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I need help...

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

To start off with a bit of background around me: I am a snowboard instructor currently learning how to ski. I am looking for a ski that will allow me to progress, that I won't outgrow quickly. These will be used primarily for dorking around, since where I work does NOT have epic pow and such and is basically east coast like conditions. I have been looking at twin tips, specifically the Volkl Ledge and Line Celebrity's, except I have no clue if these will even work for what I want.
My stats are: about 5'2", 120lb's, size 6 boots, female and budget is not a problem.

 

Please help! If I am not asking the right type of questions to help this search, please tell me.

post #2 of 9

There are so many skis out there that would be good but since I am very enamored with Moment right now I will recommend the Moment Stilletto (85mm waist), or the Moment Sierra (96mm waist). Both would be fun to "dork" around on but aren't so soft that will grow out of them too fast. I have no experience with the Volkl Ledge but the Line Celebrity is quite soft and you might grow out of it too fast.
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boarderaholic View Post

 

To start off with a bit of background around me: I am a snowboard instructor currently learning how to ski. I am looking for a ski that will allow me to progress, that I won't outgrow quickly. These will be used primarily for dorking around, since where I work does NOT have epic pow and such and is basically east coast like conditions. I have been looking at twin tips, specifically the Volkl Ledge and Line Celebrity's, except I have no clue if these will even work for what I want.
My stats are: about 5'2", 120lb's, size 6 boots, female and budget is not a problem.

 

Please help! If I am not asking the right type of questions to help this search, please tell me.


 

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

I'm curious, as a new skiier, would it make that much of a difference to be using twin tips or directional?

post #4 of 9

Woops, slight correction to previous post: the Moment Spade (softer) rather than the Stiletto (stiffer) might be the better choice.
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by summerteeth View Post

 

There are so many skis out there that would be good but since I am very enamored with Moment right now I will recommend the Moment Stilletto (85mm waist), or the Moment Sierra (96mm waist). Both would be fun to "dork" around on but aren't so soft that will grow out of them too fast. I have no experience with the Volkl Ledge but the Line Celebrity is quite soft and you might grow out of it too fast.
 

 


 


 

post #5 of 9

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boarderaholic View Post

 

...snowboard instructor currently learning how to ski...

...looking for a ski that will allow me to progress, that I won't outgrow quickly...

...dorking around...

...east coast like conditions...

...twin tips...

...5'2", 120lb's, size 6 boots, female...

 

Money-no-object, and can wait a bit (for next season's stuff):

09/10 K2 Extreme w/inserts, 159cm + Marker Griffin Schizo

 

Money-thrifty, or don't wanna wait (take advantage of current clearance deals):

08/09 K2 Extreme, 159cm + Marker Griffin (mounted +3.5?)

 

It makes a difference for some twins and not for others.  Some twins are really pretty good all-mountain skis in disguise, but can also also do switch and some park.  Other twins are really just very soft park-specific toys that don't work very well out of the park, and are really bad on ice.  The K2 extreme is in the first category.

post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 

When I'm looking at bindings, how much of a performance difference would it make from one binding to the next? Or is that something to be not too concerned about? And what length should I be looking at for skis?

post #7 of 9

I dunno about these answers: these skis might be too fat and too stiff.  I understand that you don't want to grow out of a ski, but to stiff a ski and too side a ski can hold you back if they make it harder to learn to carve: too wide = harder to get on edge and too stiff = won't flex easily enough at slow speeds.  This may not matter if you are aaggressive and like to go fast, and your riding skills will help, but you just might want to get something cheap and softer to play around with for a bit until you are ready to move to something like the suggestions above.  To start figuring this out, what have you done on skis?

 

Oh yeah, and you DO know that good boots matter more than anything else on skis right?

post #8 of 9

Unlike snowboarding, ski bindings generally have little impact on actual skiing performance.  They hold your boots to your skis and that's about it.  You might want lighter bindings if you want to do tricks.

 

However, they are critical to safety.  If the bindings don't work well at releasing your feet when you fall, the long lever of the ski can literally rip your knees to shreds and snap your bones like toothpicks.  And the converse is true: if your bindings don't hold your boots solidly at critical moments and accidentally let go at an inopportune time, the results can be disasterous.  I mean, imagine straight-lining on your board and suddenly you notice that you forgot to strap your boot back in.  That could be bad, right?

