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What's the best fat ski for knee-deep cascade concrete? - Page 2

post #31 of 43

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post

When did this turn into a thread about antiquing rather than solving the OP's question/issue in the most effective way possible? Just curious...

 

 

You must be reading a different thread than the rest of us. 

post #32 of 43

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

 


Me too, but finances dictate that having a ski for 3-4 days a year just isn't going to fly with my wife! 


A rocker ski doesn't have to be a 3-4 day a year ski.

post #33 of 43

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 


A rocker ski doesn't have to be a 3-4 day a year ski.

 

 

At least not as far as a wife knows**

 

Fine print:

**unless your wife knows her ski gear, in which case you're screwed.

 

post #34 of 43

Can someone please explain what a rockered ski is? I have only recently heard the term.

 

Also, Steve Smith seems to have found just what you are looking for: $25 on Craigslist. Antiquing worked well for him. And I can verify how manky the snow from this storm was. I was at Loveland yesterday and even at 12,500 feet it felt like coastal snow. Today it must have been just the kind of conditions you were describing. Good luck, Lew

 

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/83408/good-deal-or-museum-piece


Edited by LewBob - 4/19/2009 at 04:23 pm GMT
post #35 of 43

i just bot season end demos - 4 frnt ehp without trying them!  all of my buds on the mountain just said to buy them if I could get a great price - they claim that you have a really tough time having the tips bury.  Won't know till next year whether it was good but for serious pow days, I just want to be wider and I'll switch back to my other skis if need be.  

 

BTW I'm 6'2" and weigh 230, so wider may be my savior in power and crud!

post #36 of 43

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by im50now View Post

i just bot season end demos - 4 frnt ehp without trying them!  all of my buds on the mountain just said to buy them if I could get a great price - they claim that you have a really tough time having the tips bury.  Won't know till next year whether it was good but for serious pow days, I just want to be wider and I'll switch back to my other skis if need be.  

 

BTW I'm 6'2" and weigh 230, so wider may be my savior in power and crud!



 

if you are any good at all, you should be happy with those skis. i hope you went with the 193 length, though, or at LEAST the 186

post #37 of 43

I can speak from lots of experience with similar snow in the Sierra.

 

Since you're looking for a wider complement to the 88s, I think you'd want to go at least about an inch wider (~110mm+ waist) and with a different profile. 

 

I've discovered that in heavy maritime snow, I don't care for wider skis with deeper sidecuts and shorter turning radii.  They sacrifice stability and predictability for a turniness that, IMHO anyway, is counterproductive.  I've also found that the skis that I've tried with super-wide tips -- the Icelantic Shaman and Moment Comi, both 160mm tips -- had a tendency to get tossed around in cut up heavy snow.

 

I love my 195 Praxis Powders in the conditions you describe.  They float like crazy and turn on a dime.  They're not a lot of fun on a groomer until it softens, but that's not what you're looking for anyway.  With reverse camber and sidecut, they will be a diametric choice with your Monsters, but that's not a bad thing for a two-ski quiver.

 

Last weekend, I tried the 190 Moment Ruby in spring conditions and fell in love.  Not super wide -- 140/112/130 -- and normal camber and sidecut, but they still had great float and massive stability.  I haven't skied the Monsters, but I imagine they have much the same feel.  Mine arrive tomorrow.  (Also in this category, the 192 PM Gear Big Bros, 143/114.5/132, or to add some rocker in the tip, the 196 Lhasa Pows.)

post #38 of 43

I would highly recommend going as fat under foot as you can go. The problem with skiing snow that is stiff is that if your outside edge stays under the snow, your finished. You want a ski you can 'smoosh' around on top of the snow; think 'spreading butter'. My Elan Quad Ones (M Series 1111) are 161 - 121 - 141 and 184cm long. They let me (5'9" 200lbs.) stay on top and work the snow, rather than the snow working me. They have a 20.3 m radius as well so they ski (kind of) like modern skis. You may need to sit back a bit to get the tips up to get going, but you can also drive the Quad 1111s through just about anything and they'll stay near the surface.

 

FWIW, when skiing powder, don't just think about flotation, think about the same technique you use to ski hard pack: balance (fore and aft as well as laterally), turn initiation (roll your knees to start the turn) and stick to the fall line.

