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How good is my shot at...

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 

Well, if some of you can recall from a year ago me posting about dedicating to SL only, etc, you may remember how horrid I was at GS. Well, this season was the somewhat similar (300+ point finishes in December and January without falls, and not a single SL finish in the time period from December to February; and yes I was trying), and n. I took a technical break halfway through January, jumped into DH for my first speed event, then did a handful of SGs to top it off. In mid February I jumped back to slalom, and had an extremely difficult time, even after doing weeks of training with my HS team and CSC/UNH at the local hill. I finally snagged a finish at Cochran's, but even that was dissapointing.

 

Anyway, a few weeks ago I decided to trek up to SR for a GS race with a few friends (I had vouchers plus my Snocountry dual season pass). I didn't really have high expectations going into the race, and was sleep and food deprived (2hrs of sleep, followed by a 2 and a half hour drive). In the first run I found myself out of the track, not once, but twice. When I skiied down to the scoreboard to see if 2nd run was even worth my time, I found myself only 8 seconds out, which to me, isn't all that bad, coming from 300pt+ races. So, I showed up second run and fell out of the track again. I didn't even bother checking the board this time, and I went off skiing the mountain with my friends. When I went to grab a result sheet and return my bib, I looked at the sheet and found myself with 180 points. At first I was confused, and though to myself "Man, how did they fuck this one up?...". After doing the math, I found that it was right, and that I was indeed sitting at 180 points in a discipline that I was 300+ in a day before. I didn't think much of it, and said to myself "I just got lucky".

 

A week later, one of my dipshit friends dropped a sledge hammer on my GS skis, doing serious damage to the edges. With all of my other GS skis unmounted and in the shop, I was almost sure that my GS season was over, and I wouldn't be able to see if the 180pt race was a fluke.

 

Yesterday was my friend's birthday, and he is a snowboarder/skiier (hasn't skiied in years, but is somehow better at skiing now than most people I have seen). He has always wanted to go to the Loaf, so we decided to go up for the weekend since my season's pass was still good. I looked online and saw that there was a SS race scheduled that weekend, and figured "why not?". Friday came, and I looked at the forecast and the forecast told me mother nature was going to be a bitch Saturday (and I was told it was very true up there). I decided to skip out on the the Loaf then and there. Saturday night came and I got a phone call from my friend at 11pm. He kept saying over and over how nice it was supposed to be tomorrow, etc etc. Stupidly I gave in, and 4 hours later (1 1/2 of sleep somewhere in there) I found myself driving for 5 hours to Sugarloaf. After many stops, we got there at 8:45, just before registration closed. I really wasn't in the mood for racing, but my friends insisted and paid my entry since I drove them up there and gave them tickets for the day. By the time we got all of our gear on the course had closed, and they were halfway through the girls. Wasn't lookin good for me. We skiied down to the lift and saw a Volkl rep setting up his bench. My friend ended up demo'ing a pair of Bridges for the day. I didn't want to wreck my already damaged GS ski with all of the slush and rocks, so I kicked my friend off of his demo's and took them out for a few crud busting runs.

 

I decided to run down to the start after a few runs to see if I was up yet, and when I looked down they were on bib # xx, and i was bib xx+2. Slightly breathed from cruising down NG with the Bridges, I jumped out of my cloths and into my battered GS skis. I felt a breeze down below, and though "Oh great..."... my suit had ripped during my freeskiing runs from the bottom of the zipper all the way down to my... you know, and I was only wearing boxers underneath (I am pretty poor and can't really afford all of the nice thermal layers that some of you guys have). I slid down to the start line while EVERYONE (even the officials) laughing at me. I shrugged and laughed with them, and then took my blind, inspectionless run. I got pretty late, and was out of the track for a good 10 gates. I eventually got back in, but lost serious speed that was supposed to carry me through the flats. I went to return my bib, knowing that I was going to be far off the mark from my poor skiing, but the 1st run results were out, and I was 8.5 out... so I decided to give 2nd run a shot.