 

That said, pretty much all bindings on the market work fairly well, assuming you've chosen one with the right DIN range.  That's the tension setting specific to your stats.

 

Cometjo:

 

I disagree about the approachability of the K2 Extreme.  They're easy to ski, especially for somebody who isn't going to be starting with power wedges at 2mph.  She's a board instructor, fer chrissake.

 

However, we're in complete agreement about the absolute unequivocal importance of getting boots that fit.

 

boarderaholic:

 

First thing, you must get boots that fit.  This is a matter of seeing a reputable professional bootfitter, most likely at a resort town.  This is a real point of difference from boarding: bindings don't matter much, but boots are everything.


Edited by DtEW - 3/31/2009 at 05:14 am
post #9 of 9

I'm gonna have to agree with Dtew here, and definitely disagree with CometJo on the ski comments as far as the models suggested. The k2's suggested by Dtew are quite soft and roll on edge easily, as do the Spade and Sierra from Moment. I do agree that proper boots are the most important part.

 

I taught my wife to ski two seasons ago and she started on a 80mm waisted Atomic that was pretty soft and this season she ditched em for a stiffer 85mm waisted ski and jumped to a 176 length. It's not that is sooo agressive or that she skis 100 days a season. It's just that most of the skis around these are pretty easy to ski, until you get into the stiffest charging models.

 

And besides that, these skis are fun and the girl said she wanted to "dork" around and have fun.

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DtEW View Post

 

Unlike snowboarding, ski bindings generally have little impact on actual skiing performance.  They hold your boots to your skis and that's about it.  You might want lighter bindings if you want to do tricks.

 

However, they are critical to safety.  If the bindings don't work well at releasing your feet when you fall, the long lever of the ski can literally rip your knees to shreds and snap your bones like toothpicks.  And the converse is true: if your bindings don't hold your boots solidly at critical moments and accidentally let go at an inopportune time, the results can be disasterous.  I mean, imagine straight-lining on your board and suddenly you notice that you forgot to strap your boot back in.  That could be bad, right?

 

That said, pretty much all bindings on the market work fairly well, assuming you've chosen one with the right DIN range.  That's the tension setting specific to your stats.

 

Cometjo:

 

I disagree about the approachability of the K2 Extreme.  They're easy to ski, especially for somebody who isn't going to be starting with power wedges at 2mph.  She's a board instructor, fer chrissake.

 

However, we're in complete agreement about the absolute unequivocal importance of getting boots that fit.

 

boarderaholic:

 

First thing, you must get boots that fit.  This is a matter of seeing a reputable professional bootfitter, most likely at a resort town.  This is a real point of difference from boarding: bindings don't matter much, but boots are everything.


Edited by DtEW - 3/31/2009 at 05:14 am



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DtEW View Post

 

 

 

Money-no-object, and can wait a bit (for next season's stuff):

09/10 K2 Extreme w/inserts, 159cm + Marker Griffin Schizo

 

Money-thrifty, or don't wanna wait (take advantage of current clearance deals):

08/09 K2 Extreme, 159cm + Marker Griffin (mounted +3.5?)

 

It makes a difference for some twins and not for others.  Some twins are really pretty good all-mountain skis in disguise, but can also also do switch and some park.  Other twins are really just very soft park-specific toys that don't work very well out of the park, and are really bad on ice.  The K2 extreme is in the first category.



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cometjo View Post

 

I dunno about these answers: these skis might be too fat and too stiff.  I understand that you don't want to grow out of a ski, but to stiff a ski and too side a ski can hold you back if they make it harder to learn to carve: too wide = harder to get on edge and too stiff = won't flex easily enough at slow speeds.  This may not matter if you are aaggressive and like to go fast, and your riding skills will help, but you just might want to get something cheap and softer to play around with for a bit until you are ready to move to something like the suggestions above.  To start figuring this out, what have you done on skis?

 

Oh yeah, and you DO know that good boots matter more than anything else on skis right?


 

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