New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

outer ski drifts wide

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Well this is my first post to this forum. Probably someone will tell me that this issue has been discussed X times before, but here goes...

 

Watching my wife ski I can observe that her outside ski often has a wider turn radius than her inside ski, from approximately the midpoint of the turn onwards. This results in the front tips of her skis being further apart than the tails. I've seens this phenomenon to a smaller extent even on pictures of expert racers, but in her case it seems a bit extreme, especially when she skis aggressively.

 

My first thoughts were that she must have her weight too far back on the ski, but when I watched her ski past (so that I could see from the side) she looked quite nicely balanced over the ski. Could there be other explanations?

 

She is a reasonably aggressive skier, about 75kg skiing on Volkl AC3 163cm. One issue which might or might not be relelvant is that she has relatively fexible boots (flex about 60 if I remember right). She bought them after a long struggle to find some boots which fitted (that's another story, the problem is that she has very large calf muscles relative to the size of her foot), but I wonder whether she gave up too quickly and has settled for something which doesn't allow her to transfer enough power into the ski?

 

Anyway, any suggestions would be interesting to read.

 

Mark

post #2 of 15

She needs to balance more over her outside ski.  She is probably inclinating more so than angulating. 

post #3 of 15

It sounds like she is just overpowering the front of the ski, by loading in in an effort to make it hold a carve.

She could try and load the whole ski by shifting the load back as the turn progresses, but then the whole ski might just slide out.  She could get a more robust ski.

 

She may be loading the inside ski too much and not have enough load on the outside ski, but if she is properly aligned and balanced along the outside ski as you seem to suggest, I think the solution above is more likely.  Sometimes you have to load the inside ski to help out the outside ski, and she might be overdoing it.

 

The AC3 isn't that hard to overload.

post #4 of 15

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by hyperkub View Post

 

Well this is my first post to this forum. Probably someone will tell me that this issue has been discussed X times before, but here goes...

 

Watching my wife ski I can observe that her outside ski often has a wider turn radius than her inside ski, from approximately the midpoint of the turn onwards. This results in the front tips of her skis being further apart than the tails. I've seens this phenomenon to a smaller extent even on pictures of expert racers, but in her case it seems a bit extreme, especially when she skis aggressively.

 

My first thoughts were that she must have her weight too far back on the ski, but when I watched her ski past (so that I could see from the side) she looked quite nicely balanced over the ski. Could there be other explanations?

 

She is a reasonably aggressive skier, about 75kg skiing on Volkl AC3 163cm. One issue which might or might not be relelvant is that she has relatively fexible boots (flex about 60 if I remember right). She bought them after a long struggle to find some boots which fitted (that's another story, the problem is that she has very large calf muscles relative to the size of her foot), but I wonder whether she gave up too quickly and has settled for something which doesn't allow her to transfer enough power into the ski?

 

Anyway, any suggestions would be interesting to read.

 

Mark

 

by drift do you mean literally slides out or just that the skis are pointed oppistte ways?

post #5 of 15

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaSucks View Post

 

She needs to balance more over her outside ski.  She is probably inclinating more so than angulating. 

 

I agree. If you watch again, you will probably see that the inside ski is also advanced relative to the outside ski. She probably is standing more on the inside ski than the outside ski.

post #6 of 15

Too much weight on the inside ski/not enough on the outside to stop the "drifting".

post #7 of 15

Watch her edge angles.  I would guess that she is not tipping both skis at the same time to the same angle.  Part of this is probably a weight directed to the outside ski issue, but I would guess that her outside ski is a bit flatter than the inside.

post #8 of 15

Diverging ski tips is usually an indication of getting on the inside ski.  Check the ski tracks to confirm:  if you see a clean arc on the inside, and a slide on the outside, then the problem is too much on the inside ski.  If it's in the latter part of the turn, there's a timing issue -- she's getting on to the new ski too early. 

 

Observation from the side is a good way to confirm fore/aft balance, now follow right behind to check lateral balance.

 

post #9 of 15

Without actually seeing her ski all of this may or may not be relevant. Without getting a better idea of how the skis move and what she does to make that happen makes it really hard to really say much beyond throwing out generic ideas and theories. Add to that the difference in ski techniques from different parts of the world and it gets so easy to mis-diagnose the cause and the cure. My advice would be to buy her a lesson with a good coach who can tell you exactly what they see and how they would change her skiing.

post #10 of 15

Hype,

 

Is your wife bow-legged? Have the cuffs of her boots been properly adjusted? These issues could lead to different edge angles between the skis. It is either this on not enough pressure on the outside ski.

