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Efficient Hot Waxing, Scraping and Brushing

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

 

Following are two videos, a few minutes long, showing various hot waxing techniques, along with minimal scraping and roto-brushing to bang out waxing tasks in little time and with little mess. Not including cooling and hardening time (20 minutes, minimum) the total time involved could be easily under 15 minutes and possibly 10 per pair or snowboard. Using liquid wax, the time could be 5 minutes:




Edited by Alpinord - 11/26/09 at 2:13pm
post #2 of 24
Thread Starter 

So, I finally got around to creating a couple video clips and uploading them to YouTube. Hopefully, they'll be of benefit for some. After fumbling through the process and getting a better handle on that, I can now focus better on content, quality and formatting issues.

 

Please provide any insights on how to better approach this medium where the sky is the limit.

 

  1. Does it get the point across?
  2. Too long or too short?
  3. Music or a babbling narration?
  4. Toss in some graphic details and tool and supply checklist?
  5. What other topics would be helpful?
  6. Should this be Wikified?
  7. Is it better to keep the 'garage/shop set' or 'sterilize' it?
  8. Any other thoughts or criticisms?

 

post #3 of 24

I am a rookie, never ever done this myself. I feel I could handle it now.Given the right tools and supplies. Not much mystery after watching a start to finish video. I found the captions at bottom of screen difficult to read. Font size, clarity...., The setting is real.

 

Thank you.

post #4 of 24

Is there a substitute for the fiberlene paper that is as thin and that I can buy somewhere other than a ski specific shop?  Is a suitable substitute available at wally world or home depot/lowes?  Is this miracle paper only available at ski shops?

-Z

post #5 of 24

Very nice Terry!  The numbering the corners trick is great, I have "A" and "B" on mine.  

 

I think instead of using titles, which make the eye go back and forth between the visual and the textual information, that using a Voice Over would work better, because the eye can watch the pictures and the ear can hear the words.  Wouldn't have to be full narration if you didn't want - could just read the titles.

 

Good job, keep 'em coming!

post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys. Glad the major intent of lighting up a few light bulbs of understanding seems to be working.

 

As far as I know, Fiberlene isn't a local building center product, but I would imagine that it's lint-free, absorbent, heat resistant and slight abrasive properties are available in other products. The shop towels 'work' but can scorch and are not as lint free, but are not out of the question as a cheap and available option. I rarely use either for wax absorption since it's pretty easy to apply only a small amount of wax and light scrape it quicker and easier.

 

The clips are/will be altered as I experiment with other formats, including HD. The text improves, but probably starting with a larger text size is best. The improved clips have a 'HD' button to change to high definition. Additionally, by clicking on the window after the clip starts will open the YouTube page and you can view the clips in a larger viewing area.

 

SMJ, one argument of leaving the tunes and titles/text is after a couple times viewing you can simple watch and let it sink in (hopefully). At some point I'll upload one with some babbling and compare.

 

Best regards,

Terry


Edited by Alpinord - 3/27/2009 at 04:50 am
post #7 of 24

Nice videos.

I actually very much like the text 'chapter' titles except the lower font is too small to read in that format. Everybody and their brother does talking - boring plus you can't watch it without sound. It's also a lot more work to do it well.

 

You might incorporate some still shots for punctuation  to indicat what level of work gives what look.  That shot of the structure above is nice but it's not in the video.  People starting out have no idea of what to look for when scraping/brushing.

Some closer shots of the ironing and brushing process would be nice. A mention of the whole tip - tail mess that Seth Masia started with his book - that you always go tip to tail. Sheesh the pain that caused when trying to figure out how to file. Then I realized it's ridiculous except for brushing/scraping.

post #8 of 24
Thread Starter 

You've touched on several items I'll add in the future. I think I have the resolution and upload options resolved and will bump the text an add some still shots, close-ups and details.

 

On the Hot Waxing video, the first 'scene' has larger text. How does that text size work for readability?

 

One good thing/bad thing about editing videos is that you cannot replace an existing one with a new version but need to delete the previous one. This in turn gives it a new URL.

post #9 of 24

excellent videos.  thanks again for publishing them.

 

on the subject of fiberlene alternatives, anybody ever use plain brown paper bags(or something maybe like butcher paper)to absorb the excess wax?  when applied with an iron, regular brown bags absorb candle wax on clothing.  then again, maybe it does too good a job and could dry out your base.

post #10 of 24

Great videos.  Was the amount of wax used in the video what typically should be used, or was it for demonstration purposes.  Judging by what I see in the video, I think I've been using wayyyy too much wax. 

post #11 of 24

Most people do use an order of magnitude too much wax.  I crayon it on first, then do two passes of drips along the length of the ski.  It results in a LOT less wax than I used to put down.

