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Retirement to ski country - who has done it and who wants to - Page 2

post #31 of 79
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMD View Post

delibrate1. I am living proof you do have to grow older but you never have to grow up. I retired last fall from UPS after 35 years. The pensoin income has enabled me to relocate to Summit County Colorado and enjoy my first year as a Ski Bum. I have already skied over 100 days this season at A-Basin, Breckenridge, Copper, Keystone, Vail and Beaver Creek. The move to Ski Country has been a long time dream finally brought to life.Highlights of the season and move to Summit County include the Masters Race Training at Copper Mountain and meeting and skiing with so many of the local Barking Bear Forum Members. Also the joy of meeting and skiing with many traveling Bears as they travel through. Includind Trekchicks three Wild West Tours. If you get the chance to retire and follow that dream, I highly recommend it. As Warren Miller stated "If you don't do it this year you will be one year older when you finally get to do it".James.


James, good for you. You have made the dream come true. And to be on the snow more than 100 days in a year  - well, that almost sounds like the best JOB in the world. Was wondering how you have found life off the slopes. When I think of places I may want to live, I tend to shy away from destination resorts as a retirement address. I spent some time at Vail and Park City this year. The skiing was epic, but I would not want to live in those places. Could be partly that I am just a country boy from Maine. Been around some, but have always lived in a "real" place. More I hear from others who have posted, more I see myself spending time in a place that was a town or city that grew up before skiing - like Bend, or Jackson Hole or Salt Lake City or other such places. I do not want to live in a one trick town. I do other stuff - professional jazz musician and pro photographer. I already live far enough away from places that can feed that need, that I would prefer to have that muse near by in my next life. And the grim part of me realizes that there may come a time when I can not ski. If that happens, I want to be in a place that still has meaning. A place where you can be part of a community, not just a skiing carpetbagger. My wife and I have always become involved in our local schools and places of worship. Not likely that we could give that up in our retirement. Would not want to. Thaks for sharing your experience.
 

David

post #32 of 79

"And the grim part of me realizes that there may come a time when I can not ski. If that happens, I want to be in a place that still has meaning."

 

Exactly!  It would be very frustrating to finally retire in ski country and then not be able to ski due to health.  What's fun now at 50 might not be so great at 65+.  Although most big resorts are OK in the medical dept., I probably can't afford to live there.  And the podunk ski areas with reasonable housing and land costs are often way out in the sticks far from decent health care facilities.  That said, I'll try to retire next to a ski area if I can (I'm eyeing Hoback or Bondurant, WY for now).  I'm used to driving 3-4 hours to ski now, less than an hour to Jackson Hole would be an indescribable luxury.

post #33 of 79

retire in ski country? ha

 

my goal is to be there for the rest of my life at all cost. you have to have something than have it taken away to truly realize how much it means to you.

post #34 of 79

Yeah, I've thought of this often the last two years as I have broken two wrists skiing and a knee cap just while feeding the dogs.  Fortunately, my ortho surgeon is fairly good (I guess, still recovering), but he's sort of become the "family doctor".  Most of the activities in this area do require mobility to enjoy -- skiing, hiking, golf, biking, etc.  There's not a lot of "laying around on the beach by a turquoise sea".  I guess we have "decent" health care, but a lot of people end up going to Seattle for things.  

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post

"And the grim part of me realizes that there may come a time when I can not ski. If that happens, I want to be in a place that still has meaning."

 

Exactly!  It would be very frustrating to finally retire in ski country and then not be able to ski due to health.  What's fun now at 50 might not be so great at 65+.  Although most big resorts are OK in the medical dept., I probably can't afford to live there.  And the podunk ski areas with reasonable housing and land costs are often way out in the sticks far from decent health care facilities.  That said, I'll try to retire next to a ski area if I can (I'm eyeing Hoback or Bondurant, WY for now).  I'm used to driving 3-4 hours to ski now, less than an hour to Jackson Hole would be an indescribable luxury.

 

post #35 of 79
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Yeah, I've thought of this often the last two years as I have broken two wrists skiing and a knee cap just while feeding the dogs.

Damn, awful sorry to hear that.

Last year, a woman impressed with my technique pulled up behind me on an ice covered slope and took me out. Lost consiousness twice on the ride (doc said helmet saved my life). And thought I had ripped my medial meniscus. Was really lucky. No lasting consequences from the closed head injury, except the next one wil be worse, given the cumulative nature of them. And the knee injury was just a strain that resolved in a month. Someone like that can ruin your retirement plans. And that is why as important as skiing is, there has to be something more to any place one chooses to live.

post #36 of 79

d1, you make several good points that hit close to home for me.

