  Is there even enough room between the pot and the ceiling?

post #17 of 23

You're not actually cooking your pole for dinner.

 

Put pot on ground, or bring it outside.  put pole in pot.

 

Or if  you have a hot water kettle, then you can heat water the kettle, then you pour hot water onto your pole in a plastic bucket, flowerpot, or other random container that might not actually be stove safe.

post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by WVSkier View Post

"Soak the grip end in boiling water for a minute or so and they will slide right off"

How the heck do you do that? I can't imagine standing in the kitchen with a ski pole upside down with the grip in a pot of boiliing water.  Is there even enough room between the pot and the ceiling?

I've done it. Angles are your friend. smile.gif
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by WVSkier View Post
 

"Soak the grip end in boiling water for a minute or so and they will slide right off"

 

How the heck do you do that? I can't imagine standing in the kitchen with a ski pole upside down with the grip in a pot of boiliing water.  Is there even enough room between the pot and the ceiling?

 

Top of a standard free standing range is approx. 36" AFF. The standard ceiling height in most US residential homes is 96" (8'). That leaves about 60" clearance for the poles. Unless you poles are longer than 60" and or you have a extremely thick bottom pot. I think you should be OK. 

post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by WVSkier View Post
 

"Soak the grip end in boiling water for a minute or so and they will slide right off"

 

How the heck do you do that? I can't imagine standing in the kitchen with a ski pole upside down with the grip in a pot of boiliing water.  Is there even enough room between the pot and the ceiling?

 

You bumped a 6 year old thread.  Nice!

post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post

 

You bumped a 6 year old thread.  Nice!

 

Has he been boiling the poles for six years? :eek I guess it's way pass al dente. :D 

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by WVSkier View Post

 
"Soak the grip end in boiling water for a minute or so and they will slide right off"

How the heck do you do that? I can't imagine standing in the kitchen with a ski pole upside down with the grip in a pot of boiliing water.  Is there even enough room between the pot and the ceiling?

Top of a standard free standing range is approx. 36" AFF. The standard ceiling height in most US residential homes is 96" (8'). That leaves about 60" clearance for the poles. Unless you poles are longer than 60" and or you have a extremely thick bottom pot. I think you should be OK. 

Have only ever had occasion to do this with nordic poles. My skate poles are 160cm. And then there is the range hood issue. It can be done. But it is not an elegant operation. Be especially wary of any ceiling fixtures.
post #23 of 23

Or you can put the pot of hot water on a trivet/cutting board on the floor...elegance does matter, so be sure to have your lines memorised for stirring...

 

Thrice the brinded cat hath mew'd.
Thrice and once, the hedge-pig whin'd.
Harpier cries:—'tis time! 'tis time!


Round about the caldron go;
    In the poison'd entrails throw.—
    Toad, that under cold stone,
    Days and nights has thirty-one;
    Swelter'd venom sleeping got,
    Boil thou first i' the charmed pot!


        Double, double toil and trouble;
    Fire burn, and caldron bubble.


 Fillet of a fenny snake,
    In the caldron boil and bake;
    Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
    Wool of bat, and tongue of dog,
    Adder's fork, and blind-worm's sting,
    Lizard's leg, and owlet's wing,—
    For a charm of powerful trouble,
    Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.


        Double, double toil and trouble;
    Fire burn, and caldron bubble.


Scale of dragon; tooth of wolf;
    Witches' mummy; maw and gulf
    Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark;
    Root of hemlock digg'd i the dark;
    Liver of blaspheming Jew;
    Gall of goat, and slips of yew
    Sliver'd in the moon's eclipse;
    Nose of Turk, and Tartar's lips;
    Finger of birth-strangled babe
    Ditch-deliver'd by a drab,—
    Make the gruel thick and slab:
    Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
    For the ingrediants of our caldron.


Double, double toil and trouble;
    Fire burn, and caldron bubble.


  Cool it with a baboon's blood,
    Then the charm is firm and good.


Edited by cantunamunch - 3/17/15 at 9:41am
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Can you cut carbon-composite poles