 

I have a question for Terry -- what's your thought on scraping the ski when the wax is still just a little bit warm and soft?  Reason I ask, is that I did this accidentally a couple weeks ago.  After waxing, I put my skis aside to cool before scraping.  I was doing  bunch of skis that day, and accidentally scraped a ski that was still a little warm.  The wax came off nice and easy (which was the clue) and resulted in a lot less of a mess.  I figured "what the heck" and brushed the ski.  

 

In the end, I had one ski that was scraped and brushed totally cool, and the other ski that was done slightly warm.  After 4 days on the skis, I saw no difference, visually or in terms of performance.  So it makes me wonder if there is merit in scraping a ski before it totally cools off, while the wax is still a bit soft.  It was certainly easier  and less messy.

post #12 of 24

Now have a tuning bench set up and looking forward to learning the ins and outs of waxing my own skis.  Have looked through some threads and videos and have the basic idea.  My question -- optimal type of wax depends on temperature and snow conditions (wet/dry/sharp/soft, etc).  Do any experienced Tahoe skiers have suggestions for waxes they think are best for those conditions during different points in season?  If you get caught in a situation where you can't do a full scale wax (say you're travelling and don't have set up) and don't have time to drop off, is there anything you can do in the short term (universal wax more easily applied that you can carry around with you?).  Also, headed for Summit County shortly..suggested wax for current conditions there?  Thanks in advance!!!

post #13 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tekweezle View Post

 

excellent videos.  thanks again for publishing them.

 

on the subject of fiberlene alternatives, anybody ever use plain brown paper bags(or something maybe like butcher paper)to absorb the excess wax?  when applied with an iron, regular brown bags absorb candle wax on clothing.  then again, maybe it does too good a job and could dry out your base.

I know a lot of people recommend brown paper bags for skin glue removal which is similar to the video clip. A purist would same only fiberlene because it's lint free, but for those more practically minded, I'd think the brown paper bags in the same realm as the shop towels.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillT View Post

 

Great videos.  Was the amount of wax used in the video what typically should be used, or was it for demonstration purposes.  Judging by what I see in the video, I think I've been using wayyyy too much wax. 

The objective is to end up with only a thin layer of wax. So starting out with as thin as possible is still more than you need and this is one reason high-melt liquids work well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

 

Most people do use an order of magnitude too much wax.  I crayon it on first, then do two passes of drips along the length of the ski.  It results in a LOT less wax than I used to put down.

 

I have a question for Terry -- what's your thought on scraping the ski when the wax is still just a little bit warm and soft?  Reason I ask, is that I did this accidentally a couple weeks ago.  After waxing, I put my skis aside to cool before scraping.  I was doing  bunch of skis that day, and accidentally scraped a ski that was still a little warm.  The wax came off nice and easy (which was the clue) and resulted in a lot less of a mess.  I figured "what the heck" and brushed the ski.  

 

In the end, I had one ski that was scraped and brushed totally cool, and the other ski that was done slightly warm.  After 4 days on the skis, I saw no difference, visually or in terms of performance.  So it makes me wonder if there is merit in scraping a ski before it totally cools off, while the wax is still a bit soft.  It was certainly easier  and less messy.

Sometimes I reheat the wax after light scraping when in doubt, but have not noticed any difference because you still haven;t removed all the wax and have more than enough with the remaining thin layer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski Spirit View Post

 

Now have a tuning bench set up and looking forward to learning the ins and outs of waxing my own skis.  Have looked through some threads and videos and have the basic idea.  My question -- optimal type of wax depends on temperature and snow conditions (wet/dry/sharp/soft, etc).  Do any experienced Tahoe skiers have suggestions for waxes they think are best for those conditions during different points in season?  If you get caught in a situation where you can't do a full scale wax (say you're travelling and don't have set up) and don't have time to drop off, is there anything you can do in the short term (universal wax more easily applied that you can carry around with you?).  Also, headed for Summit County shortly..suggested wax for current conditions there?  Thanks in advance!!!

Maplus Race Medium (purple) works well in Tahoe and Colorado for a broad range of temperatures and snow types AND is more than twice as durable as any Universal wax.

 

Hopefully, I'll get a couple updated videos with close ups of bases uploaded later toda.

 

post #14 of 24

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski Spirit View Post

  If you get caught in a situation where you can't do a full scale wax (say you're travelling and don't have set up) and don't have time to drop off, is there anything you can do in the short term (universal wax more easily applied that you can carry around with you?).

 

It doesn't take much to wax skis.  All you need is an iron, wax, and a chair with arm rests.  Put your skis across the arm rests.  Apply the wax, and then go ski. 

 

I find that in a rush, you don't have to scrape--the snow will scrape your skis for you. Of course, you could always just quickly scrape your skis outside, right before you ski. 

post #15 of 24

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillT View Post

 

Great videos.  Was the amount of wax used in the video what typically should be used, or was it for demonstration purposes.  Judging by what I see in the video, I think I've been using wayyyy too much wax. 