I'm 61, bought the first vacation place ever owned by anyone in my or my wife's family last year. Hope to make it at least a part time residence when we retire in 2 years. It's ski in - ski out!

Religion and the family of believers has been important in our life. We're not church leaders, or even folks with a strong faith, but most of our friends come from a church going background from numerous different churches. My wife's a semipro singer and has been a soloist in a church choir her whole life. Religion does not seem to prosper in most resort town and I 'm concerned that we will miss the connections and friendships we've always shared with our church going friends. We can see the possibility of living near the ski area and driving an hour to church two or three times a week and making a whole different group of new friends there in addition to the new friends we will make near the resort.

Another source of social activity is the country club. Golf for me and USTA tennis for her are regular weekly events and the people we meet there quickly become social friends too. Clubs in ski towns are outlandishly expensive. Membership must be made up of the uber-rich. I'm not sure I fit into that go-go lifestyle. Short of club membership I've found that the only other mountain area golf and tennis facilities are primarily for the vacationers. At almost every club in our town there is a one o'clock game where you know you can show up and get a $5 - $10 Nassau game. I've checked at several ski town public courses and there is nothing like that. You either make arrangements to play with someone you know or you play by yourself.

Health becomes more of an issue as you age. I know folks ski into their 70's and 80's but realistically how many can keep a good back, two good hips and two good knees thru their 70's? That plus the occasional ski injury and you miss half a season here and a whole season there and it's a little harder each time to get back on the slopes. I also love to golf. Two ski related shoulder injuries healed quickly when I was younger. The same two injuries today would probably cost me half the summer in rehab. Not something I want to face but it is an unavoidable risk.We also think there is a wide gap in quality of medical service between a medical center/teaching hospital and the small to mid sized towns that serve the ski areas. Can geriatric medical care be really good in a town full of ski bums? Is that where a specialist would chose to practice? Probably not.

What to do when you can no longer ski much? So you pick up from where you've lived all your life and move to the mountains and make new friends. Then after a few years you may not be able to ski as much as you once did but you're in a "ski town". What else is there to do? If everything revolves around the mountain how do you fill your time? I've known folks who retired and moved away only to come back to their home town and old friends in a few years. Sometimes they have a hard time trying to pick up where they left off. "You can never go home again" are among the truest words ever spoken.

Last but not least there are those you leave behind that you are at least partly responsible for. My mother is 94. She has full time care but she still needs help, visits, decision making and comfort from her two sons. You can't do that from 1,000 miles away.

I know to a younger reader these all sound like the whining of an old man and to some extent they are right, but in a larger sense it's partly the realization that life is not perfect. Some of your goals you never reach. Some of the choices you make for family and security prevent you from doing some of the other things you may have wanted to do. When there are several people involved it's a balancing act.

post #37 of 79
Thread Starter 

Steve, appreciate your thoughts and sentiments. Had to chuckle though after reading your impression that "religion does not seem to prosper in most resort towns". Funny, but when I was at Deer Valley on a Friday last month, there was a sign at a lift for a Jewsih Sabbath service in the Sunshine (?) cabin off that trail, at 3:00. Being of that persuasion, me and my buddy went to check it out. Had a great Shabbat service with about 30 others, all standing around in our gear. The rabbi had the pulpit in the Park City synagague, a brand new building that is drop dead gorgeous, and reflects not only the patronage of some very "supportive" members but the financial backing of the Zion Bank, which is run, you guessed it, by the Mormon Church, if my info is correct. Not sure about other places, but there was more of the Almighty, than snow, in Park City when I was there.

Age certainly is a consideration. Not sure about you, but I am an 18 year old perpetually stuck in a body that is growing older every year. I do have the genes on my side, though. My uncle, who had a hip replacement two years ago, just got back from Aspen. He is 86. And he told me that he "caught some air" out there - unintentionally. I fgure that I have at least 35 more good years on the slopes - and then will figure out what to do then.

Appreciate your committment to you family. That is a hard one. You nailed it. A "balancing act" for certain. Ultimately, the decision you make, whatever it is, will be the right one.

Warm regards,

David

 

post #38 of 79

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

  I guess we have "decent" health care, but a lot of people end up going to Seattle for things.  