 

Doug

post #39 of 43
Thread Starter 

We have a winner - i ended up buying a pair of black diamond megawatts.  I took them out on two somewhat different days.  The first day was a Friday, about 3 days after a storm dumped 6-7 inches of our best PNW pancake batter onto the ground, and the day after said 6-7 inches of snow was sprinkled with some light rain. Temperatures were in the low-to-mid 40s.  This was in mid-late april - the mountain (Mt. Hood Meadows) had been pretty empty for that week, and i was able to find a good amount of untracked and lightly tracked snow stashed away. 

 

The skis were simply outstanding in these conditions.  I've never had so much fun in crud.  The skis glided on top of everything, and were cake to turn.  I sought out the worst snow i could find, and the skis ate everything up.  I took my Monster 88s out for a run the same day -  they were so much more work - i had to jump my turns, and was generally just much more bogged down.  They performed admirably, but they skied in the snow, whereas the megawatts stayed on top.

 

The second day was the following sunday - about 60-65 degrees and sunny.  The previous day had been warm too, and the snow did not set up much overnight.  Melting snow everywhere, water running through the parking lot like a river, deep, sun-melted junk in heather canyon.  Every turn down Accordion set off slides of slush that went all the way to the bottom of the hill.  Again, the skis ate it up.  I was laughing out loud.  This was the type of snow that i used to go out of my way to avoid, and i couldn't get enough of it.

 

The shocker to me was that the megawatts are actually fine on the groomed.  They would't be my go-to skis for a day of crusing, but they handled much just like a big, slow version of an ordinary ski, rather than something exotic (which is what i expected).

 

Again, thanks for all of the feedback.  All of the PNW locals who said "go fat and rockered" swayed me toward trying the megawatts.  I'm very happy that i went to a 125 waist instead of something narrower.  Can't wait till next season when i get to try them in some pow!

 

Matt

 

post #40 of 43

For Wester heavier new snow and crud, I belive the ,most solid and evolved design is any ski that is pintail minimal sidecut medium stiff some tip rocker.  And LONGER THAN YOU THINK

 

Note that EVERY ski manufacture in the big ski market has put out a ski with this design or is doing so this year. And came out with a longer version of said Ski.

 

post #41 of 43

oh yeah - 193's 

post #42 of 43

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

Speaking from experience, rockers (when used in-bounds) seem to be much more popular amongst skiers  that typically rely more on rotary technique, want a pivot point underfoot, and aren't really on the cuff of the boot.  Faster, more aggressive skiers who are skiing dynamically with lots of edge angle and know how to release an edged ski in deep snow tend toward more of a Pro Rider XXL or Gotama type ski, which is the type about 98% of the good skiers I saw at Squaw on a new snow day recently were on.


Good point, but skis that have tip rocker and flat tail are great for skiers who like to carve turns, allowing for a more forward stance in soft snow and avoiding edge catches. Skis like the Salomon Rocker, Rossignol RC 112 and Dynastar Big Dump all fit that category.

post #43 of 43
Quote: I used some lib-tech n.a.s.'s last weekend. they are about 110 115 under foot. great powder, wet ski
Originally Posted by Matt_H View Post

 

All - I'm currently a one-ski-quiver skier, but recently found the limits of my quiver.  I'm therefore seeking advice on what I should demo to double the size of my ski collection.  I'm 6', 205 lbs, and am probably best classified as a level 9 skier. I ski mostly on Mt. Hood, but will probably spend about a week each year in the Rockies for vacation. My current skis are 186cm Head Monster IM88s.  I love these skis - i have found them to be great in *almost* all conditions that i encounter out here.  I thought they were great in all conditions until a fairly recent day at Mt. Hood Meadows.  The snow was from mid-calf to mid-thigh deep, and was very wet and heavy.  I found that in the knee-deep and deeper snow, these skis dove to the bottom.  i had to point them straight down the hill (in the trees of lower Heather Canyon) and lean a little bit back to get the tips up to get any float.  it was a blast pointed straight down hill, but when soon as i turned, they dove again.  I've never had this happen in lighter snow (of similar depth) or less-deep crud. 

 

Given my size, my love of my Monsters, and the oft-heavy snow of my local hill, can anyone suggest some good demos?  Also, how much fatter than 88mm should i think about going?  i've never been on anything fatter than this, so i have no personal data points on how fat skis ride.  Would 105 be fat enough, or should i be looking at something like 120?  All opinions are appreciated - thanks!

 

Matt

 

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