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Dialing down bindings for summer storage - Page 2

post #31 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

You have to go even further than Phil suggests!  Remove all the binding screws and place them in a paper bag, tape it shut, label it, then put them in a drawer for safekeeping.  Take all the binding toe pieces and line them up on the top shelf of a dark closet.  Heel pieces go on the lower shelf.  Make sure they are lined up perfectly.  As we all know, summer storage is all about having the bindings lined up perfectly!

 

http://www.nbc.com/Saturday_Night_Live/video/clips/cooking-with-the-anal-rententive-chef/2867/

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

 

Not paper... plastic! Ziploc is best, and make sure you remove all excess air. When placing on the shelf, keep the right binding, on the right...ect. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j View Post

 

changing yuor tun now??  last spring you were all about hanging toe pieces on the wall exactly 23 1/2 inches apart in an unheated garage.


Yep!  Toe pieces go upside down

 

 

Or put them back in the box

 

post #32 of 55

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skierhj View Post

I don't do it, in my opinion it doesn't really do anything since the springs aren't really tensioned without a boot in the system

Odd claim. Try turning up a Look heel sometime.  In the designs I'm familiar with, the springs aren't sitting there rattling in their perches without a boot in the binding.   I'm sure some old timer will tell me about the binding where that is the case.

 

 Quote:

Originally Posted by madmole View Post

My Atomic Metron X's 2005, been skiied 2 to 3 weeks each year., never been turned down, Tested this year on Spyderjons binding tension machine and they were still spot on. All within 1%

 

So dont bother, not needed

 

Your one pair of bindings passed one functional test one time, ergo all bindings must behave similarly all the time.  Your conclusion is reasonable, but your reasoning isn't.

 

Bravo for having a pair of bindings actually tested by a trained tech.  That makes you more sensible than most people.

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 

I'm going to propose that it could hurt.  Bindings weren't designed or tested to be cranked from zero to 10 and back down over and over and over.  I believe that you increase the risk of failure of everything else in contact with the springs by messing with them more than is necessary.  If it ain't broke, don't fix it...otherwise it just might be broke!  By the way, do you take them to the shop and have them tested and certified after cranking them back up in the fall


Bindings do indeed wear out, and bindings should be tested with some frequency.  But I can tell you that all over the country rental shops turn bindings up and down through their range each and every day for years at a time with low failure rates with (in theory) testing programs much more rigorous than most consumers actually partake in.  I know what your next comment might be, but I urge you to take apart several rental and retail pieces of the same vintage before you make it.  Same bits inside, different stamped mounting arrangement.

 

Don't worry.  Be happy.  The bindings will be fine.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Yep!  Toe pieces go upside down...

 

Nice shop.

 

Here's my thoughts on the subject:

-Some binding manuals make a blanket recommendation that this should be done. I think the Salomon manual says or used to say it in the rental section, but not the retail.  Who knows how useful or correct that sentence was or is?  Skiing is the land of the wives' tale.

-Unless springs are poorly designed and manufactured, they will not creep, set, or sag when used within their design.

-The thing more likely to fail than the steel spring could be the molded plastic housing, a brake, etc.   I think the history of binding recalls shows more bindings recalled due to plastic explosion than anything about springs.  Steels retain strength over a long time in a wide variety of conditions, some plastics haven't done as well as advertised.  Remember that cranked up spring isn't in a vacuum.

-Bindings do wear out, generally by increasing friction from wear and lubricant failure at various points.  This has nothing to do with what you leave your settings at over the summer, and it can only be mitigated/discovered by following the manufacturer's testing and maintenance procedures.

-If there is a tangible benefit to turning bindings down over the summer, why don't we turn them down at the end of each day?  Even a full time pro's bindings spend more time off their feet than on through the ski season.

 

In a couple weeks I'll redo my pine tar and strap my camber blocks between my bases and be ready for summer.

post #33 of 55

Yep, you caught me.  

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 

 

 

 

 


Yep!  Toe pieces go upside down

 

 

Or put them back in the box

 

 

post #34 of 55

Damn, that's like a binding museum! 

post #35 of 55

Do you drain the oil, unscrew the plates and turn down the bindings after summer pole re-calibration?

post #36 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

Do you drain the oil, unscrew the plates and turn down the bindings after summer pole re-calibration?

Every so often I see someone who stores their car on jackstands so the springs won't set.

 

Stupid dies hard.

post #37 of 55

Tightening the spring is preloading it. That is why it takes more effort to crank a higher din down.

 

I don't lower my din for storage.

post #38 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post

 

Every so often I see someone who stores their car on jackstands so the springs won't set.

 

Stupid dies hard.


yes but how does this effect the pole calibration process?
 

post #39 of 55

Finn, you should re-calibrate your poles after a thorough re-test at the start of every season.

Most poles should also be re-calibrated every 30,000 vertical feet of use. Some of the higher end graphite poles have a calibration interval of 100,000vf, but I'd still suggest a more frequent check.

 

 

Back to the topic, I bought my bindings from Nigel Tufnel, so they only go down to 11.

post #40 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post

Back to the topic, I bought my bindings from Nigel Tufnel, so they only go down to 11.

 

Awesome.

