EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Epic Ski Bears that consider themselves experts
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Epic Ski Bears that consider themselves experts - Page 5

post #121 of 141
MilesB I try to stay out of the knarly stuff where I can get hurt.
post #122 of 141
Quote:
I agree Pierre-you can not categorize a skier solely on the terrain they ski. You can only tell an expert by their tracks.
I dont think this tells the whole story. I often ski with people who make far better looking tracks on the groomers, but are all but incapable when I take them on some 45 degree horror show. They end up side slipping down the whole thing or making one turn every minute or so. I think your ability to ski terrain really is different than your ability to make a perfect turn.
post #123 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
epic, Standard poodles are bird dogs, but poodles who are groomed and trained for show don't hunt very well.

What?

I'm not sure what you are getting at. I think you could take a skier who has never seen powder or crud before, and if he has a great turn on groomers, you could set him loose at Big Sky and he'd still be an expert. He'd need a little time to get up to speed, but good skiing is good skiing. Do you disagree?
post #124 of 141
I can get off the chairlift unassisted and I ski like a girl. Can I be an EXPERT?
post #125 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsavo
I can get off the chairlift unassisted and I ski like a girl. Can I be an EXPERT?
Doesn't sound like it from reading some of these posts. Sounds like you need tostesterone instead of estrogen, not.
post #126 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by nealric
I dont think this tells the whole story. I often ski with people who make far better looking tracks on the groomers, but are all but incapable when I take them on some 45 degree horror show. They end up side slipping down the whole thing or making one turn every minute or so. I think your ability to ski terrain really is different than your ability to make a perfect turn.
Please tell me where these 45 degree sections are that you can shush for a whole minute between turns. It sounds like great fun .
post #127 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
epic, Standard poodles are bird dogs, but poodles who are groomed and trained for show don't hunt very well.
Hey Nolo, try this one.

Skilled hunters who are keen of sense in the woods, and routinely bag the birds their poodles flush, will quickly adapt their tactical approach when pursuing a new form of prey, and will prove just as deadly when they come to lay bead on that new target.

FASTMAN
post #128 of 141
so,
another season coming soon. snow is falling in the sierra!
I find this one awfully fuzzy as well. the main problem is that for playing on skis, level is subjective. as a tennis pro, the judgment becomes clear quickly. you either win or lose and as you move up, their is always somebody better (except for roger federer at the moment). I'm an expert tennis player, but there are almost endless levels above and below my level. their are just as many gradations in skiing in my opinion, just less of a clear judgment. i'll say for si, I consider myself an expert. most skiers who see me on the hill would probably agree, but i know many, many, skiers who are signifacantly better. i ski with eski regularly and he makes me feel like an old man who just got his legs, and between he and i, there are quite a few other gradations. in my wanders i've also skied with others i consider world class (tommy moe, jeremy nobis, and others) and you don't need to be world class to be and expert. you don't have to have pro tour victories in tennis to be expert, you have to have mastery of the skills and confidence in your abilty to use them appropriately.

so, on this board, their may be as many people who ski more effeciently and effectively than me as there are who ski with less refined skill and finesse, but my guess there are alot of experts. learning and practicing is great fun, so the continued search is part of the allure of sport. we just keep playing, refining and ocasionally looking for validation (or a badge?) i think it's human and good.


Cheers,

Wade

PS that doesn't mean there is a finish line either. just like in tennis, there is always something to improve, to refine and always someone out there who does something better than you.
post #129 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ott Gangl
Most here understood what I meant when I said that experts don't sweat it. I'll elaborate for those who didn't: a skier, we'll call him an expert, decides to ski today so he throws his equipment in the truck and goes skiing, knowing full well that he can hack it, whatever IT is. There is no big secret to this.

....Ott
I love that description.

I've never understood peoples' hangup on labels, especially in skiing. The other day our Salomon rep was telling a funny story. A guy was working a demo at Hunter. A customer quickly described his skiing, the rep asked a couple questions, the customer gave some answers.

The rep started recommending skis, and said "you've described yourself as an advancing intermediate, and I think this ski..." when he was cut off by the customer.

"WHAT'D YOU CALL ME? Did you just call me an INTUH-MEATY-IT? Who da hell do you tink you are?" And so on.... The reps all had a good laugh at the verbal miscue of the one rep, and went on with life.
-Garrett
post #130 of 141
It must be hunting season.
post #131 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
It must be hunting season.

It is, and your poodle got me thinking of my dad's French Brittany. This dog is an expert hunting dog, he came up to VT last year, with the dog only having seen Pheasants, Huns, and Chukar. Well, the dog blew it the first few times on Grouse and Woodcock, but it didn't take long to figure out how close he could get, if he had to relocate, etc.
post #132 of 141
I read an interesting article the other day about ski conditioning. The researcher-author discussed his findings that there's no dryland analog for skiing, so the only way to become a better skier is to ski a lot. I extrapolate that the only way to become an expert in variable snow and terrain is to spend a lot of time there.

