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volkl powerswitch/rossignol multix arms

post #1 of 44
Thread Starter 

Hello.Can you tell the differance between differant "settings" with the powerswitch and multix arms?

I could probably word this better....

 

Thank you

post #2 of 44

I've been on Volkl power-switch skis and yes, you can feel a substantial change in rebound between the different modes.

 

On "Power" the ski has a lot of pop and on "Cruise" it is very damp.

 

The powerswitch does not effect the stiffness of the ski.

post #3 of 44
Thread Starter 

Is it useful or do you usualy keep it on one setting?

post #4 of 44

When I was demoing the Volkl Grizzlies, I would usually set them in the morning and wouldn't mess with them for the rest of the day.

 

On a hard-pack groomer day = Power

Powder day = Cruise

Bumps, day after = Dynamic

 

The switch does make a difference, but IMO I think it's way too gimmicky. There are better skis out there that don't have the power-switch... 

post #5 of 44

OOH YEAH the power switch on the Tigershark does make a big difference. Unfortunately it's the difference between mediocre (on) and dreadful (off). The Head iM82 was waaaay better in all conditions.

post #6 of 44

the im 82 is a totally different ski to the tigershark...youre comparing apples to pears

 

the power switch works and you can def feel a difference...the mutix arms...not so much

 

 

post #7 of 44
Thread Starter 

post #8 of 44

So what is the PowerSwitch Tigershark actually supposed to be for? I thought it was supposed to be an all mountain ski, like my Monsters and that was why the person I was skiing with wanted to swap skis with me (and the sole reason why I got to try the Tigersharks in the first place). I thought the purpose of the switch was to widen the range of conditions it could be used for (off for soft snow and on for hard snow). Who is this Volkl geared to suit? Maybe it's just not me...

post #9 of 44

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

So what is the PowerSwitch Tigershark actually supposed to be for? I thought it was supposed to be an all mountain ski, like my Monsters and that was why the person I was skiing with wanted to swap skis with me (and the sole reason why I got to try the Tigersharks in the first place). I thought the purpose of the switch was to widen the range of conditions it could be used for (off for soft snow and on for hard snow). Who is this Volkl geared to suit? Maybe it's just not me...


The switch changes the ski's attitude, not what it is capable of. A tigershark is a tigershark anyway you spin it. It can only do so much.

 

IMO the power-switch lets you be lazy when you want them to be, and aggressive when you want them to be.

post #10 of 44

The Mutix arms are just differeing stiffness.  Use the stiffer ones for longer turning, and others for a more pliable, shorter turning ski.  It does work, but it will not make the difference between a GS & SL ski.  They still have a basic turn radius regardless.

post #11 of 44
Thread Starter 

oh ok

post #12 of 44

So as I suggested the power switch does make a difference but the Tigershark was so rotten with the switch turned off I asked the owner (a high level expert like me, but he doesn't pay for skis) if he actually ever used those skis with the switch turned off. He quickly admitted that he thought the ski was pretty useless turned off just like I suggested, and other than the first day never used them that way again. Turned on they were ski-able, but still only a mediocre ski - no better than several other modern Volkls I've skied which to generalize were all pretty boring to me. Volkl clearly have a following though, so some people must like them - and the Tigershark powerswitch has got to appeal big time to the gizmo crowd...

post #13 of 44

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

So as I suggested the power switch does make a difference but the Tigershark was so rotten with the switch turned off I asked the owner (a high level expert like me, but he doesn't pay for skis) if he actually ever used those skis with the switch turned off. He quickly admitted that he thought the ski was pretty useless turned off just like I suggested, and other than the first day never used them that way again. Turned on they were ski-able, but still only a mediocre ski - no better than several other modern Volkls I've skied which to generalize were all pretty boring to me. Volkl clearly have a following though, so some people must like them - and the Tigershark powerswitch has got to appeal big time to the gizmo crowd...


