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Slightly fat "skidder" ski for mom/dad

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone,

 trying to dial in some better skis more versatile skis for my parents.Both are intermediate level skiers, dont ski hard and don't ski all day.

 

Dad, 69 years old, currently on Fischer RX6, approx 66 cm waist.  Skis groomed greens and blues, might play in small bumps at the edge.  Good strength, tends to pivot/stem the skis.  Home area:  Blue Mountain, with 1-2 trips out west.     

    Looking for an easy turning ski for him.  Does NOT carve, no desire to ski fast.  Trips out west often have fresh snow (like Steamboat last week) , and then his RX6's are way skinny.  Since he doesnt carve and doesnt turn quickly, I think a wider waisted frontside ski would be good for him, maybe 80 +/-, with little downside even on a pure groomer day.

 

Mom:  67 years, currently on Elan Wave Magic.  Tecnhique:  solid intermediate, but with excessive rotary (shoulders).  No desire to ski fast.  Somewhat (visually) intimidated by the 'push-piles' of snow that develop out west, even on groomers. Probably around 80 +/- would also be a good size

 

As my quiver is frontside carver (RX8/Speedwave12), a mogul ski, and a Watea 94, I have no personal experience in the slice of the category.

 

Thanks for reading and for any comments or suggestions

brad

 


Edited by docbrad66 - 4/9/2009 at 07:17 pm GMT
post #2 of 22

Dad might like the Rossi Phantom 80's.

 

Not sure about mom.

 

post #3 of 22

How about the narrower Bandit/Phantom line? Good solid skis that are turned up tails for easy turns, forgiving but not spagetti soft, mid-fat for good float, light weight, and not very fast.

 

Get them a matching male/female set.

post #4 of 22

I'm inclined to think that going to an 80 waist may not be such a good idea for where and how they ski. Even though they don't carve, something like the Dynastar Contact for Dad, and Exclusive Fluid for Mom might be the ticket.  They're easier to get on edge than an 80 mm ski, will hold on hardpack and ice much better for a place like Blue Mountain, and they've got a wide enough shovel and a decent flex - stiffness mix to handle heavier or deeper snow out West.  And, they're versatile enough that you can use every technique imaginable - skid, pivot, carve, stem, wedeln, pedal hop..... Just a thought. 

post #5 of 22

Tough call, if they are really set in their ways, going a little fatter might only make them skid more.  After all, the fatter the ski, the more work it takes to get it on edge.  If they only skid their narrow skis they might find themselves going to fast on a wider ski and feel real uncomfortable.  If you insist on getting them new skis I would stick around 75 to 80 mm waist and look at the options and reviews for good intermediate skis, there are a lot of them and as many opinions of what is good as there are options.  My suggestion is if you like a brand, find something in that category. 

post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 

Go Blue,

 I think the Contact for sure and most likely the Fluid would be too much ski for them.   Getting on edge and edge hold arent really where their skiing is.  My thought is this:  since they dont rail or make short radius sudden turns, an easy turning 80 mm +/- ski would work just as well or very close, but give them much more comfort on loose or piled up snow when out west

 

But I will dig up reviews and add those skis to the consideration list

 

Thanks

Brad (ann arbor)

post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hi Bob4snow,

 I guess i dont see skidding / skidding more as a bad thing, at least for how they ski.  They sorta "Sunday Drive" down groomed blues and greens.  Why do you think they would ski faster on a wider ski?

 

I guess i should also say I dont want "a better ski for them"  i want a ski "that is better suited to them", ie its not performance but rather appropriateness.

 

Many of the reviews here are geared at level 9 +/- skiers, and/or off piste.  They are lon-piste, evel 6,will never be much higher and thats fine for them.  But getting a bit lost/knocked around on new snow days out west is what i'd like to address.

 

Thanks

brad

 

post #8 of 22

a little feedback. I think the new Phantom series is a bit stiff, an expert level ski. Agree that around mid 70's mm waist width makes sense. more width makes edging tedious, less width is a bit over-sensitive to snow features and obstacles.

 

In general, a ski with less sidecut from waist to tail is more versatile with respect to ski technique, including old school tail slip turns. compare the measurement between skis: subtract the waist from the tail width and get a number for several skis you are considering. the lower that number, the more versatile the ski with respect to tail sliding. more sidecut from waist to tip is a good thing for easy turning, provided the tip has some tortional softness (soft twist).

 

Dynastar has been making skis like this for a long time (used to call it pin tail, until they may have discovered that skiers didn't like the term). Narrowr versions of the Legend series are cool. don't know the other models.

 

post #9 of 22

[quote]

Go Blue,

 I think the Contact for sure and most likely the Fluid would be too much ski for them.  [/quote]

 

Those (assuming you're talking not talking about the Contact 10 or 4x4) should be pretty easy for anyone who's not a total beginner to handle.

 

Head Xenons (maybe the 7.0) might also work well.  I don't know if they have a women's version of them.

 

K2 Apache Recons might fit in a similar category.

 

Almost any ski in the 70-80mm range that's not explicitly a race/expert ski will probably work.

 

I'd think more towards 70mm than 80mm, but it depends on how much soft snow/crud you expect.

post #10 of 22

Salomon Lord/Lady 

post #11 of 22

you've got to be kidding. OP, this couldn't be farther from what you need. it is possible to totally waste one's time here. Quote:

Originally Posted by epic View Post

Salomon Lord/Lady 



 

post #12 of 22

I like the present skis your folks have with two caveats...proper tuning and being sure they aren't too long & stiff for them.

