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Skis knocking together at the front

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I only have this problem occasionally, but I'm wondering what causes it.  Sometimes when I'm making a turn, I am aware of the front of my skis knocking together.  It doesn't happen all the time.  Sometimes I can ski all day without it happening.  I think that it is when I am sitting back on the skis that this happens...we skied in some pretty deep powder this last weekend.  My husband says that it's not necessarily because I'm sitting back.  I "reason" that if there is pressure on the fronts of the skis, they can't move and therefore can't knock together.  What do you think?

post #2 of 18

I think you're reasoning is pretty good.

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

So, are you supposed to put your weight back a little in powder snow so that the skis "float."  I suppose there's a fine line between just right and too far back.

post #4 of 18

In general, you do need to keep the ski tips up. But leaning back is not the preferred way to do this. If you close your ankles (i.e. lift your toes in the boots), this will raise the tips up and keep the weight centered.

post #5 of 18

On packed snow the knocking tips could be possibly due to a poor ski tune, and likely due to your weight distribution.

 

On packed snow you want your weight either on or just behind the ball of your outside foot.

 

In deep snow you want your weight on the centers of both feet.  Never back unless the snow is so wet and heavy that you won't reach the bottom of the hill unless you keep the tips up.  Otherwise, you don't need to see the tips of your skis until your in the lift line.

 

Some skis are just hard work to ski in powder snow.  They don't want to float.  Others float like a dream.

 

I disagree with the weak-muscle movement of dorsiflexion (pulling up on your feet/closing the ankle) to center your position.  I much prefer to use the stronger hamstring muscles to pull the feet back under the hips.  Lifting the toes tenses my feet, and I don't ski well at all with tense feet.

post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thank you both for the suggestions.  I HAVE thought about bringing my feet back under my hips, and it seemed to help.  I will try both of your suggestions.  Thanks!

post #7 of 18

Skis knocking together but not when sitting back is a classic example of being over canted. That is, too much inside edge. Pressure on the front of the skis causes them to turn towards each other. Sitting back takes the pressure off the tips and helps the problem.

The "fix" is to visit your bootfitter and get properly canted. There is no substitute or "movement pattern" that will properly correct it. On the other hand proper alignment will bring instant results. The last 5% makes 90% of the difference.

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post #8 of 18

Skifox,

 

You didn't mention when during the turn that your tips hit together.  If it is when you are just starting a turn, it could be caused by you not releasing the edge of your old outside ski, and starting to twist (or turn) the new outside ski.  This is quite common, especially on steeper terrain.  The old outside ski is still engaged and gets in the way of the new outside in the next turn.

 

If this is the case, it is quite easy to fix.

 

RW

post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 

I was going to say at the end of the turn, and it's usually on very steep terrain.  But after reading your explanation, maybe it is REALLY just before starting the next turn!

post #10 of 18

Skifox,

 

The fix is easy!  Think of flattening and tipping the downhill ski before you start your new turn.  It takes a little patience, especially on steeper terrain.  A drill on steeps is to add a short traverse between turns.  This gives you time to think of releasing the downhill ski before making the next turn.  As you get it, shorten the traverse until you are linking turns, but still flattening the downhill ski.

 

Hope this helps.

 

RW

post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks!

post #12 of 18

Interesting -- I notice that most of my skis have nicks only on the right side (skier's right) of both tips (I switch skis interchangeably).  So that suggests that one of my turns is a little out of whack -- probably the right turn, as that would be the time the left edge of the inside ski is up off the snow and able to ding the into the right side of the outside ski tip.  Make sense?  Anybody have thoughts on that? 

post #13 of 18

Skier219,

 

Being a little hesitant to commit to the right turn is common.

 

RW

post #14 of 18

How about that -- is it a right-handed phenomena?  Do lefties have the opposite problem?  I definitely notice that one of my turns is stronger than the other, just haven't really paid attention to it, and being an engineer I can't tell my left from my right most of the time anyhow.

post #15 of 18

skier219,

 

Quote:

How about that -- is it a right-handed phenomena?  Do lefties have the opposite problem?  I definitely notice that one of my turns is stronger than the other, just haven't really paid attention to it, and being an engineer I can't tell my left from my right most of the time anyhow.

Most skiers have a strong side, although I have found that being right or left handed doesn't dictate which side is stronger.  It is a neural developmental thing.  With practice, the weaker side will develope (along with the confidence) to closer symmetry.

 

RW

post #16 of 18

Most strong-sidedness is related to favorite foot syndrome rather than whether the skier is left or right handed.  We all favor one foot more than the other.  Think about where you stand when you're doing something stationary like washing the dishes.  Or which foot does the supporting when you put one foot up on the bar rail???

 

Typically, the favored foot is the one that doesn't want to let go when it's the outside foot of the old turn and you want to start a new turn.

 

If your ski shovels are nicked only on the right hand side when you look down at them,  that means the right ski edge is cutting into the left shovel, most likely during left turns.  I'd work on the flattening of the left ski to release it into left turns and then continuing to use the left ski actively during those turns. 

post #17 of 18

Thanks guys -- I will pay attention to this next season and see what's going on.  It occurred  to me that I could aim my helmet cam down at the skis and carve some turns to see what's happening -- that ought to look interesting from a first-person point of view.

post #18 of 18

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

...It occurred  to me that I could aim my helmet cam down at the skis and carve some turns to see what's happening -- that ought to look interesting from a first-person point of view.

...And for anyone in front of you.    

 

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