 


Last year I went down from Fernie to Kalispell for a fancy root canal.  The guy was really good, better than what we could find in Denver.
 

post #39 of 79

 

Quote:
. Can geriatric medical care be really good in a town full of ski bums? Is that where a specialist would chose to practice? Probably not.


We have some specialists in Bend who are here because they like the place.  We have several US Ski team pool docs.
 

I knew a French woman in Indonesia who came all the way  to Bend for special endometriosis treatment.  The doctor has been written up as an example of what can't be accomplished in the bureaucracy of a big university hospital.

 

Bend takes care of all the rural towns east of here, and has a slew of aging retirees, so there is more health care here than most towns this size..  It is rare for someone to have to go to Portland.  It was definitely a factor in leaving Fernie, where the local emergency care is not so great.

post #40 of 79

I've a friend at work who's uncle retired  coupleo of years ago.  He sold his home in New England and bought 2 condos ... one in J-ville, Fla and the other in Asheville, NC.  Now, it's not exactly ski country in Asheville, but the idea about selling the home to get 2 condos appealed to me.  So this is the angle I plan to work on ... a condo for a ski place when it's cold and a condo at a warm, green place when it's warm. 

 

Personally, I've been to Whitefish, Mt a few times, and the locals tell me the better time to be there is in the summertime ... perhaps this ought to be my pick of the places to "retire" to.

post #41 of 79

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post

"And the grim part of me realizes that there may come a time when I can not ski. If that happens, I want to be in a place that still has meaning."

 

Exactly!  It would be very frustrating to finally retire in ski country and then not be able to ski due to health.  What's fun now at 50 might not be so great at 65+.  Although most big resorts are OK in the medical dept., I probably can't afford to live there.  And the podunk ski areas with reasonable housing and land costs are often way out in the sticks far from decent health care facilities.  That said, I'll try to retire next to a ski area if I can (I'm eyeing Hoback or Bondurant, WY for now).  I'm used to driving 3-4 hours to ski now, less than an hour to Jackson Hole would be an indescribable luxury.



 

Besides Jackson Hole, there is Targhee.  But, most importantly, WY has no state income tax!!!

post #42 of 79

 Quote:

Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

 


Option 3 has many possibilities.  Why Switzerland?  I'd go for France or Austria.  Bulgaria and Slovenia have potential for those on a budget.  I've spent many fun years just working it all out.

 

Skiing, biking, cooking the perfect wild boar.......


 

"Option 3: Switzerland: Live in/close to a world class city(Zurich, Geneva), Excellent sking and you take the train to the to the slopes."

 

Let's see, "world class" cities. Paris would more than qualify. If it weren't that far from the mountains, that is. Milan is close to the mountain and (from what I heard) equally close to being qualify "world class". But it's not in France nor Austria. Just kidding...

 

Nothing wrong with Austria or France, or Italy for that matter. But it's clear Zurich and Geneva both have "reputation" as the most livable city. And anyone who had visited for a short few days would find them extremely attractive. They just "happen" to be in Switzerland, which has nothing to do with them being so "livable". For those of us not living in Europe, which other cities in Austria and France would you suggest that compare favorably with Zurich and Geneva?

post #43 of 79

It depends on what you like.  If you like hiking, golf, fishing, etc. summer is great.  BUT, there are MORE TOURISTS during summer.  Having worked (until the broken knee cap) in a store downtown, the tourist thing really started getting to me after several summers of it.  Whitefish Lake gets pretty nuts with speedboats and skidoos or whatever those things are.   The town is more cozy and friendly in the spring and fall when the tourists are gone.  You run into everyone you know, so you either always look nice or decide everyone is going to see what you really look like at some point and you just roll out of bed and put on some shoes and jeans...  The first year I was here I wore some slacks once.  Now they're gathering dust along with the suits and dresses....

 

In summer, the humidity is nice and low and each night the temps go down into the 50's, so you can open all the windows and cool the house off against those nasty 80's the next day.  Of course, occasionally forest fires are a big issue, but not so bad in Whitefish area since 2003. 

 

I do think that as small towns go, ski areas are MORE LIKELY to have good physical therapists and orthopedic surgeons than other areas their size, as the business is there.  And face it, you could be just out of med school and deciding whether to go to a metro area or some paradise like Whitefish.  Some, the very ambitious kind, will head to a big metro area, but others who value their personal lives will decide that you give up a lot pursuing your career in an urban area. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorm57 View Post

 

 

Personally, I've been to Whitefish, Mt a few times, and the locals tell me the better time to be there is in the summertime ... perhaps this ought to be my pick of the places to "retire" to.

