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What fat ski can you carve on? - Page 2

post #31 of 39

We all know that skinny skis are better for carving.

post #32 of 39

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by karpiel View Post

We all know that skinny skis are better for carving.

heh heh heh... thank you

 

post #33 of 39

I'm sure my answer would be biased on the slim side, but only because I haven't tried wider skis.

 

I'm also sure I could truly carve on any ski that didn't have a reverse or otherwise strange sidecut.

 

The difference I've noticed between skis is not if the skis will carve, but how many g's you can get them to give you in a turn (of the size the skis were designed for).

post #34 of 39

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

I'm sure my answer would be biased on the slim side, but only because I haven't tried wider skis.

 

I'm also sure I could truly carve on any ski that didn't have a reverse or otherwise strange sidecut.

 

The difference I've noticed between skis is not if the skis will carve, but how many g's you can get them to give you in a turn (of the size the skis were designed for).

/end thread.

post #35 of 39

190 Moment Bibby.  Amazingly good.

post #36 of 39

"Carving" on firm snow with my ObSethed is about as fun as rollerblading on ice

post #37 of 39

When it comes to carving on fat skis, I think the bindings make a big difference.

 

I recently picked up a pair of Gotamas mounted with Dukes. While I certainly didn't buy them primarily for groomers, I was curious to see how they'd handle hard packed, steeper trails.

 

On trails like White Nitro at Sugarloaf, and Tightline at Saddleback, I was blown away by how well they carved on firm surfaces. Certainly not as quick edge-to-edge as my Fischer RX-8s , but certainly not sluggish, either. Very easy to get them on edge, very solid, strong,  and stable in the carve, and very smooth in transitioning to the next turn.

 

I was expecting them to be "pretty good" in this department, but they far exceeded my expectations. My gut feeling is that the Dukes, with their wider footprint and their overall beefiness, had a lot to do with the ease of getting this ski on edge and the overall solid, stable sensation when carving high speed turns on steep firm surfaces.

 

post #38 of 39

seems to be some confusion on what is carving. A carved turn is one in which the direction change is purely made by rolling the ski onto its edges and then following the arc, with no rotational or skidding involved. In fact, if you just edge the ski, then you will get a turn with a radius equal to the skis natural turn radius; however, if you also "work" the ski, by pressuring the tip of the ski at the beginning of the turn it can be bent into a tighter turn shape than its radius - this is how the old school racers on straight 220 cm race skis could still carve superbly and vary the turn shape. Any skis, fat or skinny, as long as they have decent edges and reasonable torsional stiffness, will be able to carve clean arcs with a skillful rider.The variables will be the speed from edge to edge (quicker as you get narrower, obviously) and the rebound / energy put in by the skis, obviously greater for stiffer race type skis and less for the freeride type skis.

post #39 of 39

My Mavens arc fine on groomers. 139 underfoot. (Only 112cm of running length)

 

I will admit, however, that the torque from that width is exhausting.

 

All you need is sidecut. Carving is not rocket science. You put the ski on edge, it arcs.

 

Racing is a science because it is about generating speed through the turn. Anyone can carve a turn on anything with sidecut.

 

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