 

After much crud busting on Sluice and Gondala Line and a half of a ham sandwich with water, I went back to the start and did my run. I got late once, and held a tuck through most of the gates. I came out of my tuck right before Peavey crossing, which cost me some serious speed before going onto the flats. I called it a day after, as the snow was really getting wet and I realized that I had a long drive ahead. I went to the CC to return my bib again and pick up my t-shirt, and went to see the results, but by the time I go there all of the sheets were gone. I went upstairs to grab a t-shirt, and out of curiousity asked if I could get a result sheet. After waiting a few minutes, I got a copy. I looked at it, did some quick adding, and then took another look. I finished in the 130s... . There was no way that this was right... yet it was. A 170 point drop in 2 weeks with no GS training or coaching all year? A 130pt finish with 90 minutes of sleep, broken skis, and a 5 hour drive? Was I still dreaming from the night before? I slapped myself in the face. Nope, still awake....

 

Anyway, I am going to UNH next year, and a few weeks ago I didn't even consider thinking about their team. My brother (non-skiier) and my highschool coach both told me to give their coach a call to see if I could do something next year (training-wise). My question is, should I even bother asking/calling about training with them next year? I have never had coaching of any sort (well, unless you consider broad coaching for a highschool team coaching) due to my financial situation. I'm wondering though how much good coaching would acutally impact me as a skiier... esp coaching from an NCAA coach. Would it be worth my time to call, or would it be a waste of my time?

 

Thanks,

 

RTTT

post #2 of 31

It would be tremendously difficult to make an NCAA ski team with 130 points.  My daughter looked into this stuff after many years of racing and they are looking pretty much at no one who is not below 100 points going into college and they are really looking for even lower point profiles than that. 

 

I'd suggest going to the ski team site and looking at their rosters, writing down the names.  Then go to the USSA web site and look up the points profiles of the kids on the team.  Then you'll have a much better idea of your chances.  But the region UNH is in has some really really hot racers.

post #3 of 31
Thread Starter 

I really don't want to be racing for them next year, I just want to get some formal training in to see where I get. UNH has a handful of sub-20 point racers... so I know I'm not going to be racing for them.

post #4 of 31

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rise To The Top View Post

 

I really don't want to be racing for them next year, I just want to get some formal training in to see where I get. UNH has a handful of sub-20 point racers... so I know I'm not going to be racing for them.

 

Okay, then your best shot would be to talk to the coaches at surrounding ski resorts.  Some may not focus on racers your age, but some might.  Give them a call...soon...before they go off to other jobs for the summer.

 

Also, it gets increasingly difficult to lower your points.  Like exponentially....  The drop from 300 to 180 is sort of typical.  The next drop was less typical.  But, sometimes the reason you do well is some guy with low points is either intensionally running a slow race to give points to younger racers (I've actually SEEN it) or just had a bad day.  The next thing you know, the finishes are skewing the race points, because racers are finishing closer to the top guys.  That's why it takes the lowest TWO races to bring down your points. 


Edited by sibhusky - 4/7/2009 at 01:59 am
post #5 of 31
Thread Starter 

This was also only my 2nd year racing... and I skiied like a gorrilla 3 years ago, lol.

post #6 of 31

Just to give you a feel for what happened to her:

 

POINTS INFORMATION FOR SEASON 2002 - 2003

  DH Points SL Points GS Points SG Points SC Points
 Fall 2002-2003 Points (Rank) 990.0    990.0    990.0    990.0    990.0   
 2003 USSA List 7 (Rank) 990.0    276.41   (1613) 251.06   (1508) 990.0    990.0   

POINTS INFORMATION FOR SEASON 2003 - 2004

  DH Points SL Points GS Points SG Points SC Points
 Fall 2003-2004 Points (Rank) 990.0    283.51   (1192) 257.16   (1130) 990.0    990.0   

POINTS INFORMATION FOR SEASON 2004 - 2005

  DH Points SL Points GS Points SG Points SC Points
 Fall 2004-2005 Points (Rank) 990.0    191.81   (978) 155.34   (741) 244.62   (587) 990.0   
 2005 USSA List 8 (Rank) 990.0    148.79   (981) 128.78   (803) 222.88   (702) 990.0   

 POINTS INFORMATION FOR SEASON 2005 - 2006

  DH Points SL Points GS Points SG Points SC Points
 Fall 2005-2006 Points (Rank) 990.0    153.49   (787) 133.48   (671) 227.78   (593) 990.0   
 2006 USSA List 8 (Rank) 990.0    137.91   (876) 119.12   (691) 267.78   (924) 990.0   

At this point she started college and decided that she wouldn't have time to race.  But you can see that the big jumps were early and after that the improvements tapered off.  Her FIS points showed similar slowdowns.  It's just tougher and tougher to shave off time as you get closer to the top athletes. 

