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"It may take more than Magic to save Magic Mountain" - Page 3

post #61 of 83
Somebody needs to go back and get that one log across the gully out of there or at least paint it orange.  I'll never see that.

You were working on a glade, right.  Looks like they took a lot of trees out.  At what point does a glade become a trail?

Nice work though.  Is there another work weekend scheduled or is every weekend a work day?
post #62 of 83
Thanks guys!  Glad you like the work and the stoke! 

Buzz, you'r the only person to notice that picture...  And when you come to Magic this winter, I just might have to show you where it is!  (sans clothesline branch, of course!) 

The area we were working on was by far the most open area in that glade, there's alot more trees on the rest of it.  The sheer number of fun features in there were staggering- the Magic crew really, REALLY knows how to site a fun glade.  I practically made myself dizzy imagining all the awesome combos of lines through it while I was working.  

I made sure to leave the leaves/pine needles and spongy ground cover to help cushion for core shots.  Also I moved any rocks i could, smashed others that had shark tooth-looking spines and generally tried to make it as base-friendly as possible, as I'm sure the cover will get bony at some point and every little bit helps. 

As for work schedule, Matt in the Magic office assures me that any day someone wants to work, there's work to be done.  Just call him if you don't know where to go and he'll point you in the right direction.  I work all week so my volunteer days are usually weekends, but I've been putting in a bunch of OT this week so I can take Friday off, as the weekend weather is supposed to suck.  I'm planning on going up either Thursday late night or Friday morning and staying until the weather forces me to leave.  Hopefully it doesn't.    

If anyone wants to go up or know someone who does, please do so or encourage them to get involved.  It really is just so gorgeous up there it's a real treat just to be in the mountains at this time of year.  Between the foliage, the temperatures and the general scenery it's where it's at right now.  You don't need to be a big, jacked up lumberjack or even a guy to make it worthwhile being there.  Any help is appreciated!

P.S.- I don't know if those pictures just "magically" worked or somebody fixed them...  If it's the latter, THANKS! 

   
Edited by Do Work - 9/29/09 at 8:30am
post #63 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Do Work View Post

Buzz, you'r the only person to notice that picture...  And when you come to Magic this winter, I just might have to show you where it is!  (sans clothesline branch, of course!) 

 


Trust me, I know where it is.  I don't duck as well as I used to.
post #64 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Do Work View Post

Man, I suck at teh interwebz.  Help pleeeez? 

First of all, your pictures are inspired!
Your work is inspired!
and you're making the posting far more difficult than it needs to be. 
Just copy the content of post complete with pics, by highlighting and copying, then come here and click PASTE!  Voila!
This is a repost from the "Save Magic" thread, but I felt it belonged here to set the stokage off right. I hope nobody minds. 

Sorry, a couple of the pics are blurry I spontaneously suck at times. Here's a few trail whoopage shots first.

We hiked up there and immediately started to clear- This is about an hour into it. Still looking pretty hairy. 

Better get to work... 

Bigger picture from farther back. 

After about another hour and change, we said "We're gonna need a bigger boat! So we called for reinforcements... 

And in about four more hours, we had it pretty well cleaned up. I'm obviously skipping by a bunch of pics that you can't tell shit from, but you get the idea. 



And then we decided to go for a hike before we left, it was too nice not to see some sights. 




And then the big guy had enough... Who knew hiking to work was so hard??? 

A few parting shots... 




I hope you guys enjoyed the pics. If you're thinking about heading up at all, DO IT! they need your help and it's a great time of the year to be in the hills.
post #65 of 83
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Do Work View Post

I made sure to leave the leaves/pine needles and spongy ground cover to help cushion for core shots.  Also I moved any rocks i could, smashed others that had shark tooth-looking spines and generally tried to make it as base-friendly as possible, as I'm sure the cover will get bony at some point and every little bit helps.    

Forget the ski bases, move that spongy ground cover up to the trees, about five feet high, to help cushion helmet shots.  Helmets are expensive to replace after they crack. 

Thanks for your efforts, Do Work.  I can't wait to sample your handi-work after a big dump.  Hopefully, you can guide me to the spot.
post #66 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by liv4ski View Post




Forget the ski bases, move that spongy ground cover up to the trees, about five feet high, to help cushion helmet shots.  Helmets are expensive to replace after they crack. 

