EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › volkl powerswitch/rossignol multix arms
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

volkl powerswitch/rossignol multix arms - Page 2

post #31 of 44

Ah, you guys are being too hard on the video -- that's actually some real advanced skarving  .   The iM82s are great in that respect -- not all skis will let you skarve turn after turn, all the way down the hill.  For instance, the TigerShark is pretty lousy because it only really wants clean carves from the skier.  What good is that?!?!  

post #32 of 44

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

Ah, you guys are being too hard on the video -- that's actually some real advanced skarving  .   The iM82s are great in that respect -- not all skis will let you skarve turn after turn, all the way down the hill.  For instance, the TigerShark is pretty lousy because it only really wants clean carves from the skier.  What good is that?!?!  

 

lol

post #33 of 44

Ah, somebody finally spoke up about the emperor's new clothes. 

 

skier219, there is a Chinese parable about a mischievous boy who hid in a shady tree.

 

One day, a philosopher (name escapes me at the moment) sat under said shady tree, unaware of the boy's presence.  The boy urinated upon the guy, and laughed.  The philosopher immediately lept to his feet in obvious anger, but quickly relented, and then smiled back at the boy.  He left a yuan (a unit of currency) on the spot on which he had sat, and simply left.

 

The boy was slightly puzzled, but of course was doubly-delighted at both the accomplishment of his trick, and the fact that it paid off, strangely enough.  He was encouraged.

 

The next day, the boy hid in the tree again and another man rested under the tree.  The boy proceeded to urinate on this guy too.  This time, the bandit wrenched the boy from the tree and immediately split him in two.

 

The end.

 

Lessons?

1.  I guess the Brothers Grimm don't have a monopoly on gruesome tales.

 

2.  Sometimes, Chinese philosophers can be evil dicks.

 


Edited by DtEW - 4/20/2009 at 02:14 am GMT
post #34 of 44

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

Ah, you guys are being too hard on the video -- that's actually some real advanced skarving  .   The iM82s are great in that respect -- not all skis will let you skarve turn after turn, all the way down the hill.  For instance, the TigerShark is pretty lousy because it only really wants clean carves from the skier.  What good is that?!?!  


maybe thatt's the indian , and NOT the arrows??????????
 

post #35 of 44

Hopefully with continued hard work I will advance my level further.

 

Meanwhile "Reach" went unfortunately silent after my accepting his kind in-person skiing invitation, though not affecting my ultimately having a great 60th ski day of this season today at Killington. The skiing on Superstar was enoyable both yesterday and today, though the conditions were quite different between the two days.. Unfortunately, none of the real experts seem to want to ski in-person or provide us with video footage of them skiing!

 

I have no issues with the video I posted of myself which IMO was excellent technique for those particular skiing conditions. "Ghost" aptly and fairly pointed out the skiing conditions as he commented on the technique used, which is very fair as the skiing conditions indeed dictated a balance between carved and steered turns over the changing surface (varied depths of frozen granular atop boiler plate ice). Grippy hero snow is easy for us all to carve deeply all the time, the key IMO is how we adapt our skiing to all conditions on all terrain.

post #36 of 44

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

Unfortunately, none of the real experts seem to want to ski in-person or provide us with video footage of them skiing!


You (continue) to miss the point. Many of us, who can demonstrate (at absolute minimum) the skill in the video certainly wouldn't think in a million years to call ourselves "high level experts", since we know of, and/or ski with people who truly fulfill that statement, so we don't want to look foolish. As said to Dan Quayle during a VP debate- "you ain't no Jack Kennedy", well you ain't no high level expert (me neither, but I'm better than you).

 

Really dude - reality check and get-a-clue time - go somewhere real far from NH and ski with the big boys then have a chuckle about your video and claims of what a "high level expert" skis like. Truly.

 

Try some Matchstick or TGR ski porn for a basic clue, or go to WB, JH, Altabird etc., observe and figure it out for yourself. I don't do K-Mart anymore (life's too short), but if you want to do WB in three weeks let me know, and we'll scope out some real expert terrain where I'd be pleased to take as much video as you'd like. You're making excuses about your skiing of some flat NH terrain for the video, someplace real should make for a laugh riot.

post #37 of 44

(Post deleted for bad karma.)


