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What off season sport keeps you in tune for skiing?

post #1 of 66
Thread Starter 

As the ski season winds down, we're all looking toward things to pass the time in summer.  For me its Golf, and MtBiking.

 

Of the two, MtBiking is the thing that translates most to my skiing fitness to keep my reflexes in tune and my instincts on track.

 

What do you do in the off season to keep your fitness and head games on track for next ski season? 

post #2 of 66

A lot of cycling! :o) (and a bit of whitewater kayaking)

 

Not so much "for next season" but just enjoying the same environment of mountains. In fact, for me it's more "what do I do to pass the winter season until I can ride again?".

 

Also, I'll be putting in the hours at work so I can get off in the winter!

 

(Even though I spend a lot more time cycling. I can do that close to home after work or on weekend. Cycling is great in the NE but skiing in NE is boring at best. Hence all the traveling to ski in winter).

post #3 of 66

Id say golf and mt biking as well. also rock climbing and swimming.

post #4 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post

Cycling is great in the NE but skiing in NE is boring at best.


Only if you let it be.

post #5 of 66

Footbag!

 

...and a lot of other stuff.

post #6 of 66

Footbag? What is that? 

post #7 of 66
Thread Starter 

I can see how footbag keeps your feet quick for varied terrain and bump skiing.

 

I plan on doing some more in line skating this summer to work on balance.

 

Skibum do you do much back country skiing?  

 

at_nyc, I'd say skiing in the NE is anything but boring, but then I may be skiing different terrain than you when I make it east.   I'd bet that kayaking helps you keep your instincts in tune for skiing, though.

post #8 of 66

Mostly mountain biking with a few miles on the rail trail.  Flat water kayaking, would like to try an overnight trip this summer.  And finally working so I can afford to ski in the winter.

post #9 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

Footbag? What is that? 


aka:  hacky sack.

 

post #10 of 66

TC...

 

I fall into the 'not to pass the time till ski season' category as well. Skiing is something to do and enjoy while I wait for cycling, paddling, hiking and motorcycling to again be available to me

 

There is always something to enjoy outdoors!

post #11 of 66

Cycling....specifically road and preferably long climbs.....I have dreams of this almost every night

 

just the thought of all that suffering gets my blood cranking

 

post #12 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by UGASkiDawg View Post

Cycling....specifically road and preferably long climbs.....I have dreams of this almost every night

 

just the thought of all that suffering gets my blood cranking

 


Ugh! I'd rather watch someone else do that on TV!

post #13 of 66

Waterskiing. Oh, and I coach baseball from April thru July.

 

Karl

post #14 of 66

UGASkiDawg have you ever done the ride from Rollinsville up Rollins Pass, around the Needles Eye and down into Winter Park? A great ride for sure. Or how about Guanella Pass from Georgetown to Grant?

Boereas Pass from Como to Breck? I just LOVE these rides...

 

post #15 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post

 


aka:  hacky sack.

 

 

you tend to stay out of the instruction forums; ever notice how similar the inside leg action in skiing  is to keeping the footbag in the air with the instep? 

 

 

post #16 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

at_nyc, I'd say skiing in the NE is anything but boring, but then I may be skiing different terrain than you when I make it east.  


Yeah, yea, yeah... I know, bumps and trees. That's what's worth skiing in the NE. But the truth being, half the time there's no coverage in the trees, and the other half of the time the bumps are frozen solid to the consistancy of kitchen tile! It's challenge alright, but all work and not much fun.

 

When I say boring "at best", it's because the chance I actually get to ski SNOW at all is so limited one has to ski whatever terrain available when condition allows. Ice skating on foot long planks doesn't quite count as "skiing" in my book...

 

Quote:

I'd bet that kayaking helps you keep your instincts in tune for skiing, though

I wish that's the case. :-( 

 

My kayaking is still at a stage that I stare too long at the "trees" (a.k.a. rocks) instead of looking at the "openning"! Thank god I have a decent roll... ;-)

 

Mountain biking helps a lot more indeed. Both in building strong quads and instintively picking out the best openning THROUGH the trees instead of fixiated at the trees one doesn't want to hit! The same route picking principles benefits both mountain biking and tree skiing. So yes, singletracking in the woods in the summer does "keep me in tune" with skiing! :o)

 

 

post #17 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post

 


Yeah, yea, yeah... I know, bumps and trees. That's what's worth skiing in the NE. But the truth being, half the time there's no coverage in the trees, and the other half of the time the bumps are frozen solid to the consistancy of kitchen tile! It's challenge alright, but all work and not much fun.

