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What off season sport keeps you in tune for skiing? - Page 2

post #31 of 66

I plan to do alot of hiking and biking in the spring/summer.  One of the great things about skiing is being out on the mountain - the same applies to hiking and mountain biking.  Great exercise and you get to enjoy being outside - can be especially challenging to hike up some steep trails.  I am looking forward to the spring/summer activities - just greart to enjoy all of the seasons outdoors.

 

Cheers

post #32 of 66

Well, there's the hiking, running, the rock climbing, the weight room, and then there are the biggies...lots of road biking, lots of mountain biking, oh yeah lots of BC skiing too!

post #33 of 66

I'd divide the activities in two separate categories, the one to stay fit and connected and the ones to "just" stay fit

In the first

Inline skating and if possible, on flattish closed roads downhill skating (with poles for closer feelings)

MTB

Some hiking

 

In the second

Swimming

Rope Jumping

Spinning

Tennis, I'd love to play it again...

 

These are my good intentions, and I know too well that the road to hell is fully paved of 'em.

 What I think it'll happen is that I'll lie down in the sun for most of the summer (except when by the seaside, then I'll do a lot of swimming / snorkeling)  and then will frantically look for some way to get fit

(ski gym? Taiji?) and in shape. By then it will be too late and, once again I will have to start from scratch...Tee Hee

 

post #34 of 66

I mountain bike alot 5-6 days a week usually. closest feeling I have found to skiing in the summer time, kinda of more like ski touring but still very similar to downhill skiing. I never really quit mountain biking this year I got a 3-4 times each month though out the winter. Riding in the snow is actually tons of fun.

 

I mountain bike because its fun and after being spoiled by western Pa singletrack I will freely admit to avoiding doubletrack and other such nonsense just because to me its REALLY boring.

 

with that said I also ride in the morning from my house on a very old trek road bike. Makes me a much faster mountain biker. Its feel like climbs come on you faster and are much harder on a road bike. So when I get back on the Mountain bikes it just seems easier.

 

FYI if any of you guys end up in western pa and want to see some sweet trail, Id be glad to show you around.

 

 

post #35 of 66

We do a lot of hiking and jet skiing.  Not much to keep my ski legs other than jumping HUGE waves on Lake Superior!  :)

post #36 of 66

The common theme here is that a lot of folks are poitning out that most of this is second fiddle to skiing bigtime.  What dawned on me recently is that I ski terrain and pitch that I wouldn't dream of attempting on a bike and espeically not on a skateboard  That's why skiing is soo much cooler than everything else IMO.  I wonder why I never thought about it like that before??

post #37 of 66

Way back when they were somewhat popular I thought about buying some Rollka grass skis although taking a tumble with those on looks pretty unforgiving.

 

Hiking and mountain biking are what I do in the summer but they pale in comparison to skiing (for me) -- although I guess it depends where you do it. Last summer we took a family vacation to the Alps. Around Chamonix we had the most fun we have ever had hiking. Half way down the mountain from the Aguille du Midi we were fortunate enough to view a fairly large scale avalanche (bottom photo) -- pretty awesome and loud!!

 

 

 

 


Edited by MidwestPete - 4/13/2009 at 03:32 pm GMT
post #38 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

The common theme here is that a lot of folks are poitning out that most of this is second fiddle to skiing bigtime.  What dawned on me recently is that I ski terrain and pitch that I wouldn't dream of attempting on a bike and espeically not on a skateboard  That's why skiing is soo much cooler than everything else IMO.  I wonder why I never thought about it like that before??

 

 

for me mountain biking east coast single track on a sunny day is more fun than the average day skiing.

 

With mountain biking its trail choice and not trail condition in what makes it a good day. Everyday can be a 'powder day".

 

Now a skiing powder day is second only to driving a shifter kart IMO. The skiing powder day is closer to a natural feeling, while the shifter kart is just fing insane.

 

post #39 of 66

Whenever I get the chance I like to try summer skiing (which isn't too often!). This past summer I took the train (mostly through a tunnel) to the top of the Jungfrau in Switzerland. They have a very small area roped off on the glacier with a handle tow. It's about the size and pitch of my backyard. They could have skiing for miles but I think it is too dangerous with all of the crevasses. I took the below photos when the clouds lifted just a bit, but most of the time I could only see about 5 feet in front of me with all of the clouds/fog/snow. It wasn't really all that fun with the poor visibility but at least I got some more skiing in, plus I was the only one out there except for the guy running the rental shop!