 

I'd be careful with using too little wax.  If your iron gets too hot and you have too little wax, you could damage your base with the excessive heat.  I use liberal amounts of wax for that purpose.  But then again, I only wax with cheap universal waxes, so the cost of the wax isn't an issue....

post #16 of 24

 Spirit, I ended up going with universal wax.  I tried targeting specific waxes to conditions, but frequently ended up with the wrong wax and felt the skis suffered.  With universal, they are never "optimum", but I haven't run into cases where the wax led to noticeably sucky performance.  Terry's recommendation for purple is good too -- I am going to give that a try next season.

post #17 of 24

A couple of observations., Terry

 

You pull the scraper but you push the Roto? 

 

I scrape & roto bases and sharpen and polish edges always pulling towards me.

 

secondly, no discussion of Direction of rotation of the Roto.

 

I know when rotobrushing pulling towards me brush at the bottom should be rotating away from me. In your method should brush be rotating at bottom towards you? is this in fact what yu are doing/

 

Thx

 

CW

 

post #18 of 24
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

 

A couple of observations., Terry

 

You pull the scraper but you push the Roto? 

 

I scrape & roto bases and sharpen and polish edges always pulling towards me.

 

secondly, no discussion of Direction of rotation of the Roto.

 

I know when rotobrushing pulling towards me brush at the bottom should be rotating away from me. In your method should brush be rotating at bottom towards you? is this in fact what yu are doing/

 

Thx

 

CW

 

 

Pulling versus pulling scraper is a persoanl preference. Direction tip to tail versus tail to tip is irrelevant IMO.

 

I think brushing tip to tail makes for sense and is SOP,  but by the time it's polished out I can't really believe that the direction you go will affect most of us in any meaningful amount.

 

I push the roto brush to push the dust away with the rotation pushing towards the tails as well.

 

(BTW, A-Man, how far is Bellevue from Bellingham? FWIW, we'll be here until Wednesday. It'd be great to hook up if practical.)

 

 

post #19 of 24

I know all this just commenting for others benefit.

I don't think it makes any difference which direction you brush, but it does make a difference which direction the brush is rotating.

 

Aslong as you have the brush rotating at the bootom towards you if you are pusing and away from if you are pulling it is the same, dust makes no difference. the brush spits it out the same way!

 

What about drill speed????

 

Bellingham is 1.5 hours from Bellevue, what's your schedule next week. you should come down an ski Crystal on Wednesday!

post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 

I just run full rpm's on the drill. Brainless and does the job.

 

Unfortunately, we opted to forego schlepping gear (this time) for a family visit and will be leaving Wednesday.


Edited by Alpinord - 3/28/2009 at 11:20 pm
post #21 of 24


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

Maplus Race Medium (purple) works well in Tahoe and Colorado for a broad range of temperatures and snow types AND is more than twice as durable as any Universal wax.

 

Hopefully, I'll get a couple updated videos with close ups of bases uploaded later toda.

 

Thanks for suggestion Alpinord.  Extra info, especially videos welcomed.  More durable wax-------meaning skis will go an extra day or more w/out waxing?



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrzinwin View Post

 

 

 

It doesn't take much to wax skis.  All you need is an iron, wax, and a chair with arm rests.  Put your skis across the arm rests.  Apply the wax, and then go ski. 

 

I find that in a rush, you don't have to scrape--the snow will scrape your skis for you. Of course, you could always just quickly scrape your skis outside, right before you ski. 


mrzinwin -- That is a very practical suggestion.  Thanks for making it.
 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

 

 Spirit, I ended up going with universal wax.  I tried targeting specific waxes to conditions, but frequently ended up with the wrong wax and felt the skis suffered.  With universal, they are never "optimum", but I haven't run into cases where the wax led to noticeably sucky performance.  Terry's recommendation for purple is good too -- I am going to give that a try next season.


 

   Skier219--Thanks for comment.  When in doubt, it sounds like universal wax is  a good option to fall back on.  I'm going to try the purple wax too and see what that's like.

post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski Spirit View Post
Thanks for suggestion Alpinord.  Extra info, especially videos welcomed.  More durable wax-------meaning skis will go an extra day or more w/out waxing?

 

Medium or high melt, higher grade paraffin wax takes higher iron temperature (140 to 160°C) to melt because it's harder. Low melt paraffins (120°C) like Universals are softer and will wear off sooner.

 

Colder and harder wax not scraped will not 'self scrape' as readily on soft snow as on more aggressive snows, like man-made.

post #23 of 24


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

 

 

 

Medium or high melt, higher grade paraffin wax takes higher iron temperature (140 to 160°C) to melt because it's harder. Low melt paraffins (120°C) like Universals are softer and will wear off sooner.

 

Colder and harder wax not scraped will not 'self scrape' as readily on soft snow as on more aggressive snows, like man-made.


 

      Thanks for providing explanation Alpinord!

post #24 of 24

Many ways to skin a cat!  Here is how I do it.

 

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