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Hey, I've a question... - Experts & Alignment

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Considering all the recent talk about alignment and what not, How many of you who consider yourself to be an expert have never investigated your alignment, or had any work done?
With perhaps the exception of custom footbeds.
post #2 of 28
Me, I'm aligned naturally. Had custom footbeds done in Taos last season, can't tell the difference.

...Ott
post #3 of 28
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by MarkP:
Considering all the recent talk about alignment and what not, How many of you who consider yourself to be an expert have never investigated your alignment, or had any work done?
With perhaps the exception of custom footbeds.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
post #4 of 28
I had my alignment checked at the Performance Lab at Winter Park 5 years ago, and had both custom footbeds and binding cants (1.5 deg. inside cant) done. I definitely could feel the difference immediately. My edging ability and stance improved markedly.
post #5 of 28
I had my alignment checked at the Performance Lab at Winter Park 5 years ago, and had both custom footbeds and binding cants (1.5 deg. inside cant) done. I definitely could feel the difference immediately. My edging ability and stance improved markedly.
post #6 of 28
Most of the really good "natural" skiers I've worked with over the years were pretty close "right out of the box". Only small changes were needed for "fine tuning".
post #7 of 28
Well, according to the guy who is doing my footbeds, there are things doing on in my feet that make me a decided " UN-NATURAL" for skiing. {Now I FINALLY have an excuse }
Lets see if the new boots and foot beds make a difference.
post #8 of 28
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by MarkP:
Considering all the recent talk about alignment and what not, How many of you who consider yourself to be an expert have never investigated your alignment, or had any work done?
With perhaps the exception of custom footbeds.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Do you mean 'expert skier' or 'expert on alignment?'

I have been able to ski at the 'expert level' for many years. I also skied without checking my alignment for nearly all of them, though I did have "custom footbeds." Over the last 4 years I became aware that my skiing was not developing in the direction I wanted it to go any further. Until I did have my alignment checked and fixed by an expert at it I remained at that plateau. Immediately upon having it fixed with orthotics(Corrective Footbeds), and bootwork my skiing once again continued to develop further, and much more quickly than it had in years.

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ October 18, 2001 10:06 AM: Message edited 1 time, by Roto ]</font>
post #9 of 28
Roto, Who made your othotics?
post #10 of 28
I have always used custom footbeds; Superfeet, Comformable, Etc, and never felt like I had any alignment issues. I even had Bud Heishman (a Reno alignment specialist) look at my stance in my old San Marco ZX9s (admittedly, I did use symflex upper cuff adjustment). He said he had looked at about 500 skiers, and of those four had not needed any work, and I looked to be number five. It felt good to be anatomicaly correct. That season, I passed my PSIA Level 3, and felt pretty good about my skiing. The next season, I got a new pair of boots; the Head WC. From the minute I got on the chair, I could tell something was wrong. Instead of haning flat, my skis pointed skyward. Then I started skiing, and it just got worse. My legs burned on the steeps, I was off balance on every jump. What the hell. I could not carve all the way through my short turn. Then I compared them to my old San Marcos. The ZX9 had a very flat zeppa board, and a very upright upper cuff with a forward lean adjuster, that I had left on upright, and no spoiler. The Heads had much more ramp angle, and forward lean. I spent the next afternoon working on my Heads. I ground down the heel of the zeppa, ground out the back of the upper cuff, stuck in a plastic shim to keep it upright, and rerivited it. I also cut about one inch off the back of the upper cuff, and ditched the spoiler. That night I went skiing, and it was all good.

So I guess I could have qualified, as the naturally aligned expert in my old San Marcos, but not in my Heads. By the way, if anyone reading this has a pair of San Marco ZX9s in a 25/25.5... I'll be your best friend...
post #11 of 28
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Lucky:
Roto, Who made your othotics?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Doug Buteux (Foot Care)

I haven't posted him on the Epicski Bootfitter list since I don't know if he would appreciate all the requested info being posted without his consent.
post #12 of 28
This may sound funny, but socks make a big difference to me. I wear superthin ones, but some liner type socks are slippery and my feet, though tight and in place, don't 'grip' the liner and I feel disconnected form the boots; also my pressure points hurt(though my fit has accomodated them). If I wear other socks of the same thickness with a grippier material I experience no pain and I feel connected to the boots. The best sock I can find are Ultimax hiking or running liners with different density materials in various places. Call me goofy, but I really won't ski in anything else anymore. I hope they don't stop making them.
post #13 of 28
Expert category aside, my left leg was leaning in today. I was working to get it to tip. So I taped some shims to my left boot heel. Problem fixed.