 

post #44 of 79
Quote:

For those of us not living in Europe, which other cities in Austria and France would you suggest that compare favorably with Zurich and Geneva?

 

I'd look at Grenoble for sure. Maybe Saltzburg.  Pau is great . Nice (the city of Nice) if skiing isn't #1. Lausanne over Geneva.  Good question.  How big of a city do you need?

post #45 of 79

Okay.   If I couldn't live in Zermatt, I'd settle for Davos....

 

Nothing against France or Austria, I just prefer Switzerland.  Unless my retirement funds start showing some life, I'll never retire.

post #46 of 79
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patmoore View Post

 

Nothing against France or Austria, I just prefer Switzerland.  Unless my retirement funds start showing some life, I'll never retire.


Or in the words of my uncle who just turned 91, "I have outlived my money." Now there is a mixed blessing.
 

post #47 of 79

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patmoore View Post

Okay.   If I couldn't live in Zermatt, I'd settle for Davos....

 

Nothing against France or Austria, I just prefer Switzerland.  Unless my retirement funds start showing some life, I'll never retire.

I lived in Leysin Switzerland for a year, so I'm not unfamiliar with the place,  Nice, but certainly the country where you would got through your funds the fastest.

 

post #48 of 79

Interesting thread.  In the past few years my wife and I have used one day on each of our ski trips to look at potential second homes.  Our thought was to eventually sell our home here in Jacksonville, which is too large for two, buy a condo at the beach and a condo in the mountains, with the idea of spending half the year at each.  I'm 49, my wife is 47, and we have three daughters:  one in college, one getting ready to start college, and one starting high school.  So, obviously, we we're looking a few years into the future.  At one time I had a robust  401K, a sizable brokerage account, and a house that was worth a lot.  Now I have a 401K (no longer robust), a brokerage account (no longer sizable), and a large house (which at least I will own outright in two years) that's worth a lot less than a few years ago.  So our plan is on hold for a few years.  However, after hours of discussion we did come up with some thoughts on what our future second home must have.

 

1.)  Access.  If you live there part-time, and you're travel ling back and forth, it's nice to have a decent airport nearby.  If you move there full-time it's easier for children and grandchildren to visit you, and you to visit them, if a trip to the airport isn't two or three hours.

 

2.)  Health care.  The older you get the more likely you'll need this, so access to health care is essential.  For me this might also be a source of part-time employment.  For those considering retirement in a foreign country this a particularly important issue.  After paying into medicare for all these years are you ready to walk away from it?  Of course this may end up being a moot point as the entitlement programs become less tenable.

 

3.)  Religion.  We're not particularly religious but it's always nice to have a house of worship of your particular religion or denomination.

 

4.)  Non-ski activities.  100 ski days sounds great now, but may not be possible as you get older.  We felt there must be other activities available.  Most ski towns have plenty of off-mountain activities in the summer, but what about the winter?

 

5.)  Culture.  In some of the towns we visited there are museums and theater, supplemented by various festivals.  In others entertainment was very limited.

 

6.)  Restaurants.  Again, not an issue in some towns, major issue in others.  After all, who wants to eat at home all the time?

 

7.)  Community.  This is the most difficult to gauge, and probably the most important.  Most ski towns have two economic/social classes - the ultra-wealthy and those who serve them (and the visitors) in exchange for living there.  Since we fall into neither category it might be difficult to find "community".

 

Given the current state of affairs, our plan is temporarily on hold.  However, if we were going to "pull the trigger" today we would probably lean towards Park City, Utah.  It's not our most favorite town, nor our favorite ski area.  It does score highly in all the other characteristics we consider important.  It's easy to get to, has a diverse community, has a reasonable amount of culture, nice restaurants, and is close enough to Salt Lake City to access it's health care.  Everybody's needs are, of course, different. 

 

 

post #49 of 79
Quote:

 a large house (which at least I will own outright in two years) that's worth a lot less than a few years ago.

You do realize the two condo's you're thinking of also cost a lot less than a few years ago?

post #50 of 79

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post

"And the grim part of me realizes that there may come a time when I can not ski. If that happens, I want to be in a place that still has meaning."