 

As for getting some of the coach's time to train with him?  I sort of doubt it, because he is supposedly focussing on his team and you'd be taking time away from them.  You never know, though.  I truly think your best bet is to try and enroll with a mountain team local to the school.  You're more likely to get IN the races, too.  A lot of times college teams will only enter SOME of their racers due to budget constraints.  


Edited by sibhusky - 4/7/2009 at 02:03 am
post #7 of 31
Thread Starter 

The top guys at the race yesterday were pretty serious about their times (I overheard a conversation in the lodge, one of the top kids from Colby was saying: Is a J2 really that close to us?, and then again at the top of the second run: Are you going all out this run? - Yea, that 2 is right behind me...). I know about ppl throwing points... I've been to races where it happens, but I usually suck badly and never get to take good points home.

post #8 of 31

RTTT,,, that's a super result.  Well Done.  Coaching and training time will take you even lower.  Call the coach at the college and see what opportunities are available for you, either at the school, or in the area.  He will know, and can guide you.   

post #9 of 31

What have you been doing with your summers?  Aside from perhaps a one week camp, are you doing any other activity?

post #10 of 31

First off, congrats on your improvements. I would echo the others in saying the next jump is not going to be easy.

 

Two things-

 

1. If I am said coach and read this my initial reaction is "NO WAY" based on the fact that

in my opinion you are not really trying. How about some discipline- getting some sleep, being on time

and being prepared? Enough with the excuses...Maybe it's the 40+ year old in me, but I'm shaking my head asking myself why as a coach I'd want to help you.......

 

2. Approach this from the other side- How can YOU help the coach? Do they need someone to carry gates or assist otherwise? This may afford you the chance to jump in and train when said "work" is done. It's perception- not what you are taking, but what you can give to the program. Maybe you won't race for them- but having another set of hands always makes the work easier and as your "pay" you will be able to jump in and train (with coach feedback) whenever possible.

 

Best of luck!

 

 

post #11 of 31

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SJB View Post

 

First off, congrats on your improvements. I would echo the others in saying the next jump is not going to be easy.

 

Two things-

 

1. If I am said coach and read this my initial reaction is "NO WAY" based on the fact that

in my opinion you are not really trying. How about some discipline- getting some sleep, being on time

and being prepared? Enough with the excuses...Maybe it's the 40+ year old in me, but I'm shaking my head asking myself why as a coach I'd want to help you.......

 

 

I would argue that performance on race day (in the aspect of skiing to ones full potential achieved in training) is 100% psychological. It is highly possible that in taking the races seriously before, he was putting way too much pressure on himself. Taking a more relaxed approach led to better results.

 

Now that he has found his state of mind that allows him to succeed, he needs to figure out how to attain that state of mind while in a physical state that allows for optimal performance.

 

Great job on finding your game!

post #12 of 31

Hey man, congrats on your results. I wish I could say my end-of-season was a plus, too.

 

Don't forget to factor in the penalty, finish sheets usually just show race points, but at the MARA SS, the penalty was probably pretty low with Bates/Colby athletes in the field.

 

A couple years ago, I found myself in a similar situation - I would be attending a college with a phenomenal ski team, and I was not up to their standard - I still loved ski racing and wanted to continue, but the varsity standard was simply too good. PM me with questions on how I made it work for me, if you want.

 

As far as next year, the varsity coaches at UNH, a veritable alpine powerhouse in the east, will likely be supportive of your cause, and even offer alternatives, but will almost certainly not let you train with them because of NCAA regulations (you need to be an NCAA athlete to be in an NCAA practice).

 

However, the coaches will be a great resource in terms of trying to find you other sources of training. You can start a club team (if one doesn't already exist) and see if there are any coaches around willing to donate time to helping out with setting, getting hill space, etc. You should look into the local hills around UNH and see if you want to join their race programs - this could be a touch expensive but by looking at your race entries over the last year .... you could perhaps benefit by spending the money on good training and fewer, more focused, race starts.

 

Anyway - youre not going to ski with the UNH varsity team - frankly, there is no reason for them to let you do so - you don't have a FIS profile, and you really show no signs of being even close to carnival-quality, so they're not going to give you an NCAA slot and practice spot. That being said, there are many other ways to get adequate training and race starts. Look into them, and start now. That way, you can focus on dryland in the fall, staying atop your studies, and fine-tuning plans for the winter, before heading full-bore into your winter break when you can ski a lot and get the wheels turning and your skis running fast for the winter.