Not really that gimmicky kid. Volkl has not marketed the ski the way you depict it. They presented the ski as a ski that can change its behavior via a switch, allowing for better performance/fufilling preference than a ski without a switch, not as a ski that magically gets better in powder from the flick of a switch, or a ski that can rip right through ice with the turn of a dial.

 

Now, I have a whole spew of skis, ranging from 216DH boards to 156SL skis to Volkl Bridges (well, not really mine, but I ski them alot). I also have the Tigershark 12ft in a 175 (non-switch), and have skied on the 12ft PS 175. Through my experiences over the past year with the non-switch ski, I have noticed that every now and then I wish that I had the switch version. There have been days where I really want to ski hard, and my non-switch ski won't be able to take it (which makes me take my GS skis out), and there are days where I wish the skis weren't so poppy (ie, crud, bumps). I love the skis alot, and find the sidecut perfect for the average New-England day, but I feel that the changes that the PS ski offers are well worth the extra $100 that the PS costs.

 

And I highly doubt a "rotten" ski has made the Ski Magazine's Ski Of The Year mark twice in a row. If Heads were really that much better then I think the panel of their expert testers would have noticed. That said, the Heads didn't even come close either year.

post #14 of 44

I don't think that magazines review are to be taken into much account when it comes to judge a ski...

I tend to rely more on what I read here and in other forums than to what is being written.

This said, I prefer stuff with less whistle and bells (that's why I bought the Tecnica XT17, no screws around to

adjust things...)

As for the PS, same thing applies, I haven't demoed nor skied a PS ski, and, while keeping my mind open, I doubt I'd cough up the money for one.

Speaking of which...Is there a non-PS version of the Grizzly? If "yes", how is it?

 

post #15 of 44

Those magazines do accept advertiser dollars, don't they? Accordingly, what they say is clearly influenced by their advertising dollar paying customers! Magazine reviews are what they are: a service to the advertisers.

 

There is also a chance that I might actually know how to ski (check my profile for a video link if you have doubts), have been doing it for a long time on a lot of boards, and have a valid opinion as to what works well with contemporary movement in all conditions on all terrain. IMO, the Monsters slaughtered the PS Tigersharks on all terrain, with all of the varied conditions available that day, and with the exact same tune as each other (1-2). To be sure, the owner of the PS Tigersharks didn't want to switch skis back, while I was dying to get mine back on. He and I are both high level experts and both found the off setting quite useless. Nice to hear that you like it - maybe it works well for you.

post #16 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

Those magazines do accept advertiser dollars, don't they? Accordingly, what they say is clearly influenced by their advertising dollar paying customers! Magazine reviews are what they are: a service to the advertisers.

 

There is also a chance that I might actually know how to ski (check my profile for a video link if you have doubts), have been doing it for a long time on a lot of boards, and have a valid opinion as to what works well with contemporary movement in all conditions on all terrain. IMO, the Monsters slaughtered the PS Tigersharks on all terrain, with all of the varied conditions available that day, and with the exact same tune as each other (1-2). To be sure, the owner of the PS Tigersharks didn't want to switch skis back, while I was dying to get mine back on. He and I are both high level experts and both found the off setting quite useless. Nice to hear that you like it - maybe it works well for you.

 

Pulling personal blows now? Pretty low. We should ski sometime next year, actually... up for Killington sometime soon?

 

It could be that the ski is too much of a ski for you, seeing that you run 161s as a daily use ski (and you are bigger than me). Not to sound like a dick or anything, but I feel like I am going to die freeskiing on my slalom race skis (which are 165s), and not from the stiffness, but from the length. The Tigersharks tend to perform better lengths too, so it may just be that you and your friend can't handle the ski, or they are too short to actually perform.

post #17 of 44

If you do not need a ski to be more flexible with the same side cut, to be able to decamber into a sharp turn on hardpack at a much lower speed for example, or to ski tight turns in soft snow, or if you cannot appreciate how a ski with a different longitudinal flex but the same sidecut can be useful, then you don't want a power switch.