 

I have a pair of bindings that must never be used...  They still have the old "tagger" on them...

post #41 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer View Post

 

 

Awesome.

 

I have a pair of bindings that must never be used...  They still have the old "tagger" on them...

Yes, "don't even point at them or look at them"...

post #42 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post

Finn, you should re-calibrate your poles after a thorough re-test at the start of every season.

Most poles should also be re-calibrated every 30,000 vertical feet of use. Some of the higher end graphite poles have a calibration interval of 100,000vf, but I'd still suggest a more frequent check.

 

 

Back to the topic, I bought my bindings from Nigel Tufnel, so they only go down to 11.

Thanks and I will take your advice, interestingly, Nigel's brother sold me a pair that can only be set at 11.I can't turn them down,.....

 

post #43 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 

Yes, "don't even point at them or look at them"...


Yes, but if listen very closely, you can hear the sound of powder washingover the toe piece.....
 

post #44 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

 

Thanks and I will take your advice, interestingly, Nigel's brother sold me a pair that can only be set at 11.I can't turn them down,.....

 


So do they actually go tighter than bindings that go to 10?

post #45 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

 


Yes, but if listen very closely, you can hear the sound of powder washingover the toe piece.....
 


I don't hear anything....

post #46 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

 


Yes, but if listen very closely, you can hear the sound of powder washingover the toe piece.....
 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer View Post

 


I don't hear anything....


That's because Finndog sold them to me.  They still sound great, thanks!

post #47 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer View Post

 


So do they actually go tighter than bindings that go to 10?


It's 1 louder.
 

post #48 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett View Post

 

Every so often I see someone who stores their car on jackstands so the springs won't set.

 

Stupid dies hard.


Car spring most certainly do sag over time, lowering the ride height. OEM springs do not use 'the best materials' compared to say high end aftermarket coils (M&R, Eibach, etc) I know people that have had to put new springs under their car 2 to 3 times over a 100k to keep the ride height where the proper alignment could be achieved....Your service manual will show you how you can check it and you will be unpleasantly surprised.

 

post #49 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer View Post

 


So do they actually go tighter than bindings that go to 10?


yes, infinitely, I don't think they make ones that go higher, Do they? I mean, it's 11, that's higher than 10....
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer View Post

 


I don't hear anything....


That's because you don't have powder in UP! :)
 

post #50 of 55

"What we do if we need that - extra push over the cliff - is we turn it up to 11."

 

 

post #51 of 55

Did anybody but me ever think the scene where they make the Stonehenge diagram and label it in inches instead of feet wouldn't have gone down that way becayse being English, wouldn't they have been prone to use the metric system measurements?

post #52 of 55

maybe, is there a metric measurement to use when turning down my bindings? Is a 1/2 turn in US the same in Metric-speak? Like 14 pounds is a stone.......  Calling Sir Fox.......

post #53 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

 


yes, infinitely, I don't think they make ones that go higher, Do they? I mean, it's 11, that's higher than 10....
 

 


That's because you don't have powder in UP! :)
 


You screwed 'em both up.....

 

To the first question...  Do they go tighter than the ones that go to 10?  Answer:

"Well, it's one tighter, isn't it"

 

Response #2, to:  I don't hear anything.

 

"You would, though.....  if you were skiing.."

 

 

 

 

 

And by the way, we do have powder in the U.P.    We got almost 300 inches of snow this year.  Here is a shot of our webcam from THIS MORNING:

 

post #54 of 55

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post


Car spring most certainly do sag over time,

 

Some (not all) OEM and aftermarket springs do, yes.  The mechanisms that create plastic deformation in the material are sensitive to strain rate...near zero sitting there doing nothing if you choose reasonable materials/designs and aren't in a fire.  This is another instance of someone coming to a dubious conclusion from the data they have.  Car springs sag?  Put the car on jackstands.  Bindings wear out? Turn down the indicated settings.  Phrased another way, if your springs (binding or otherwise) are going to fail just sitting there, they are guaranteed to fail in use, doing what springs are intended to do. 

 

For both a street car and a ski binding, a little bit of this failure is not a problem.  It is only a problem if it continues to progress...and if so, there was no way you were going to stop it outside of taking the spring out of its perches and putting it in a drawer.

 

On the subject of bindings failing, few fail in the direction that indicates a failed spring.  Most become too hard to release and need adjustments relaxing the springs until such adjustments are so large as to be out of standard.  The most bizarre part of this old tale is that people are recognizing that bindings don't work like the day you buy them forever, yet their reaction to that rarely involves actually testing the function of their bindings.

post #55 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by U.P. Racer View Post

 


You screwed 'em both up.....

 

To the first question...  Do they go tighter than the ones that go to 10?  Answer:

"Well, it's one tighter, isn't it"

 

Response #2, to:  I don't hear anything.

 

"You would, though.....  if you were skiing.."

 

 

 

And by the way, we do have powder in the U.P.    We got almost 300 inches of snow this year.  Here is a shot of our webcam from THIS MORNING:

 

 

Arrgghh!  Yes, you are correct, I havent watched that scene in years, I will go and watch it now. I know y get powder, it's just a joke dude! You get far more than NJ. 
 

 

OK I watched it, much funnier your way ! :)
 

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