 

Anyway, PM me if you have any questions. Good luck. I'm sure I'll see you at races next year too, especially if you stick to the NH/VT series.

post #13 of 31

Congratulations on the progress. Nice. And congratulations on UNH. Great school.

 

You've got an accurate read on the ski team. One of the top men's alpine programs in the country this past year. Loaded with talent. Three freshman this past year, I think. All 21-22 . That means they have skied full time for at least a couple of years after leaving the ski academy world. There's a guy on the team with about 35 FIS {not USSA} points in both events who has yet to ski in a carnival. So, yep, they're in a very different place than you are.  I know a number of very solid ski racers {sub 50 FIS points} who are at UNH, and unable to make the team {or train with them}. Eastern NCAA skiing is some of the most competitive skiing in the country.  These are guys who have put tremendous energy into this for years. On average they have been skiing all of their lives, racing since age 6-7. and at a minimum on snow full time in the winter {and often year round} since they were 13-14 {or younger}. Almost all of the men take a year or two off to ski full time before college. A number of them come from National team systems, or close to them. They have had some of the best coaching in the world. I think that you know all of this. Even these guys who have been close to making the team and falling short have that type of background.

 

The unfortunate reality is that the NCAA teams almost always need to make cuts for a variety of reasons. You can only load so many athletes into a van, for example. Training comes in small amounts of time, and needs to be focused and productive. Small numbers help that. You'll see that most college rosters have a maximum of 10 of each gender. And at almost all of those schools there are athletes who would be very happy to have an opportunity to train, and then ski in USSA races. The programs normally can't handle it, which is unfortunate. There are other issues. The turn shape, ruts and shelf formed by those guys is going to be entirely different than what you are able to ski at this point and the training could be tough. The sets that these guys race are unlike what you have seen. The training would frustrate you, and others to be honest. You're just not going to fit, in terms of your skiing, with the team. You know that. So I think the ski team is a non-starter....with one possible exception.

 

Some of the teams can accommodate student managers and volunteers. I have no idea what the scope of the "work" might be. At UNH they likely have a full time assistant coach. It might be worth inquiring with the coach if you could volunteer to help, as others have suggested. Perhaps there's a student manager role? There may be a way to be a big help, and you obviously love the sport. You may be able to work that into being allowed to take some training runs, every now and then, and if you've been a good guy and helpful, I would think that all involved would be OK.

 

You might also find that UNH has a ski club, and even a USCSA team as a component to that. If they do not have a USCSA team, you might consider seeing if there's interest to form one. It wouldn't take much to get one going. That way you'd have some friends to race with, and you'd likely have a blast. That racing is  a lot of fun.

 

Where I think you'll have challenges is in the coaching. You might get lucky in the USCSA team thing, and find a very good skier or two who don't want to continue at the NCAA level {or never have} and might be able to in effect do some coaching while they ski. A long shot, but a maybe. Otherwise, you may look at the NH programs, and see if you could train with them. Obviously, you'll need to work out a financial arrangement. Coaching comes with a price tag, as you know. Some programs have "PG" programs, but they tend to be pretty intense, full time on snow, etc. Not what you're looking for.  Some have masters' programs with coaches and that might be a good fit. Perhaps you can get a jump on a master's career!

 

You love the sport and you'll find something, for sure. A USCSA team might be a great experience in a lot of ways. Good luck, and keep having fun.

 

 

post #14 of 31

I think that IN GENERAL, colleges with NCAA teams do not have (even as a club) a USCSA team.  I believe there are one or two exceptions, Montana State being one of them, but what happens is USCSA will not allow those clubs to compete in their championships due to political reasons.  IE, they are apparently afraid that the USCSA skiers are "the second string" and don't want to accept second string contenders or something like that in their championships.  (That's what I get out of it at least, reading comments about it.)