So yeah, alignment can make a big difference.
post #14 of 28
I don't even know what alignment regarding skiing means.
post #15 of 28
Thanks Roto, I know Doug. I have had similar experiences with socks and like Ultimax.
post #16 of 28
Footbeds have never helped my alignment issues. After several years of aligning my athletes I finally set my own boots up the way I had been doing everyone else. WOW what a difference. I finally corrected that "left hip rotation" that had been failing me at Level III for so long.(funny the examiners never figured it out).
I still say, if you've got alignment issues all the instruction there is won't help you.
Alignment lets people who were not "born to ski" acheive a high level of performance.
post #17 of 28
I like it slatz
post #18 of 28
I'm with SLATZ. I just don't notice footbeds.

But canting strips, now those I notice!
post #19 of 28
I just read what SLATZ said again.
I'm even more with him this time.

Getting ready for my third margarita.
post #20 of 28
SCSA
SLAINTE! [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #21 of 28
Good footbeds shouldn't be noticed but cant strips are useless without good footbeds and cuff alignment.
post #22 of 28
'Footbeds' didn't help mw with alignment issue either. Orthotics(corrective footbeds) did.
post #23 of 28
I have a theory. I bet that those that did not notice their footbed, I am willing to bet that these footbeds were acomodative footbeds. Meaning they acomodate what your feet were doing before. IF I had any, I would bet lots of $$ you would notice a canted footbed.
post #24 of 28
I have a theory. I bet that those that did not notice their footbed, I am willing to bet that these footbeds were acomodative footbeds. Meaning they acomodate what your feet were doing before. IF I had any, I would bet lots of $$ you would notice a canted footbed.
post #25 of 28
I have a theory. I bet that those that did not notice their footbed, I am willing to bet that these footbeds were acomodative footbeds. Meaning they acomodate what your feet were doing before. IF I had any, I would bet lots of $$ you would notice a canted footbed.
post #26 of 28
Mosh, why I didn't notice any difference in new footbeds by the experts at Taos was because I had the equivalent home made corrections involving duct tape chewing gum, rubber from bicyle inner tubes and various parts from my previous ski boots.

One of the things I have always done when getting new equipment is to customize it to suit me and I'm not shy in using carpet knives to cut away plastic, hack saws on my poles (matter of fact the poles I ski with now are Scott shafts with generic baskets and Head old time straight handle grips one with the original leather strap and one with a red braided replacement strap from a soft suitcase handle. I don't like contoured grips).

As the footbed technician excavated my boots he called over other guys just to see what comes out of the boots. When he pried the heel lifts out and ended up with long strings of pink chewing gum which I used to keep the heel lifts from sliding forward, they had tears in their eyes from laughing and handed me a can of beer. :

But after going through a couple of hours of footbed making, he essentially replaced all that junk with a one piece footbed which was a little too high under the arch, like standing on a broom handle, and at lunch break they modified the footbeds and they are OK now, but not any different of what I had done myself in my low-tech way.

....Ott
post #27 of 28
regular Rube Goldberg, ehhhh?
post #28 of 28
One set of "footbeds" I used were Peterson Orthotics that were sent to a lab after the impressions were taken. Cost was $125 I beleive in 1984. They didn't change my alignment one bit. Recently PJ Dewey from Lange made me a pair. These also made no difference.
My right leg is functionally shorter than my left. In most high end boots I measure -2 deg left and 0 right. A heel lift makes no difference in the boot. Recently I had a lift put on my right boot. I haven't been on the wands since but it feels the same. I've tried both skis at -2 deg and 0 and like the -2 better.
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