 

Exactly!  It would be very frustrating to finally retire in ski country and then not be able to ski due to health.  What's fun now at 50 might not be so great at 65+. 


Yep. By the time your 65 it's all over. Might as well just hang it up
 

 

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/83620/to-those-who-are-afraid-they-won-t-be-able-to-ski-after-they-retire#post_1092567

 

 

post #51 of 79

This is a great thread. It's interesting to see how others chase our common passion. Bushwhacker, your a kid. You're just starting out. May as well do it here. Get back here.

 I've always had a job that guaranteed a lot of freedom and decent, if not spectacular, money. First fax machines were invented, then the internet and 15 years ago I was able to leave Manhattan and move anywhere- but once there, I had to set up a stable shop and be reachable anytime by the clients back in NY and elsewhere. That meant living close to my passion because it was cheaper than visiting and I would be close to my desk. So, Park City it was. I met my wife and we bought a house in SLC for eight years as she had to be closer to work. She was a full time, trauma 1, whole nine yards M.D. then, now works part time, outpatient. We started a family, then came back to Park City a few years ago before housing here tripled. (SLC didn't suck though, with season passes to Alta every year) Real estate's taken a hit since, but it doesn't matter to me. Got a low 30 year fixed and I intend to pay it off and be carried out on a gurney.

 I can see PCMR  and DV from my bedroom and the Canyons from the office. The only thing better here than ski season is summer, which is unbelievable.

 We've had some serious setbacks, health and fortune, but we love it here, the place and the people. I try to get up on the mountain at least three days a week, or part therof, in season, and hit nearly every powder day. I work around the powder and work pretty hard all summer.

 I have a ski buddy, Emily, who owns Em's restaurant in SLC. She came out from Chicago as a ski bum 20 years ago, worked as a nurse, then started her restaurant based on her talent and love of cooking. She was my Alta buddy for years and then dropped of the earth as her restaurant took all her time. (my wife's a good skier, but Em charges...) Now it's a success and running smoothly, so she has her Alta pass again and we're back in business. On one great powder day this winter at Alta, as we were hiking up Rustler Ridge once again after all these years- we made a deal. We would ski every powder day we possibly could for the next 15 years- by then I'll be 70 -and then we'll reassess for the next ten...

post #52 of 79

 

Some random thoughts about the whole Retiring to Paradise plan:

 

  1. You really have to travel around and see a lot of different places before deciding where the best place for you is.  Some of the best towns aren't necessarily the ones that appear in the top 10 lists published by Outside magazine.  Sure, anyone can point to Bend, Steamboat, and the Frasier Valley.  Some of you might be perfectly happy in Kellogg, Idaho and it's probably not on your radar. 
  2. When you decide to move, realize you're the new folks in town.  Whatever you do, don't try to make your new home like the one you left.  Don't join the town council, don't fight for new ordinances to ban the things you're not comfortable with.  Sit back and enjoy the chaos of your atmosphere.  Too many good mountain towns have been wrecked by folks trying to enjoy their retirement.
  3. I really love that Warren Miller quote along the lines of, "If you don't do it this year, you'll just be another year older when you do."  It's like having kids - there's never a good time to do it.  The hard part is making the decision to change your lifestyle, so just get over the decision making part and do it.
  4. If you're worried about fitting in, you probably don't.  On the other hand, if you travel to somewhere like Telluride and your first thought is, "I wish I could be around people like this all the time.", then you're probably on the right track.
  5. Giving up the rat race to work in a rental shop is very cathartic.

 

post #53 of 79

Great thread!

Reminded me what an old friend who moved a lot with his job once told me. He said, "It's easy to make new friends, you just have to meet them half way - then decide it they're worth the effort and go the other half of the way."  In other words, remember you're the outsider and the locals already have their own life.

 

post #54 of 79

 

With regard to skiing (and other outdoor activities) as age increases.

You may not move quite as fast as the years pile up and you certainly don't recover as quickly, but there's plenty of fun to be had.  What's incredibly cool about retiring/living in a ski resort town is that the outdoor lifestyle quickly becomes the norm.  Hiking, climbing, biking, skiing, water sports, etc just become part of what you do practically every day. 
 
This time of year, we often do "two or three-sport days".  You start with a hike up Teton Pass to get some corn skiing.  At noon, you get on the bike for a 20 or 30-mile ride.  Later in the afternoon, you go fishing (in my case, today), climbing, golfing, or whatever.   The result is a whole community full of people who are incredibly fit given their advanced age.