 

So, back to my recommendation that you look for a local resort team and contact their coach. 

post #15 of 31

In New England, I am aware of 2-3 colleges with NCAA D1 programs, as well as USCSA teams. I know kids who are skiing on USCSA clubs at CU, and Denver. I've heard that more are forming USCSA groups, as they have students who would like to keep racing, but just can't come close to an NCAA team. I do recall the issue of not being able to compete at Nationals, and maybe the regional championships...which seems kind of petty. One of my friends has sons in both types of USCSA programs, and he explained that the one at the school with an NCAA team was shut out. These are student run clubs, with minimal funding on the part of the schools. Completely walled off from the athletic department and the NCAA program. No coaching. The kids have fun. I've recently seen some of the Bates USCSA team competing in USSA races. Maybe the USCSA will loosen up a bit on the championships thing. With all due respect the USCSA shouldn't be offended by the situation. It would be good for the USCSA and NCAA to coexist as much as possible. Seems to work in the East. Thought it might be an option for UNH, but maybe too much conflict.

 

Joining a local area weekend group, as a college freshman {even as a J1} isn't that easy in New England, IMO. Will take some searching.

 

post #16 of 31


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Muleski View Post

 

 

Joining a local area weekend group, as a college freshman {even as a J1} isn't that easy in New England, IMO. Will take some searching.

 


 

Is this because they're geared to the younger skiers or some other issue?  I know our club used to have quite a few older skiers, but with the departure of the coach we had at the time, it seemed like the older skiers either joined college teams, went to other teams, or stopped racing.  The current team is much younger.  I don't know if they would take a college kid or not, but they used to.

 

Or is the issue that you think that a college kid couldn't train midweek?  I think that if he scheduled his courses right, he could do the midweek training.

post #17 of 31
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post

 

What have you been doing with your summers?  Aside from perhaps a one week camp, are you doing any other activity?

 

I went to a camp a few years back and didn't get much out of it... normally I just hang out and do some work here and there. I really want to go to a camp this summer, but I can't afford it, let alone the race fees or skis. Last time I was at camp most of the bill was covered by Pepsi. If it weren't for that I wouldn't have gone out there.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SJB View Post

 

First off, congrats on your improvements. I would echo the others in saying the next jump is not going to be easy.

 

Two things-

 

1. If I am said coach and read this my initial reaction is "NO WAY" based on the fact that

in my opinion you are not really trying. How about some discipline- getting some sleep, being on time

and being prepared? Enough with the excuses...Maybe it's the 40+ year old in me, but I'm shaking my head asking myself why as a coach I'd want to help you.......

 

2. Approach this from the other side- How can YOU help the coach? Do they need someone to carry gates or assist otherwise? This may afford you the chance to jump in and train when said "work" is done. It's perception- not what you are taking, but what you can give to the program. Maybe you won't race for them- but having another set of hands always makes the work easier and as your "pay" you will be able to jump in and train (with coach feedback) whenever possible.

 

Best of luck!

 

 

 

Well, I have actually pushed myself during races, and this year it hasn't really worked out too well for a variety of reasons. I plan on going out to Durham sometime later this week and I was planning on asking if I could manage if all else failed.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Muleski View Post

 

Congratulations on the progress. Nice. And congratulations on UNH. Great school.

 

....

 

You might also find that UNH has a ski club, and even a USCSA team as a component to that. If they do not have a USCSA team, you might consider seeing if there's interest to form one. It wouldn't take much to get one going. That way you'd have some friends to race with, and you'd likely have a blast. That racing is  a lot of fun. 

 

 

Thanks, was fairly easy to get in there with my brother being there for 2 years already and being a "minority". My one big dellema is that I also got into CU Boulder, but I really can't go out there til my sophomore year for finanical reasons. As you know, they have both a USCSA and NCAA team, both of which are solid. For next year I just want to drop my GS points so I can make it to speed week. I think I heard from someone that they take 80pts or less, which to me shoudn't be all that difficult (4-7 seconds off of two runs seems possible to me).

 

Then comes the issue of starting a USCSA team at UNH. I do know several racers with sub 100 points that are there already, but the problem is that UNH isn't really close to anything.

post #18 of 31
Quote:

Is this because they're geared to the younger skiers or some other issue?  I know our club used to have quite a few older skiers, but with the departure of the coach we had at the time, it seemed like the older skiers either joined college teams, went to other teams, or stopped racing.  The current team is much younger.  I don't know if they would take a college kid or not, but they used to.

 

Or is the issue that you think that a college kid couldn't train midweek?  I think that if he scheduled his courses right, he could do the midweek training.