Thanks for your efforts, Do Work.  I can't wait to sample your handi-work after a big dump.  Hopefully, you can guide me to the spot.
 
Sorry but that line made me ROFLMAO
A bran muffin and coffee on the way to Magic? 
post #67 of 83
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post



Sorry but that line made me ROFLMAO
A bran muffin and coffee on the way to Magic? 
 

You've been watching too much Borat, TC!



Now, back to our regularly scheduled programming.

post #68 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by liv4ski View Post




Forget the ski bases, move that spongy ground cover up to the trees, about five feet high, to help cushion helmet shots.  Helmets are expensive to replace after they crack. 

Thanks for your efforts, Do Work.  I can't wait to sample your handi-work after a big dump.  Hopefully, you can guide me to the spot.

 


yeah I hear those trees don't move...  and neither do the fat bastards standing in the middle of the trail...   



Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post



Sorry but that line made me ROFLMAO
A bran muffin and coffee on the way to Magic? 

 


I's expect no less from the queen of commodery...  
post #69 of 83
Bump.  I'm heading up tonight for early work tomorrow.  Anybody else are to join me? 
post #70 of 83
Thread Starter 
This is very troubling news for Magic.  I wonder how many people would have paid, or will pay, $3,000 for a co-op share after reading this.

Law firm settles claim against former partner
By Daniel Tepfer Staff writer Updated: 10/19/2009 03:08:30 PM EDT BRIDGEPORT --

A Fairfield law firm has agreed to pay more than $1 million to former clients who were ripped off by a member of the firm who left his law practice two years ago to take over a Vermont ski resort.

In a settlement reached before Superior Court Judge Richard Arnold, the firm of Kevin Maher and Scott Williams agreed to pay $1.5 million to settle two lawsuits involving former associate James Sullivan.

"This litigation goes back 12 years," said plaintiffs' lawyer, Douglas Mahoney of Tremont and Sheldon. "My clients were truly victimized by attorney Sullivan and they are glad the matter is finally over." Williams declined to comment on the settlement.

Sullivan, who left the area in 2007 in order to run Magic Mountain in Londonderry, Vt., could not be reached for comment. He was not in court for the settlement.

In April 1999, five members of the Sieling family of Newtown were injured in a motor vehicle accident when their car was hit head-on by another driver, according to their lawsuit. The family had hired Sullivan to represent them in a lawsuit seeking damages for their injuries against the other driver.

Sullivan filed a lawsuit on behalf of the family in 2001 at Bridgeport Superior Court. But when he took no other action, the case was dismissed by a judge.

But Sullivan never told the Sieling family the case had been dismissed, according to the malpractice claim, and until late 2006 was telling the family their case was pending and that everything was fine.

Mahoney said Sullivan would meet to prepare the family for court procedures, but the case never moved forward. He said the Sieling family did not learn about the case's dismissal until they became concerned by how long the process was taking and spoke to another lawyer.
 

In a second lawsuit, Dr. Roy Kalman of Woodbridge, said he hired Sullivan in 1999 to collect disability insurance benefits that he was owed. From 1999 through the end of 2006, Sullivan told Kalman he was aggressively pursuing his case and had filed lawsuits against the insurance companies to collect those benefits, the lawsuit states.
 

It was not until after Sullivan began operating his ski resort that Kalman learned that his lawyer had never filed the lawsuits against the insurance companies, Mahoney said.
 

Sullivan, who has been practicing law since 1993, is president of Magic Mountain and managing partner of a management team that bought the bankrupt resort. He lives in Manchester, Vt.

http://www.connpost.com/ci_13594942?source=email

post #71 of 83
Yikes - They could seize the mountain.
post #72 of 83
 When it rains it pours. 
post #73 of 83
 Ugh, Double ugh...
post #74 of 83
 As one who lived in South Londonderry a long time ago it was great to see the photos. In regard to the news about the settlement, most likely it was paid by the firm's malpractice insurance. The question will be whether they are seeking any recourse against Sullivan. If the mountain's corporate structure is set up right it should be safe from collection efforts against Sullivan. Unfortunately this type of situation is happens regularly in the law business - the neglect of a client matter and then the attempt to cover it up. His license is probably at risk. If he wants to maintain credibility he should resign and turn the corporation over to someone with impeccable financial credentials.
post #75 of 83
ouch......
post #76 of 83
 Once upon a time I interviewed Hans Thorner at Magic. I asked him why the trails were so nice when there had not been much snow lately. He delightedly told a story about grooming that showed what kind of an economist one had to be to turn a profit at a small Vermont ski area (Swiss). In the summer he leased out the mountain trails to a goat farmer. The goats ate the grass and brush. The goats did a better job than any machine could on that steep terrain. And Thorner did not have to pay someone to cut the grass and brush.
post #77 of 83
I'd suggest people stop and think before getting their panties in a bunch about that malpractice settlement.  "Seize the mountain?"  Really? 

