or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Something to be aware of when buying boots
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Something to be aware of when buying boots

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

If you are buying boots and remove the spoiler for a more upright stance it pays to buy boots that are

half a size bigger as the upright stance will make your feet go forward. I did not notice this when I bought

my boots but only after skiing due to seeing broken toe nails.

post #2 of 11

Awesome 

post #3 of 11

What?

post #4 of 11

That doesn't make any sense for a number of reasons.  I don't think you want to get your heel out of the heel pocket in order to accommodate an upright stance -- you really should get a proper fit that gets both factors right.  Going up a half size may be the same exact shell and liner length anyway. 

 

To me, toenail problems might even mean the boots were too big to begin with.

post #5 of 11

This is plainly wrong.

 

Cassina: looking back at your posting history regarding ski boots, I have to say that your observations are pretty far out of the norm.  I can say with a fair amount of confidence that few-to-no people here would consider adding a gel insole beneath their stock footbeds.


Edited by DtEW - 4/5/2009 at 11:28 pm
post #6 of 11

I don't think so  

post #7 of 11

How many days were the boots skied in?  I could see if it's during the first 10 days when the boot is still busy conforming to your foot, but as the heel pocket opens up and you get the heel further back, this should go away.  If anything, removing the spoiler to accommodate a larger calf should allow the heel to get back in the pocket MORE, at least for any boots I've taken spoilers out of. 

 

Try to lean forward and scoot that heel back BEFORE you buckle, to keep the toe away from the front of the boot.  IF NECESSARY, wack the heel on the floor a few times with your foot in the boot until you are sure the heel is as deeply seated as it will go.  ONLY THEN should you start tightening the boot.  

post #8 of 11

why not buy a boot in the right size, and just get the cuff straightened?

 

That way your heel is back/down, your foot doesn't move around, your toes don't hit the front, AND you have teh F lean you like

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

 

How many days were the boots skied in?  I could see if it's during the first 10 days when the boot is still busy conforming to your foot, but as the heel pocket opens up and you get the heel further back, this should go away.  If anything, removing the spoiler to accommodate a larger calf should allow the heel to get back in the pocket MORE, at least for any boots I've taken spoilers out of. 

 

Try to lean forward and scoot that heel back BEFORE you buckle, to keep the toe away from the front of the boot.  IF NECESSARY, wack the heel on the floor a few times with your foot in the boot until you are sure the heel is as deeply seated as it will go.  ONLY THEN should you start tightening the boot.  

 

The interesting thing with my boot problem is that I have only had it when skiing on 177 & 184

VolkI AC 4 skis which are Mid Fat and it could be that the forces these skis exert on the boot

are possibly throwing my foot forward although I am having no heel lift. I will try what you said and

lean forward before buckling up.


 

post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DtEW View Post

 

This is plainly wrong.

 

Cassina: looking back at your posting history regarding ski boots, I have to say that your observations are pretty far out of the norm.  I can say with a fair amount of confidence that few-to-no people here would consider adding a gel insole beneath their stock footbeds.

 

I did that to a pair of race boots I saw on sale and having never skied in race boots before I found them lacking shock absorbtion in the sole and adding the Gel soles corrected that problem.

I was just responding to a thread about what others thought the difference between race and recreational boots were. If you don't try different gear you will never know if you like it or not and there is nothing wrong with making mods out of the norm as you say if they work and at the same time save money.


Edited by DtEW - 4/5/2009 at 11:28 pm


 

post #11 of 11

Clip your toenails, and go to someone who knows about fitting boots.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Something to be aware of when buying boots