 

I think it happens all over, but there's a lot of drop out at the J2 level. My home mountain has one of the biggest J3-6 programs in the country. The number of weekend J1-2's could be counted on about 5 fingers. The older kids, if they stick with it, tend to enroll in the local ski academy. They train mid-week, mid-day. There's a lot of this throughout New England. We still have a fair amount of high school racing, and some of those kids train on weeknds at various programs, but we have a lot who drop out of the USSA ranks entirely. If you aspire to race FIS, and be competitive, you're at an academy or in one of the very rare local programs that enable kids to ski mid week with very good coaching and time off for mid week FIS races.  It's not as simple as assuming that every mountain with a race program can handle this age group. it's too bad, but it's a lot harder these days.

 

College kids tend to arrange their schedules so that they can squeeze in training. Not an issue. Many have no afternoon classes, and none on Friday. Most train 2-3 days mid week {normally in the afternoon}, then leave on Thursday to race on Friday and Saturday. I don't think the class schedule is the problem, though if you're pre-med, maybe it's one day of training a week. It's finding a venue to train mid week, and the coaching. And doing so at a reasonable price. You're not going to be welcomed where there's an academy training mid-week, and I'm not sure of the real options. UNH isn't located near spots where there might be some other adult training options...masters, beer leagues, etc. You're about an hour and a half to North Conway. UNH trains at Attitash. That's why I thought about the USCSA route. That may be tough, too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #19 of 31

RTT,

 

UC Boulder has a big USCSA group. We have a couple of family friends skiing in it, and having fun. I don't think there's any coaching. It's not cheap as they travel to race quite a ways. But it's fun. I completely understand the economics of the college decision. UNH is a very good value, particulary in-state. 

 

CU's NCAA team is more than solid. #2 in the country, the men had the top SL results as I recall at this year's NCAA's. Their three skiers were two ex USST skiers, and a former French National team member. That's what you're looking at. Wow.

 

I'm interested in the comment about dropping your GS points so that you can make it to speed week. I wasn't aware that anybody had a minimum GS point level for speed entry, but I am aware of much more concern with respect to race safety....particularly in speed races. I can understand if the organizers want to make sure that skiers are skilled enough to be safe. Dropping to an 80 point profile is a big, big leap, so if that's your goal, go for it.

 

Good luck. You'll figure something out. Even if you could get lined up with some NASTAR racing and training {maybe at Gunstock?} it would probably be fun, and good for your skiing. As long as you're improving your turns, conditioning, strength and tactics, your racing will improve, too. That training would help you in your USSA racing.

 

 

post #20 of 31

Definitely the USCSA thing is a possibility for you. Get in contact with the Eastern office ASAP (if UNH doens't already have a team ... I don't think they do) about forming a team, they're super nice and accommodating. There are several NCAA schools that have club USCSA teams in the east, Bates, Colby, Dartmouth and St Lawrence come to mind (I go to one of these schools). USCSA races are USSA sanctioned, so you can get points out of it, and are pretty laid back and a lot of fun, which, based on your story posted above, might cater to you skiing at your best.

 

As has been mentioned, the difficulty will be coaching/training. If you're lucky, the NCAA team will have some sort of idea of how to help you or people in your situation, especially if you get in contact with them now, rather than in the fall when they're getting ready for their season. Talk to other potential skiers and see if they can get a jump on starting something on campus.

 

Best of luck to you.

post #21 of 31

Interesting. Dartmouth has always carried a very large team, with in effect a "B" team, that largely competes in FIS and USSA races. They have 16 men on their alpine squad, all very good. Didn't realize that the had any USCSA skiing going on. Also didn't realize that Colby did. I do know that I see a lot of Colby skiers in USSA and FIS races that I haven't seen on their roster {website}, so maybe that's not up to date. I know the guy who started the B team/USCSA skiing at Bates a few years ago, and have heard that SLU had some people skiing USCSA {and killing it} this season. I get confused with the various USCSA divisions, too. I'd personally like to see all of the Eastern EISA NCAA D1 schools adopt USCSA skiing for those who won't be able to ski in the NCAA ranks. It would be great. 8-10 guys among 1500 or more students is a small number.  I'm a big believer that we need to do all we can to encourage participation at all levels and ages...not make it more difficult.

post #22 of 31

I love New England, but never moved back after heading west. I'd say go to Boulder, and join or form a Teamski team.  Teamski is (or was when I was in it) a really well run, fun circuit with courses a bit more challenging than Nastar.  I raced in them after college and had a ball.