 

 


It's not all about terrain. If you think that skiing on groomers is "boring" then IMHO "you're doing it wrong". I'll ski all the powder I can get, but when I can't I'm certainly not bored with what is left.

post #18 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 


It's not all about terrain. If you think that skiing on groomers is "boring" then IMHO "you're doing it wrong". I'll ski all the powder I can get, but when I can't I'm certainly not bored with what is left.


You got me there. Yes, I think skiing on groomers are boring! :o)
 

 

I already know one of the reason what I'm "doing it wrong": I'm skiing it too slowly. :-( 

 

But with the "usual" crowd of most eastern slopes, I just don't feel comfortable skiing at 2x the speed of the average slope user!

 

Even out west, when the slopes are much quieter, I've had one or two "near misses" while cruising at high(er) speed. I road bike a lot and had only crashed once in the past 10 years. But that one crash at 20+ mph was really nasty. Skiing on groomer, even the "average" speed is 20+! It only take one collision to really, really ruin my season, or life for that matter.

 

Now, how to have "fun" skiing groomers at sub-20 mph or when on a relatively crowded slope, I'm all ears (ok, eyes). ;-)

post #19 of 66

skiing.

post #20 of 66

Ditto.  I told my PT the only way to get ready for skiing was to SKI.  He and the doc wanted me to wait until February, I told them if I had to ski greens until February, I'd do it, but the only way to be ready in February was to start in December.

Quote:
Originally Posted by karpiel View Post

skiing.

 

post #21 of 66

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

 

 

you tend to stay out of the instruction forums; ever notice how similar the inside leg action in skiing  is to keeping the footbag in the air with the instep? 

 

 

Hey, you're right!....... it's not something I've ever noticed.  But it certainly trains left/right separation and absorption movements when you keep the bag in play with the top of your foot.  It's awesome for eye/foot coordination and it's a very good aerobic exercise.

 

Did I mention fun?

 

 

 

 

 

post #22 of 66

watching TV and drinking beer.

post #23 of 66

Golf (walking when I can)

Mountainbiking (hope to get up to Vermont to ride)

Wii (indoor fun)

 

post #24 of 66

Skateboarding around the neighborhood.  Surfing and general beach activities.  Shagging balls for 5-6 year old kids baseball practice and games.  Camping an other stuff with the cub scouts.  Fixing broken stuff on old house and cars.  I'll probably get to dust off the mountain bike next year when/if the kids get more 2 wheel savvy.  Frisbee golf is also probably not too far off the horizon. 

post #25 of 66

It is all about mountain biking for me (although I do plenty of road riding as well). I plan to enter all 7 Ontario Cup races and do several endurance races (8 hour solo affairs). And I have just built my new race bike, a rigid, singlespeed 29er.

post #26 of 66

Nothing's done it for me yet, so this year I am going to try to inline skate with poles on gradual (VERY GRADUAL) hills using a carving technique, not a skating technique.  Been reading about it and it seems very good, some threads on epic about it as well.

 

That said, I'm not a good inline skater and this may not work out so well.  Probably start with not only the usual knee, wrist, elbow pads and helmet, but might wear a hockey goalies outfit!!

 

wish me luck. 

post #27 of 66

I primarily mountain bike in the off-season to keep me entertained and in shape.

post #28 of 66

'Nother mountain biker here, I'm a relative noob.Singletrack is great, but I'm not proud-I'll ride rail trails, rural dirt roads etc.-anything to work up a sweat (and work off pounds). Gotta get the inline skates out too-they've been neglected since I started biking.

post #29 of 66

 For me it's mountain bike and road bike (and if Phil's Wii counts, PS3, LOL). Oh yeah, paintball too.

post #30 of 66

Inline skating for balance, leg strength and cardio.  Also because it's fun.  I love that gliding feeling.  At first I thought I'd try to "carve" on them as practice for skiing, but I've found I like skating for its own sake.  There are miles of paved, flat trails around here, perfect for skating. 

 

Also road biking.  There's a local club that leads a group ride every day.  You wind up riding at a faster pace and longer distances than you would otherwise.  Also I think it's safer riding the road in a large group.

 

I'm new to mountain biking; took it up last year.  I can do easy singletrack; but I go to ground a lot.  I wear elbow and knee/shin armor, but always seem to return from each ride bloodied.  I think I prefer nettles - they sting intensely for 24 hours, but then it's over.  Road/dirt rash is the gift that keeps on giving.  Tegaderm = good.

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