Here are some photos of AARP members having a good time. No names given to protect the old farts, just ages.  All of these photos are taken in places not served by lifts, by the way. Hiking at some altitude is mandatory.  Also, the pictures are mostly five or six years old and none of the people in these photos seem to have slowed down at all.
 


Big Cottonwood Canyon above Lake Blanche, springtime, approximate age 54:




Maverick, Grand Teton National Park, wintertime, approximate age 65:



Granite Canyon, Jackson Hole Mountain Resort Backcountry, female, approximate age 57:



Same skier, climbing in Little Cottonwood Canyon, approximate age 55:




Great White Hump, north of Glory Peak, Teton Pass, springtime, approximate age 67:

 
71 year old male skiing in the Absaroka Range north of Jackson Hole:
 
 
72 year old female on Mount Hunt in Grand Teton National Park:
 

 
 
I could go on. 

post #55 of 79

Pretty sweet and inspiring pix!

 

Right now just getting our youngest out of high school is the goal - it means no longer being locked into the drive from San Francisco to Squaw on Friday and Sunday nights!

 

Retirement is still a dream....

 

Jen 

post #56 of 79

Fantastic!

post #57 of 79

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SNPete View Post

 


Yep. By the time your 65 it's all over. Might as well just hang it up
 

 

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/83620/to-those-who-are-afraid-they-won-t-be-able-to-ski-after-they-retire#post_1092567

 

 



 

Oh, I have every intention of skiing until I die.  Grandma lived to age 100, dad still going strong scuba diving all over the world at 78.  Unfortunately the trend on my mom's side is to just live long enough to reproduce.

post #58 of 79

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skicougar View Post

 


I wouldn't give up a day of the mountain for a football, basketball, hockey or any other game; but a day at a baseball game is almost a tie.(I cant say for sure given you cant ski most places during baseball season). Watching a game on tv just inst the same.
 

 


Definitely depends on the sport....Football at the game or on TV is a tossup, between buying beer and waiting for a BR, nevermind parking...

Baseball-I cannot watch in on TV....

Hockey is much better live-the camera rarely keeps up with the puck

post #59 of 79

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pcskier View Post

 

 

Where in Grand County?  It's a nice place to be.  Too bad the beetles are eating all the pines.

 


Grand Lake...the tree situation is a combination of no fire allowed, old trees and relatively warm winters....

We went to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon (named from the little river that comes out of Grand Co, BTW) and saw the forest service was replanting ponderosa pine where the lodgepole pine had burned 5-6 years ago with the big forest fire there. Ponderosa pine is beetle resistant....maybe the forest service would consider the same for Grand Lake/Granby area-it's in the Arapaho National Forest....

I can definitely put some time replanting trees for them when I move....

My kids are wanting to move before they're 18, plus Sam has moved up the time he sees himself being done with the company he's working for....

Maybe, we'll be moving sooner...

As for "fitting in" with the locals.....my feeling is, if you're there long enough, they won't remember to care...

post #60 of 79

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ldrjax View Post

 At one time I had a robust  401K, a sizable brokerage account, and a house that was worth a lot.  Now I have a 401K (no longer robust), a brokerage account (no longer sizable), and a large house (which at least I will own outright in two years) that's worth a lot less than a few years ago.  So our plan is on hold for a few years.  However, after hours of discussion we did come up with some thoughts on what our future second home must have.

 

 

2.)  Health care.  The older you get the more likely you'll need this, so access to health care is essential.  For me this might also be a source of part-time employment.  For those considering retirement in a foreign country this a particularly important issue.  After paying into medicare for all these years are you ready to walk away from it?  Of course this may end up being a moot point as the entitlement programs become less tenable.

 

 

 


Unfortunately, you are not well informed when it comes to health care financing. Medicare is here to stay-our hospitals depend too much on Medicare Part A financing to function. Whether or not Medicare exists as it is now is the question. Medicare will most likely be redone as a fully functional plan rather than the catastrophic-coverage-originally-and-now-a-patchwork-mismosh-of-regulations as it is now.

As for paying into Medicare, your are paying for beneficiaries now. People never pay as much into the system as the system pays out in claims-even the people who contribute the maximum amount, like me.

The imbalance of payers into the system and beneficiaries is one of the reasons our government has never cracked down on illegal immigration-it needs those people's tax dollars too much!

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