 

I could see the power switch being useful if you vary your runs.  You might ski slowly with your children or friends one run, and meet them at the bottom via a different route the next run.  You could blast a black diamond one run and ski tight slow circles around trees off the groomed on the next run.  That would be better with a ski that had a switch.

 

I can't see fiddling with the Rossi arms.  I'd just go change up skis before doing that.

 

That being said I have no idea how "high performance" the on position is or how soft the off position is.  It sounds like it does make the ski soft enough for the slow-motion stuff, but I have yet to try it. However, having skied both the RX8 and WC SC from Fischer, I can appreciate how it would be nice to turn a switch that changed your ski from one to the other.  I would gladly turn that switch off when I wanted to ski slowly with the kids.  As it is I would sooner cope with the WC at slow speeds than change out to a softer ski.

 

It does have a useful function, and I see value there.  The trouble is longitudinal flex is only one thing.  It won't give you a longer ski with a bigger sidecut radius, which is what you really need for blasting a black run.  It's not a panacea, but it has it's place.

post #18 of 44

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

If you do not need a ski to be more flexible with the same side cut, to be able to decamber into a sharp turn on hardpack at a much lower speed for example, or to ski tight turns in soft snow, or if you cannot appreciate how a ski with a different longitudinal flex but the same sidecut can be useful, then you don't want a power switch.

 

You obviously haven't been on a Powerswitch ski (or read this thread from the beginning).

 

The Powersitch DOES NOT change the stiffness or flex patterns of the ski. It DOES changes the ski's rebound and damping

 

Rebound is not a function of Stiffness and vise-versa. 

 

Which brings us back to the conversation, what is the point of the Powerswitch? 

post #19 of 44

I have hand flexed them in the store.  They are stiffer with the switch on.  It takes more force to bend them into a curve.

post #20 of 44

The powerswitch effectively adds axial stiffness to the ski, which is what affects the rebound.  It doesn't add direct longitudinal stiffness, but the indirect effect of the axial stiffness changes the longitudinal stiffness.  It would be like tightening axial fibers in a beam to make them stronger; if the fibers are spaced away from the central bending plane of the beam, they end up making the beam stiffer under traditional bending loads.  So I would say it affects both stiffness and rebound of the ski.  You can definitely feel it when skiing them and hand flexing them.

 

Being a pure spring system, powerswitch cannot really affect the damping.  There is nothing in the powerswitch mechanism that would affect damping of the ski other than friction of the carbon rod in its tube, and I don't think they designed it for that.

post #21 of 44

Rise: Nothing personal intended - as I said earlier I have never been excited with any modern Volkl I've skied - but that's not to say that you or others don't like them or the power switch feature. My point is that both the owner and I found zero utility in the switch's off position (trust me, we're both highly capable). Those skis were not much longer than my 161cm Monsters, but then I normally ski 165-170cm skis - excepting my Monsters (which are my first ski that short) so they really seemed a reasonable length. I didn't take note of their exact length as I frankly had no interest in continuing on them any longer than was necessary that day.

 

WRT Killington, thanks for the offer I'm here now and will be when/if you come over. On the slopes I'll look like my profile picture/avatar and ski like the video link: Tan helmet and pants with navy parka, Black Nordica boots on Blue Dynastar Legends in 165cm for soft spring snow (hopefully) with white Kneebindings. Please do introduce yourself or yell out my name CHRIS when you see me, and we'll connect. I would be happy to ski a bit together. I will probably be in a small group, but you would be welcome to join in. PM me if you can't find me and want to swap cell #s or want to let me know your name, parka color, etc.

post #22 of 44

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

..... I asked the owner (a high level expert like me, but he doesn't pay for skis)....

 

....There is also a chance that I might actually know how to ski (check my profile for a video link if you have doubts), have been doing it for a long time on a lot of boards, and have a valid opinion as to what works well with contemporary movement in all conditions on all terrain.....

Sorry to rain on your parade here Chris, but neither your avatar nor video you obviously willingly posted under your name projects the expertise you are talking about. Or maybe it is just me   What I see is a lot of skidding. And as far as I know and as far as MY expertise tells me, skidders prefer stiffer skis. They just do not have skill to deal with the softer ones. But what do I know....