Sure the movement pool transfers from groomed to off piste, but we need to account for experience, which imparts confidence, which are signatures of expert skiing.
post #133 of 141
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ott Gangl

Most here understood what I meant when I said that experts don't sweat it. I'll elaborate for those who didn't: a skier, we'll call him an expert, decides to ski today so he throws his equipment in the truck and goes skiing, knowing full well that he can hack it, whatever IT is. There is no big secret to this.
Like SkiingMan, I love Ott's take on this. It also confirms my label for myself as a non-expert. Every day I ski with my son and occasionally a few skiers who are even better, I wonder if I'll be able to handle the hike and/or the ride down the places I am going to follow them to.
post #134 of 141
Just for the record. I've been skiing for a long time... not nearly as long as some of you, but still, over 40 years is a long time.

I also consider myself an expert, but, like most of you I prefer not to use that label and simply classify good skiers as "good skiers".

You don't get to be a good skier, or an expert without putting in lots of time and lots of miles. It's really hard to do that without experiencing a lot of different conditions along the way. If you spent all those days just skiing in groomed conditions then, no, you aren't an expert and I sure as hell wouldn't want to be skiing a steep, ungroomed, off-piste with variable conditions with you.

Ott is right, when you know you can handle anything you might get into - you're an expert.
post #135 of 141
I won't ever be an expert skier. At nearly 50 years old and still in the learning phase, I think that it would be foolhardy to expect that I'll be skiing "steep, ungroomed, off-piste with variable conditions".

I'm sure I'll get to be a good skier eventually.
Or maybe not, according to some people's idea of what "good" is.

I just wanna have fun, and not think so hard about it.
post #136 of 141
Since my name keeps coming up in this thread I'll elaborate a little. Forty, and even thirty years ago when I was in my thirties and forties folks called me an expert skier because I could ski well, better than most.

Then, all of a sudden those teenagers came along who have never taken a lesson and put my splits and royal christies to shame with their 360s and flips. Thats about the time grooming started and the general public could ski nicely without catching an edge.

Now, I was still getting a little better all the time but suddenly there were skiers all around me who really ripped, skiing unafraid and joyfull. I still could hack it but I had to share the 'expert' label with hoardes of skiers above me. Fine, skiing had finally arrived.

I happily have downgraded my label to 'intermediate' because I am skiing much more cautious than in my younger years. My old bones don't bend as they used to, trees don't jump out of my way as they used to and moguls all of a sudden have taken on giant proportions.

Yet, I never sweat it when I go skiing because I know, if I have to, I can hack anything.

....Ott
post #137 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
I read an interesting article the other day about ski conditioning. The researcher-author discussed his findings that there's no dryland analog for skiing, so the only way to become a better skier is to ski a lot. I extrapolate that the only way to become an expert in variable snow and terrain is to spend a lot of time there.

Sure the movement pool transfers from groomed to off piste, but we need to account for experience, which imparts confidence, which are signatures of expert skiing.
Along this line is simply the understanding of snow that is required for all mountain skiing. This requires all of our senses working to get a feel for the texture, consistency, and the reaction of our skis to these variations. We use our sight to see the changes ahead so we can anticipate, we use our feel under our feet and in our body to feel the way in which the snow is reacting to what we are doing with our skis, along with feeling what we can't see, and we use our hearing to help qualify the input from our other senses. Skiing groomed snow exclusively leaves much of this snow understanding unknown. In my view it is this snow understanding and how we apply ourselves tacticaly and skillfully to the terrain and changing snow conditions that make a good all mountain skier. Good groom skiing does not an all mountain skier make. IMHO

I'll let the rest of you debate whether this equals expert or not. Later, RicB.

P.S. Nolo, how bout a link to the article.
post #138 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni
I won't ever be an expert skier. At nearly 50 years old and still in the learning phase, I think that it would be foolhardy to expect that I'll be skiing "steep, ungroomed, off-piste with variable conditions".

I'm sure I'll get to be a good skier eventually.
Or maybe not, according to some people's idea of what "good" is.

I just wanna have fun, and not think so hard about it.
Just listen to your last sentence and forget the rest of what you wrote, and it will come. There is a Yoda in everyone of us. Later, RicB.
post #139 of 141

why I consider myself an expert

I used to be a drip under pressure
post #140 of 141
Definition of an Expert –Should be able to keep up with a world-class skier.
post #141 of 141
You may have it, Woodee! An expert is someone who skis as well as, and can keep up with, another expert!

Welcome to EpicSki. We've been trying to figure this out for years now!

Perhaps we can finally close the thread....



Best regards,
Bob Barnes
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Epic Ski Bears that consider themselves experts