 

About 10 years ago in July my wife and I skied the Stubai Glacier outside of Innsbruck -- same cloudy/foggy conditions but at least the trail was pretty long.

 

 

 

 

post #40 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 


Ugh! I'd rather watch someone else do that on TV!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

UGASkiDawg have you ever done the ride from Rollinsville up Rollins Pass, around the Needles Eye and down into Winter Park? A great ride for sure. Or how about Guanella Pass from Georgetown to Grant?

Boereas Pass from Como to Breck? I just LOVE these rides...

 

 I've done both Guanella and Boreas but it depends on what condition the dirt sections are in as to how much fun I have.  Last I rode both of these roads there were still dirts sections that can be hairy on 23's

 

I'll have to check out the Rollins Pass ride...you aren't the 1st person to tell me to hit it up.

post #41 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

 

 

 

for me mountain biking east coast single track on a sunny day is more fun than the average day skiing.

 

With mountain biking its trail choice and not trail condition in what makes it a good day. Everyday can be a 'powder day".

 

Now a skiing powder day is second only to driving a shifter kart IMO. The skiing powder day is closer to a natural feeling, while the shifter kart is just fing insane.
 


Hmmmm...I used whitewater kayaking for a number of years. The rush is intense, but the stakes are high, too. The incidence of injuries and fatalities is high for a sport with relatively few participants. It has the "natural" feeling of powder skiing. A whitewater boat is half submarine, and face shots are common. The required commitment when you drop into a class IV or V is considerable, since you can't stop just anywhere, and it can take considerable skill to make use of the available stopping points, if any. As a rather mediocre kayaker, I rarely did class V. Fortunately, I never swam in a class V! Or in any of the class IV runs I was fond of, either.

 

If you think beginning skiers are nervous, consider whitewater kayaking! In skiing, you fall down, stop, get up, collect your gear, etc., taking as long as you want. When you flip in a rapid, you have a major problem, because you can't breath and you can't stop. If you attempt to solve the breathing problem by getting out of the boat, your problems have just begun, because you're still not going to stop, and now your boat weighs 600 lbs, and you have to get it to shore somehow.

 

I got to the point where I didn't swim very often (very good roll), but it was always sobering when I did. I never made the jump to modern flat-bottomed hard chine playboats. I still own a Dagger RPM.

 

Don't do whitewater much any more. I've taken up sea kayaking on southern British Columbia's big interior lakes. That has a very "natural" feel, too, but no rush. And I can still roll the sea kayak.

 

I use in-line skates on occasion, but in-line skating in most of Nelson is insane because the town is glued to a rather steep hillside. Skateboards are popular around here, since you can get off before you kill yourself. I've never seen a pair of in-line skates in Nelson, besides mine.
 

DH mountain biking is popular around here, too, but I've already broken enough bones, thank you. I do single-track, two-track, rails-to-trails, etc. on my 20-year-old Fisher.

 

The hiking here is world-class. Period. What can I say? It's British Columbia.


INEPTITUDE - If you can't learn to do something well, learn to enjoy doing it poorly. (With credit to Ashleigh Brilliant)

post #42 of 66

TONS of mountain biking and soccer.

 

But these aren't even "off-season" sports for me anymore....I do 'em year round.

post #43 of 66

My summer activities include.....fishing, camping, kayaking, and hiking when I can....but for the most part it involves the work season for me. I am still in school....so landscaping in the summer keeps my butt in shape. Then of course the typical 12 oz curls. Other than that I try to get out and go for a run several times a week to keep up with the cardio.

post #44 of 66

Uncle Louie builds houses and I help.  Nothing like ladder work to build core, leg strength and balance.

post #45 of 66

Crgildart, I may be in agreement with you. Even though I have many, many, many improvements to make in my skiing, with the skills I do have I can tackle much more intense terrain and at much higher speeds than any other activity I perform! 