 

No, wait! I am expertier expert then you! I am, I am, I am....

 

PS. I do not own Tigersharks, did not ski them and have no affiliation with Volkl except I have a hat with their logo.

post #23 of 44

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by axebiker View Post

The Mutix arms are just differeing stiffness.  Use the stiffer ones for longer turning, and others for a more pliable, shorter turning ski.  It does work, but it will not make the difference between a GS & SL ski.  They still have a basic turn radius regardless.

 

Yes!  The ski has the same sidecut radius.  If you have the switch on or the long arms on then it takes more force to bend the ski, force that is easier to come by if you are skiing faster in that turn (more centrifugal force more momentum to change more acceleration required).

 

Of course, if you are not skiing in a pure arc to pure arc fashion, it ain't gonna matter; turning the switch off will just make the ski floppier.  Looking at the video CHRISfromRI posted, it seems he is using more of a steered turn.  His Heads would be much better in those conditions for those turns; the volkls would just seem too light and inconsequential with the switch on and light and weak with the switch off.  


Edited by Ghost - 4/18/2009 at 12:12 am GMT to --> too


Edited by Ghost - 4/20/2009 at 11:07 am GMT
post #24 of 44

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cfr View Post

 

Sorry to rain on your parade here Chris, but neither your avatar nor video you obviously willingly posted under your name projects the expertise you are talking about.


x2
 

post #25 of 44

I'm guessing all the skiers who test skis for Ski Magazine are "top level experts" and almost all of the skiers who post here are not. I'd believe a magazine before a random recreational skier posting on the internet. I know you guys enjoy reading each other's impressions of different skis, but let's keep it real, folks.

post #26 of 44

if you haven't skied the PS don't make a point, since you don't have it

no grizzly don't come without it

btw; PS i would describe as stabilizing the skis including higher speed, and IMO do stiffen the skis

don't care what is said, this is based on my personal opinion.

my wife likes her grizzly; all she does east is to pop on power and they go thru ice like gs (close to anyway)

post #27 of 44

off topic

 

it is IMPRESSIVE how many EXPERTS are in any given ski-related-forum

 

WHY DON'T I SEE THEM IN MILIONS ON THE SLOPES?????????????????????????

post #28 of 44

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kubagr View Post

off topic

 

it is IMPRESSIVE how many EXPERTS are in any given ski-related-forum

 

WHY DON'T I SEE THEM IN MILIONS ON THE SLOPES?????????????????????????

You don't see them because this is what a self-described "top level expert" uses as evidence of his ability on some NH groomers - http://www.youtube.com/p/10DA698CA4892B7E.

 

Imagine that skill on real hills with real snow and real terrain .
 

post #29 of 44

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cfr View Post

 

Sorry to rain on your parade here Chris, but neither your avatar nor video you obviously willingly posted under your name projects the expertise you are talking about. Or maybe it is just me   What I see is a lot of skidding. And as far as I know and as far as MY expertise tells me, skidders prefer stiffer skis. They just do not have skill to deal with the softer ones. But what do I know....

 

No, wait! I am expertier expert then you! I am, I am, I am....

 

PS. I do not own Tigersharks, did not ski them and have no affiliation with Volkl except I have a hat with their logo.


x3, saw a lot of skiding, an average level 7ish skier at best. By the way, most "high level experts" don't tend to feel the need to proclaim it.

 

post #30 of 44

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post

 

You don't see them because this is what a self-described "top level expert" uses as evidence of his ability on some NH groomers - http://www.youtube.com/p/10DA698CA4892B7E.

 

Imagine that skill on real hills with real snow and real terrain .
 


that's  what I think is the reason. it is very easy to create an "expert" surfing web and youtube.... what's more: it is very easy to believe, the virtual imagination becomes a real perception of  his/her ability to ski everything..
 

but.......reality bites..........especially , like you said, on real terrain and real snow.....

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