Edited by DtEW - 4/20/2009 at 06:08 am GMT
post #38 of 44

Just to be clear, if you prefer carving arc-to-arc, then you probably would prefer the Volkls, even in those conditions, though I can't be sure (not having skied them, just going by specs and hand flexing/twisting).  I know I would be arcing turns in those conditions, but that's my background.  I never took all those steered-turn lessons; I just got race skis and learned how to go faster.  Personally, what I seem to enjoy most is carving larger radius turns at high speed.  Choosing a ski with high torsional rigidity, good stiffness, and matching the turn radius you want to make to the ski so you can arc 'em, and then doing it, is how I have the most fun.

 

However, if you are not skiing pure arc to pure arc turns, whether by choice or otherwise, those Volkls are not for you.  They would be fine smearing on hardpack, but not in variable conditions.  IMHO, of course.

post #39 of 44

Ghost: The day I tried the PS Tigersharks the conditions were pretty similar (frozen underneath with varying soft on top), though there were some spots where the surface snow was maybe a bit grippier. I never warmed up to those skis at all though.

 

This season I've tended to move away from making a continual series of back to back GS turns at speed as you describe (and Craig described as clean carves) towards turning a lot more often and mixing up my turn shapes and frequency based on slope features. Some of that is probably the influence of the Monster 82 this season. Though the Monster 82 isn't a great carver on hard surface conditions it handles the piles and softer surfaces very well, and is a nice package over a wide range of conditions. OTOH, my Stockli Laser SL carves very well on hard surface conditions but is not as much fun over such a wide range of conditions.

post #40 of 44
Thread Starter 

Ok thank you all for your help

post #41 of 44

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boomernickel View Post

Ok thank you all for your help


You start some interesting threads and duck out early with a "k, thanks." after your question is answered. I really like your style. Keep up the good work.

post #42 of 44

(I delete a lot of responses, huh?)

post #43 of 44

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DtEW View Post

(I delete a lot of responses, huh?)


:(. I hate wondering what you actually wrote. Thanks you jerk...

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

Hopefully with continued hard work I will advance my level further.

 

Meanwhile "Reach" went unfortunately silent after my accepting his kind in-person skiing invitation, though not affecting my ultimately having a great 60th ski day of this season today at Killington. The skiing on Superstar was enoyable both yesterday and today, though the conditions were quite different between the two days.. Unfortunately, none of the real experts seem to want to ski in-person or provide us with video footage of them skiing!

 

I have no issues with the video I posted of myself which IMO was excellent technique for those particular skiing conditions. "Ghost" aptly and fairly pointed out the skiing conditions as he commented on the technique used, which is very fair as the skiing conditions indeed dictated a balance between carved and steered turns over the changing surface (varied depths of frozen granular atop boiler plate ice). Grippy hero snow is easy for us all to carve deeply all the time, the key IMO is how we adapt our skiing to all conditions on all terrain.

I have actually been in my basement building a hotbox the past few days and have been called in to work as well. I was going to shoot up today, but I had to do test cycles with the hotbox and some yard work. I'll try to shoot up when the sun comes out again ;).

 

btw, some of don't need video to give us confidence in our skiing, and most of the time the "experts" are actually skiing around and not bothering with video. All that I have is some picture that other people take of me skiing, ie my avatar.

post #44 of 44

Rise: Glad you came up for air, and sorry to have missed you. The conditions were pretty good at Killington - and most importantly it was great to get in day 60. There will be good snow for a while there. Good luck with the hot box project.

 

Yeah the only reason I even had those short spliced video clips was that Trekchick specifically asked for me to post it on another thread about Kneebindings (which I've been using this year following my recent ACL recon), and that weekend I was skiing with my nephews who take their digital cameras pretty much everywhere - and when I asked them they snapped what they could on the steepest slope I could get them on. Least they could do for their uncle that takes them skiing...

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › volkl powerswitch/rossignol multix arms