 

I see no reason why wider skis might be easier to turn.  The skis they have will turn for them with the slightest edging.  Wider skis are harder to put on edge and get the ski's sidecut to turn the skis.

 

I'd be sure their skis are well tuned with a 1° base edge bevel and flat bottoms, and probably a 2° side edge bevel.  For them, I'd dull the tips & tails ( which I'd never dull for anyone who knows how to put their skis on edge.)

 

Be very sure these old style skiers have skis short & soft enough for them.  Their skis should be no more than nose high, and maybe no more than chin high, for them, of a line of skis for intermediate skiers.  As skis are made longer, they are made stiffer.  It isn't a matter of ski length per se, but a matter of the ski's stiffness suiting the skier's weight, height, skiing speed, and energy the skier puts into their skis.

 

Also make sure these skiers have modern boots of suitable flexibility for them.

 

In any case, don't even think of buying new skis for them without giving them a few demo runs on the skis.  Buy the skis that put the biggest smiles on their faces.

post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias99 View Post

[quote]

Go Blue,

 I think the Contact for sure and most likely the Fluid would be too much ski for them.  [/quote]

 

Quote:

Those (assuming you're talking not talking about the Contact 10 or 4x4) should be pretty easy for anyone who's not a total beginner to handle.

 

Thanks for pointing this out - I was in fact thinking of the high performance versions.

 

post #14 of 22

The Dynastar Legend 3800 for your dad.  The ski has a 75 mm waist, is super easy to turn, will handle any type of skiing style and turn shape, and it super friendly and very forgiving.  The shovel is wide enough to handle a little powder.  It has a wood core and it is for intermediate to non-aggressive advanced skiers.  You can get the ski on ebay on as little as $99.  It comes flat.

post #15 of 22

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias99 View Post

[quote]

Go Blue,

 I think the Contact for sure and most likely the Fluid would be too much ski for them.  [/quote]

 

Those (assuming you're talking not talking about the Contact 10 or 4x4) should be pretty easy for anyone who's not a total beginner to handle.

 

Head Xenons (maybe the 7.0) might also work well.  I don't know if they have a women's version of them.

 

K2 Apache Recons might fit in a similar category.

 

Almost any ski in the 70-80mm range that's not explicitly a race/expert ski will probably work.

 

I'd think more towards 70mm than 80mm, but it depends on how much soft snow/crud you expect.



 

Exactly so. I was thinking of the Contact, not the Contact 10 or Contact 4x4 for Dad, and the Exclusive Fluid, not the Exclusive Limited for Mom - those are more forgiving than the performance models, and should not be too much ski for them.

post #16 of 22

My normal ski-buying advice also applies:

 

1) Make sure they've got good boots.  If they have been in the same boots for a long time, or were never really in great boots to begin with, your first stop might be at a good bootfitter.

 

2) Someone else mentioned this, but if at all possible get them to demo a few different skis.

post #17 of 22

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

you've got to be kidding. OP, this couldn't be farther from what you need. it is possible to totally waste one's time here. Quote:



 


Not kidding, but its nice to know that we all have our own opinions isn't it?

post #18 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the tip.  Got a pair of these (flat) for $122 free shipping (Amazon).  Come December, we'll see how it works.

 

brad 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post

The Dynastar Legend 3800 for your dad.  The ski has a 75 mm waist, is super easy to turn, will handle any type of skiing style and turn shape, and it super friendly and very forgiving.  The shovel is wide enough to handle a little powder.  It has a wood core and it is for intermediate to non-aggressive advanced skiers.  You can get the ski on ebay on as little as $99.  It comes flat.



 

post #19 of 22

The comment about the new Phantom SC80 being "stiff," and "an expert level ski" is wrong IMHO. I'm 59, 175 lb, 6 ft, and a  solid intermediate. I demoed the Phantom in 175cm and found it be very stable and forgiving. It was no work at all on blue and green groomers. Very easy to turn, almost intuitive. I have other 80mm skis that are more work than the Phantom. It skids easily and will carve if you insist. A very friendly ski. Match it up with the Voodoo for Mom and you are looking at a winning team. The Dynastar 3800 may be a good choice for an older skier, but it never sold that well and ended up being more popular among telemarkers than with downhill skiers. 

post #20 of 22

I would also recommend the K2 Recon; although I haven''t tried it for years. As long as they haven't made it much more meaty, it would be an excellent choice. It had a nice flex to it and could be used in a variety of conditions, with the only problem when you really push it at high speed and boilerplate conditions - it would skid out significantly. But, otherwise, it would be a fine choice for an easy-going all purpose ski.

 

Nick

post #21 of 22

VERY Serious  I bought some Moment Spades for my 68 year old Mom SHE LOVES THEM

She had an immeriate and drastic increase in confidence on the wider ski.

 

http://www.momentskis.com/

 

For your Mom

 

http://www.momentskis.com/spade.html

 

For your Dad

http://www.momentskis.com/renofreebird.html

 

Or

http://www.momentskis.com/tahoe.html

post #22 of 22

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MTT View Post

VERY Serious  I bought some Moment Spades for my 68 year old Mom SHE LOVES THEM

She had an immeriate and drastic increase in confidence on the wider ski.

 

http://www.momentskis.com/

 

For your Mom

 

http://www.momentskis.com/spade.html

 

For your Dad

http://www.momentskis.com/renofreebird.html

 

Or

http://www.momentskis.com/tahoe.html


Serious virus/trojan horse. Just click on the first link and see what I mean
 

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