 

So all the below spring and summer activites I do with great joy, but in the back of my mind I'm always imagining what aspect of my skiing technique I'm going to fix next just as soon as that snow starts falling!

 

• Road biking: 13 mile sprints to work in SoHo from the northernmost tip of Manhattan, 1-3 times a week. If I get out before dark I'll do the return trip as well, though it's mostly uphill! This May for my birthday, a buddy and I are doing a few half-centuries to Beacon, NY, to visit the amazing museum there, and then we're doing a full century to visit my parents in Philly.

 

• Mountain biking and roller blading: I'm going to try out the mountain bike trails in Northern Manhattan, and do some more blading with the SO. Maybe I should get her a skateboard to practice her snowboarding! 

 

• Rock climbing. It's a much, much slower-paced sport than the ones above, but in the six months that I've taken it up with any frequency, I've been amazed at the results I've been feeling physically, and the mental challenges solving all the "problems" is an added bonus.

 

• Lots of body-weight conditioning. With any luck I'll be able to find a gymnastics or tumbling course, but in the meantime I've been doing body-weight exercises and plyometric exercises at home. Free-running and parkour may make their way into my routine as well–I've been watching tons of videos online in an effort to begin learning.

post #46 of 66

My main form of exercise is walking the dog twice a day.  As the new ski season approaches I make sure to pick up my pace and wear heavier boots.  My other main off-season activity is mountain biking.  As the summer progresses I try to ride at higher elevations to get used to physical activities at the elevations I ski at.  Unfortunately, mountain biking always ends a month or two berfore skiing starts so I lose some of the stamina I had gained.

post #47 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarCube View Post

Uncle Louie builds houses and I help.  Nothing like ladder work to build core, leg strength and balance.


Just where does one find "The Mecca of Midwest Skiing? I am due for a pilgrimage...  
 

post #48 of 66

I find cycling to be a great fitness builder. Like BWinPA I find cycling as rewarding and involving as skiing, and far more accessible. I am spending 10 hours a week cycling. I can ride where and when I want. Before work, after work, on weekends. No limits.

 

 

I also enjoy Rollerblades. The flat MUP's in Chicago are perfect for Rollerblades and the activity focuses on the same muscles as skiing, as far as I can tell.

 

I'll hike when I can, usually when finding some free time on business trips.

 

Above lake Louise;

 

 

Banff;

 

 

 

 

Cheers,

 

Michael


Edited by WILDCAT - 4/13/2009 at 09:27 pm GMT


Edited by WILDCAT - 4/13/2009 at 09:28 pm GMT
post #49 of 66

Is this the road to Ovrannaz from the HW9?

 

I try to cycle 100+mi per week, some weeks it is 10mi and some 400mi, which added up to 5,200mi /apprx 580,000ft of climbing last year. Living out West rocks.

post #50 of 66

My main non-winter activities or all year activities include:

 

Climbing (Sport or Trad)  <-- Absolutely phenomenal for stamina and a hell of a lot of fun.

Kayaking (White water and ocean) <-- Super fun and awesome for long trips.

Mountain Biking <-- Probably the best in terms of "staying in skiing shape"

Running <-- Just good for getting in some cardio (and setting higher and higher goals)

Swimming <-- Work as an instructor in the evening and it is a great low intensity exercise for some down time.

Hiking <-- Great for stamina

Mountaineering  <-- Great for the reward.

Scuba Diving <-- Great for the reward

Water Skiing <-- really.. nothing like downhill skiing, but a lot of fun.

 

It helps that I live where some of the best terrain for all of these sports is a short drive away.

 

I, personally, don't really think of it as "non-skiing" season, though. Really, it's just another kind of weather for new and different activities. I'll admit that sometimes my mind goes: Skiing Season, Climbing and Kayaking Season, Skiing Season, Climbing and Kayaking Season, and I'll neglect the others :P.

 

 

post #51 of 66

Biking (Roadie and Mtn.)

Running

Squash

Mountaineering/Climbing

post #52 of 66

I let my dog walk me, and I have to replace  the roof on the house this year. that ladder work should really help!!

post #53 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post

 


You got me there. Yes, I think skiing on groomers are boring! :o)
 

 

I already know one of the reason what I'm "doing it wrong": I'm skiing it too slowly. :-( 

 

But with the "usual" crowd of most eastern slopes, I just don't feel comfortable skiing at 2x the speed of the average slope user!