Anyone who truly is concerned with this ought to just call Jim Sullivan at Magic and see what he can say (which probably is limited by confidentiality provisions that are typical in settlements of this sort).

I was able to find some public information on the malpractice insurance dispute (between the law firm and its malpractice carrier) and it looks to me like the insurance company decided to pony up after the court in the coverage case allowed pleadings which expose it to bad faith liability for failing to meet obligations to defend the law firm and for ignoring a court order. 

So it may be a lot less awful and a lot more complicated than a one-sided story in the local paper suggests. No one has admitted any liability.  Plaintiffs got some money for hitting up a firm which has every incentive to blame it on the guy who left.  Plaintiffs counsel did a little grandstanding to a lazy local reporter who put out just one side of the story; and the other side probably can't be argued due to the settlement, or for insurance reasons.

Lawyers - like doctors, architects, accountants, ski resort operators, and everyone else  -- face liability claims that may or may not have merit and that often get settled for reasons that do not reflect moral worth or  "financial credentials."  One of the big differences though is lawyers attract litigious customers  - duh - who often continue litigating if things don't go perfectly in a process which is adversarial and not likely to satisfy everyone in the first place.
post #78 of 83
Well said TS01
post #79 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverback View Post

 Once upon a time I interviewed Hans Thorner at Magic. I asked him why the trails were so nice when there had not been much snow lately. He delightedly told a story about grooming that showed what kind of an economist one had to be to turn a profit at a small Vermont ski area (Swiss). In the summer he leased out the mountain trails to a goat farmer. The goats ate the grass and brush. The goats did a better job than any machine could on that steep terrain. And Thorner did not have to pay someone to cut the grass and brush.

Oct 21, 2009

Along the same lines, many years ago, Ski Magazine published an interview with Hans Thorner.  They saw him clearing rocks and debris from the trails and asked him the reason.  He replied:  "Since the area doesn't have snow making, clearing the trails during the summer and fall months, provides for enjoyable skiing in the winter even with marginal snow coverage".  He was Green ahead of his time .

Think snow,

CP
post #80 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverback View Post

 Once upon a time I interviewed Hans Thorner at Magic. I asked him why the trails were so nice when there had not been much snow lately. He delightedly told a story about grooming that showed what kind of an economist one had to be to turn a profit at a small Vermont ski area (Swiss). In the summer he leased out the mountain trails to a goat farmer. The goats ate the grass and brush. The goats did a better job than any machine could on that steep terrain. And Thorner did not have to pay someone to cut the grass and brush.

HA!  i just had the same conversation with someone else who was volunteering up there last weekend.  Goats can not only handle steep terrain, but they also chew up smaller sticks and twigs.  They are great at clearing and if you have like 30 of them they do it pretty quick.  I'm with Ts01, we are only hearing one side fo the story here so I'm not going to get too fired up about it.  Magic is opening and that's all that matters.   
post #81 of 83
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Do Work View Post




HA!  i just had the same conversation with someone else who was volunteering up there last weekend.  Goats can not only handle steep terrain, but they also chew up smaller sticks and twigs.  They are great at clearing and if you have like 30 of them they do it pretty quick.  I'm with Ts01, we are only hearing one side fo the story here so I'm not going to get too fired up about it.  Magic is opening and that's all that matters.   


The goats are still at Magic.  They have evolved a little, however.  They can ski the trails they cleared.

post #82 of 83
Dude I love that pic.  Thanks for the new Avatar, but EVERYBODY knows I have twin tips
post #83 of 83
There was a story in our newspaper recently that one of the local towns is using goats to clear a meadow in a park -- free to the town, and the goat owner saves on hay.
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