 

Karl

post #11 of 15

Ask your wife to drill with the tail of the inside ski a few centimeters above the snow.  This will require that she balance over the inside edge of her outside ski.  It'll be tricky for her to do this at first, so start on slope that is very easy for her.  When she's getting good at this, have her advance the point where she picks up the ski tail.  The goal is to lift the tail of the old outside/downhill ski just before she begins the new turn.  Her weight will be on the old inside ski, now the uphill ski, and she keeps her weight on it as she begins the new turn, keeping the new inside ski off the snow all the way around the turn.  Just lifting the tail of the ski allows the tip to serve as a balance point plus helps with fore & aft balance.  To really make this a powerful drill, have her tip the new inside ski to the outside...lift the big toe edge as high as possible and lift it more and more as the turn progresses.

 

As always, fore & aft balance over the center of the outside foot is very important, along with contact with the tongue of the boot.  The balance can be more on the ball of the foot in the first half of the turn.

 

As she masters this drill, have her lower the inside ski to contact with the snow, but always lightened, with maybe 90% of her weight on the outside ski and 10% on the inside ski.  She will balance over the outside ski by bending slightly sideways at the waist toward the outside of the turn and slightly twisting her hips and shoulders to the outside of the turn.  If this doesn't cure her problem if the outside ski drifting out, then she also has an equipment problem.

post #12 of 15

We had a clinic 2 weeks ago with a CSIA Level 4 Examiner and one of the things we explored was the concept of how to maintain "parallel skis" throughout the turn. While a number of factors can contribute to divering tips, one thing we discovered was that we often create different amounts of turning force on each ski throughout the turn and consequently this can have an impact on the parallel attitude of the skis.

 

One drill we did was very interesting, and you might try it.  First start by making a series of wedge turns, and as you make the turns, try to keep the distance between the tips exactly the same (and the tails too).  To do this effectively you will obviously need to focus on turning the legs at the same time and at the appropriate rate and intensity.  You'll find it's pretty hard!

 

When you can do this from a wedge, then simply do a series of turns in the wedge with this focus, and after a few turns transition to parallel turns and try to feel the same sensations (turning movements) when making your turns in parallel.

 

Mike

post #13 of 15

Hyperkub,

 

Welcome to Epic!

 

From the posts above, it could be from quite a few different causes.  I don't think the soft flex of the boot is the issue here.  It also sounds like the outside ski slips away and there is no real divergence of the inside ski.  I think it may be a lateral boot canting issue.  It is worth while to have her lateral alignment checked by a boot fitting specialist.  Often an orthotic foot bed can remedy most of the problems, but sometimes changing the cuff angle or putting a cant on the sole of the boot is required. 

 

It must be an unsettling feeling for your wife to have the outside ski slip away as she skis.  Most shops won't charge anything to check for an alignment problem.  It is worth the time and if it can be fixed, it will make her experience on skis much more rewarding.

 

RW

post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the tips. We are off for a few days skiing over Easter and I'll suggest that she try a few of the ideas mentioned.

 

One thing I did do was look more closely at her skis. I've never been that interested in her equipment, but it seems to me that the Volkl AC3 has the bindings set very far back (the position of the front binding seems to be factory set since the ski is moulded to take a particular binding). I compared it to both my Rossignal Axiom bindings on a ski of similar length (CS70 in 165cm) and my Head Supershapes in 170cm and there was a BIG difference. Somebody commented above that the AC3 is easily overpowered, maybe this is why? Just looking at them by eye I can sense that I would feel "in the back seat" on that ski.

 

Obviously this doesn't quite explain why the phenomenon seems asymmetrical, but that could be a secondary problem.

 

Anyway I think I'll try to persuade her to take half a day on each of the two other pairs of skis I mention above and see how she gets on with them.

 

Thanks again for the ideas :-)

 

Mark

post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 

Just to report back....she skied one day on the AC3s and a couple of days on my Rossignol CS70 skis. The conditions were wet heavy snow with a bit of a crust in the morning, not particularly easy skiing. She did look better on the Rossignols. Smoother turns and cutting through the crud nicely. So I think she is just overpowering the AC3s.

 

My daughter (age 9) hated the crud and ended the first day in tears. So we booked her in for a private lesson for an hour. Ski school rocks! She was allocated a great instructor, a former racer at national level who really knew how to approach the problem. She was much happier and more confident for the rest of the trip.

 

Meanwhile....I took my youngest son (age 7) into the bumps. That was a mistake (ha ha ha) because he totally fried me. I had really serious difficulties in keeping up with him and he did run after run, getting faster all the time. By the end of the day he was dancing down through them and I lay down on the snow exhausted and waved a white flag. Great skiing!

 

Mark

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching