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kinda of GS turns for ma

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

my most recent thing I have been working on has been eliminating knee angulation to be strong on faster turns.

 

wasnt really trying to tighten raduis at all so yes I do realize these could be 'tighter' but more focus on being on a strong outside ski than anything else.

 

 

curious what you guys think. epic and helva please post up!

post #2 of 16

Bush, Really like the sound effects at slow mo on the grass/air turn. One piece of adivise I would give is to dial back on the edge angle you are creating on the outside ski and add more edge angle to the inside ski. Think of it as tipping/edge angle on a scale of 1-5 well 0-5 actually with zero being a flat ski. It looks like you get to 5 immediately on the outside ski where as the inside ski is around 3, Legs are connected together at the pelvis let the inside leg lead the tipping process (0-5)and the outside will mirror that. Also looks like that snow was pretty soft and feedback from the skis will not be as direct especially when compared to a firmer surface. But good skiing none the less. Let me know if you come up to VT. for any spring skiing.

post #3 of 16

Bushwackerinpa,

 

It looks like you are pressing into the tongue of the boot too much and getting tail wash.  This may explain why you are using such extreme angles, but not getting as much out of the ski as you could get using ankle flex.  At the speed you are going, your transitions could be retracted instead of extended at edge change.

 

RW

 

 

 

post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White View Post

 

Bushwackerinpa,

 

It looks like you are pressing into the tongue of the boot too much and getting tail wash.  This may explain why you are using such extreme angles, but not getting as much out of the ski as you could get using ankle flex.  At the speed you are going, your transitions could be retracted instead of extended at edge change.

 

RW

 

 

 

 

the extentions were by design, trying to get rid of the double knee angulation I have back off retraction to try to get a stronger outside leg.

 

I can easily do retractions next time out(very well might for comparision) but I am starting to think that the place for those are in SL turns.

 

interesting I though I was actually back most of that video.....I blame it on the twins and soft sticky snow. but you think I am to much on the tongues?

post #5 of 16

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White View Post

 

Bushwackerinpa,

 

It looks like you are pressing into the tongue of the boot too much and getting tail wash.  This may explain why you are using such extreme angles, but not getting as much out of the ski as you could get using ankle flex.  At the speed you are going, your transitions could be retracted instead of extended at edge change.

 

RW

 

 

 

I was wondering about this myself.  How much ankle dorsiflexion is required during carving turns?  Should I be concentrating on having my ankles dorsiflexed maximally all the times?  Some of the time? (I'm going to get shin splints if it's all the time!!)  

 

I recently discovered that ankle dorsiflexion in bumps is like a magic bullet for staying in the front seat.  Is that also true for carving?

 

Another thing---I realized recently that overpressuring the tips leads to tail washout.  If I pressure the tails more, I get much better edge hold.  However, then, I feel like I'm somewhat in the back seat.   Perhaps if I pressured the tails, and combined that with ankle dorsiflexion, that would help????

post #6 of 16

Josh - check your PM.

 

Edit: Answer to the dorsiflexion question mrzinwin - a lot more than you're probably currently using.

post #7 of 16

mrzinwin,

 

Quote:

Another thing---I realized recently that overpressuring the tips leads to tail washout.  If I pressure the tails more, I get much better edge hold.  However, then, I feel like I'm somewhat in the back seat.   Perhaps if I pressured the tails, and combined that with ankle dorsiflexion, that would help????

Many skiers confuse pressing the knees forward into the boot tongue with dorsiflexion.  Levering forward does cause tail wash and only the ball of the foot to bare the skiers load while with dorsiflexion there is contact with the tongue of the boot, but the whole foot equally contacts the foot bed of the boot.  You should feel your weight mostly on the arch of the foot as you carve.

 

I open my ankle up a little as I start a turn (by pressing the big toe down), but then progressively flex my ankles through the turn.  So, the answer to your question is yes, and as Heluvaskier said, "more than you are currently using".

 

RW

post #8 of 16

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White View Post

 

mrzinwin,

 

Many skiers confuse pressing the knees forward into the boot tongue with dorsiflexion.  Levering forward does cause tail wash and only the ball of the foot to bare the skiers load while with dorsiflexion there is contact with the tongue of the boot, but the whole foot equally contacts the foot bed of the boot.  You should feel your weight mostly on the arch of the foot as you carve.

 

I open my ankle up a little as I start a turn (by pressing the big toe down), but then progressively flex my ankles through the turn.  So, the answer to your question is yes, and as Heluvaskier said, "more than you are currently using".

 

RW

 

That makes a lot of sense.  Thanks for the tip!

post #9 of 16

I'm impressed anybody can ski that well given the conditions. I'm very familar (unfortunately) with what was being served up . Didn't bother you.

post #10 of 16

Bushwacker,,, getting better. 

 

Sometimes a little too square to your skis.  Square restricts your ability to angulate at the hip, so all that's left to compensate is angulating at the knee. 

 

And,,, create your counter by driving the new inside hip forward, not dropping the outside hip back.  Play around with it a bit and feel the difference. 

 

Just a couple things to think about,,, but like I said,,, getting better. 

 

www.YourSkiCoach.com

post #11 of 16

post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by karpiel View Post

 

 

I have a mountain bike no thanks

post #13 of 16

I sent Josh a very extensive PM (he can attest to how extensive it was) that included a list of positives and negatives that I saw as well as a list of drills that he could use to bring about drastic improvements. He has a solid season or more worth of work ahead of him I think. Below is a short version of the list of areas that need work in no particular order:

 

  • Forcing movement to the inside (often angulation); forcing edge angles
  • No outside ski balance
  • Not letting the turn come to him
  • On the inside ski
  • Stance often too wide
  • Outside ski is acting as no more than an outrigger
  • Knee angulation is still very prevalent (see other items for potential reasons why)
  • Hips are back most of the time (insightful comment from Rick on creating counter that is often overlooked btw)
  • Timing issues are causing up un-weighting at times
  • Alignment is F.U.B.A.R.

 

With that said, Josh's skiing has been improving very rapidly, even after he left the real mountains to join us back east. He is quite dedicated to improving his skiing and it definitely shows (especially in his bump skiing for those who haven't been paying attention). I expect that his dedication will show even more as he continues to improve. Its fun to watch. Keep up the good work.

 

Later,

 

Greg

post #14 of 16

From my point of view its simple:

 

  • Too early in the turn too much down
  • Too much angulation way above fall line
  • Not going across and forward enough

 

You basically swing your hips from one side to other. Because you don't extend enough and flex very quickly you run out of the movement right in the beginning of the turn and towards end of the turn you have no other way to go  then even more down and back. Or u don't move at all, and just park and ride. I think that may cause all the other problems.

Extend more forward and across by extending your outside leg and wait all the way to the fall line for skis to create presure before you start slowly angulate towards end of the turn.

Drills: Do more leapers, white pass turns...

 

Dorsi flexion in carved turns: Be careful with it. What happen very often is that because of big forces created towards end of the turn, the ankle "collapse" and overflex. You can get this huge rebound from boots and skis which is quite hard to handle.

 

post #15 of 16

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White View Post

 

Bushwackerinpa,

 

It looks like you are pressing into the tongue of the boot too much and getting tail wash.  This may explain why you are using such extreme angles, but not getting as much out of the ski as you could get using ankle flex.  At the speed you are going, your transitions could be retracted instead of extended at edge change.

 

RW

 

 

 

 

I'm having trouble seeing tail wash in this video.  Certainly there are some things to be worked on, but these look like mostly arc to arc turns.

post #16 of 16

 IMHO you need to keep doing WhitePass turns until they feel normal and then start blending those back into your GS turn.

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