 

Even out west, when the slopes are much quieter, I've had one or two "near misses" while cruising at high(er) speed. I road bike a lot and had only crashed once in the past 10 years. But that one crash at 20+ mph was really nasty. Skiing on groomer, even the "average" speed is 20+! It only take one collision to really, really ruin my season, or life for that matter.

 

Now, how to have "fun" skiing groomers at sub-20 mph or when on a relatively crowded slope, I'm all ears (ok, eyes). ;-)

Well, how fast do you like to ski? Somehow I doubt you're a speed demon or you'd like groomers, and you're not skiing Alaska at 50mph (I think).

 

Usually, if you wait a few seconds you'll get you're own space.

Hell, when groups ski together they tend to all go at the same time and then run into each other. I don't want to mention names here....but had it happen this year on a trail that was like 75 yards wide.

 

In terms of groomers, I've actually experienced more close calls out west - odd I know.

I don't know many skiing on foot long planks anymore - that is boring indeed.  Too much work actually.

post #54 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WILDCAT View Post

Snip

 


 

I also enjoy Rollerblades. The flat MUP's in Chicago are perfect for Rollerblades and the activity focuses on the same muscles as skiing, as far as I can tell.

 

 

 



 

 

 

Cheers,

 

Michael

 

/Snip

 

 

    Michael, I tend to agree with you but only if you approach skating from the skier's perspective.

I was sustaining this point of view with my GF, until she started skiing, and tried to apply her skating knowledge (an ex racer...)to skiing. She found out that, for once, weight distribution in a turn is totally inverted (turning at high speed on a skate, the skater puts all his/her weight on the inside skate, not on the outside, it would mean a sure fall)...Of course, for us skiers, it easier to transfer and apply skiing tech, especially if we "just" skate for "fun&fitness"...

 

post #55 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobody View Post

 

 ...turning at high speed on a skate, the skater puts all his/her weight on the inside skate, not on the outside, it would mean a sure fall 

Huh?

 

I've been on hockey skates since I could walk. I've never gotten into trouble for riding the inside (big toe) edge of the outside blade.

 

When powering through a turn with crossovers, weight alternates between the inside and outside skates.

 

When coasting, as in skiing, I don't see any problem with weighting the outside skate, and I do it routinely on inline skates as well.

 

I must be doing something wrong.


My presence here suggests that a village somewhere is missing its idiot.

 

post #56 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post

 

 ...I've been on hockey skates since I could walk. I've never gotten into trouble for riding the inside (big toe) edge of the outside blade.

 

When powering through a turn with crossovers, weight alternates between the inside and outside skates.

 

When coasting, as in skiing, I don't see any problem with weighting the outside skate, and I do it routinely on inline skates as well. 


This is how I rollerblade. I keep my weight on the striding leg, the leg that's generating speed. I allow the skate to complete the stroke. This tends to bring the weighted foot back under me. It feels just like a ski completing a carved turn.

 

Michael

post #57 of 66

This is my summer ride.  Keeps the quads and calves in shape.  At age 62 I've been called the world's oldest active unicyclist but I'm sure there are older ones out there.

 

Pat - Uni

post #58 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patmoore View Post

This is my summer ride.  Keeps the quads and calves in shape.  At age 62 I've been called the world's oldest active unicyclist but I'm sure there are older ones out there.

 

Pat - Uni

 

you should get a muni!!

 

post #59 of 66

No way I'm trying MUNI!!

 

I videoed a Uni Trials competition at Killington a couple years ago.  These guys are amazing.  i borrowed a fat tire uni and was able to hop in place about 20 times but that's about the extent of my skills.  I just do distance riding and nothing more than a dozen miles at a stretch (with a few breaks).

 

post #60 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobody View Post

weight distribution in a turn is totally inverted (turning at high speed on a skate, the skater puts all his/her weight on the inside skate, not on the outside, it would mean a sure fall). 


I don't know how applicable this exactly is to what you're talking about, but short track ice skaters put ALL of their weight the outside leg.  The inside blade doesn't even touch the ice.

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