 

http://www.teamski.com/

 

If you stay in New Hampshire, look at some of the local leagues, like the Wachusett evening races:

 

http://www.wachusett.com/default.aspx?tabid=133

post #23 of 31

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Muleski View Post

RTT,

 

UC Boulder has a big USCSA group. We have a couple of family friends skiing in it, and having fun. I don't think there's any coaching. It's not cheap as they travel to race quite a ways. But it's fun. I completely understand the economics of the college decision. UNH is a very good value, particulary in-state. 

 

CU's NCAA team is more than solid. #2 in the country, the men had the top SL results as I recall at this year's NCAA's. Their three skiers were two ex USST skiers, and a former French National team member. That's what you're looking at. Wow.

 

I'm interested in the comment about dropping your GS points so that you can make it to speed week. I wasn't aware that anybody had a minimum GS point level for speed entry, but I am aware of much more concern with respect to race safety....particularly in speed races. I can understand if the organizers want to make sure that skiers are skilled enough to be safe. Dropping to an 80 point profile is a big, big leap, so if that's your goal, go for it.

 

Good luck. You'll figure something out. Even if you could get lined up with some NASTAR racing and training {maybe at Gunstock?} it would probably be fun, and good for your skiing. As long as you're improving your turns, conditioning, strength and tactics, your racing will improve, too. That training would help you in your USSA racing.

 

 


CU Boulder definitely has coaching, and it's good...Paul Roszypal and his assistants Curt and Brandon.  Our Masters team trains with them all the time...
 

 

post #24 of 31
Quote:

CU Boulder definitely has coaching, and it's good...Paul Roszypal and his assistants Curt and Brandon.  Our Masters team trains with them all the time...
 

I was curious, so I shot an email to one of our friends last night. Funded by the school, and the athletes. They pay about $1K in a program fee {very reasonable}. Something like 80-90 racers on the team. It's a real team, not so much of a "club". Wide range of experience, too. 50 pt. FIS skiers to relatively inexperienced. Lots of fun. Sounds like a GREAT program. Guess there's a lot of info on the CU, Boulder website.

post #25 of 31

The OP has already made the decision to go to UNH, as I understand it.

post #26 of 31

 

Quote:

The OP has already made the decision to go to UNH, as I understand it.

 

Quote:
 

Thanks, was fairly easy to get in there with my brother being there for 2 years already and being a "minority". My one big dellema is that I also got into CU Boulder, but I really can't go out there til my sophomore year for finanical reasons. As you know, they have both a USCSA and NCAA team, both of which are solid.

  

 

I think this statement by RTT opened up the CU discussion, as well as the discussion about USCSA teams/clubs at schools that had NCAA D1 programs....in case he wanted to investigate or possibly try to start one at UNH. I'm not trying to convince him against UNH, at all. Trying to help him figure out how/where to continue with some level of ski racing, and ideally get some coaching.

post #27 of 31

My point about summer is simple.  Fine something to do and it doesn't have to be skiing.

 

Judo .... karate (very balance oriented) ... and train like five times a week.

 

My kid refused to do anything during the summer except for a week at Hood and a long week at Tux and you could see him playing catch up the first part of each season.

 

Stay very, very active.  You mention getting points down and see an improvement at the end and IMHO, there is a connection.

post #28 of 31

Your enthusiasm is commendable.

 

Your grip on reality is tenuous. 

 

You are a product of the everyone gets a trophy ethos.

 

Find a club team, and - when you grow up  -  a beer league.

post #29 of 31
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki View Post

My point about summer is simple.  Fine something to do and it doesn't have to be skiing.

 

Judo .... karate (very balance oriented) ... and train like five times a week.

 

My kid refused to do anything during the summer except for a week at Hood and a long week at Tux and you could see him playing catch up the first part of each season.

 

Stay very, very active.  You mention getting points down and see an improvement at the end and IMHO, there is a connection.


Last year I did XC from August to November :/.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Muleski View Post

I was curious, so I shot an email to one of our friends last night. Funded by the school, and the athletes. They pay about $1K in a program fee {very reasonable}. Something like 80-90 racers on the team. It's a real team, not so much of a "club". Wide range of experience, too. 50 pt. FIS skiers to relatively inexperienced. Lots of fun. Sounds like a GREAT program. Guess there's a lot of info on the CU, Boulder website.


I haven't been able to find anything on their USCSA team on their site, only their NCAA team :(. Do you have a link?

post #30 of 31

I'm challenged at posting links. Try this: Google "CU Boulder USCSA", and you should get a link.

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