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Advice from a locksmith

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Advice from a locksmith: http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=520597&highlight=locksmith

"Okay, I see one of these lock threads pop up every couple of weeks here.

I am a CRL (certified registered locksmith) in Illinois. Have been for about 14 years.

I have dealt with many customers' questions after they just lost their bike to some thief. I know exactly which methods are used by thieves, and exactly which methods will actually work best on most, if not all of the locks out there.

Here are some thoughts:

You should lock your bike in accordance with:
1) Your risk of theft (crime rate in your area, or your personal paranoia)
2) Your available budget on a locking system.
3) The value of your bicycle.
4) The length of time you will be leaving your bike locked.
*Not necessarily in that order*

Most bike thefts ARE a crime of opportunity. Committed by low level thieves who carry around bolt cutters, pry bars, and/or a small jack.
**You CAN defend your bike against this type of theft with a locking system.**

SOME (very few, at least to my knowledge, in chicago) bike thefts are committed by individuals who specialize in this kind of work, have the skill, speed, tools, and know-how to steal bikes very quickly. They usually carry a variety of tools in a van and can steal, pretty much any bike they want.
**You CANNOT prevent this type of theft with ANY locking system that I have seen**

Thieves do not pick locks, they break them.

A cordless angle grinder with the right blade can and will cut through any LOCK/CABLE/CHAIN that I have seen on the market. This can be done in under five minutes per lock/cable.

So, you can't stop someone with a grinder, you can only slow them down by using multiple locks.

The best way to lock your bike for MAXIMUM security is to use this cable with this lock (links below), looping one end of the cable through your front and back wheels, around the frame, and around whatever you are locking to. Lock both ends of the cable with the padlock. They will barely fit into the shackle, but they will fit. Even more easily if you cut away the plastic covering in one small section of the eyelets to help with this.

http://www.mul-t-lockusa.com/product...=1938&catid=25

https://www.kryptonitelock.com/produ...=1001&pid=1124

Then use one or more kryptonite U locks (the best you can afford) to lock the frame and/or wheels in addition to the above lock. This is deterrence. Even hearty bike thieves will move on to another 'easier' target when they see this. The more locks that they have to break or cut through, even with a fast grinder, the better. Opportunistic thieves won't even look twice before moving on.

Multi lock brand locks MUST be purchased through a locksmith. The keyways are restricted to individual lockshops and, therefore, cannot be duplicated, even by another multi lock dealing locksmith. When you purchase a lock and keys, the key bitting(s) will be recorded by the locksmith onto a key authorization form. The only people that will ever be able to get keys to your lock will be the people named on this list. Period. You will have to return to that same lockshop, with a valid photo ID, to obtain replacement/extra keys (very handy if you lose your keys).
The lock cylinders cannot be picked, drilled, or 'bumped' open.
Very secure.

Unless you are in a very low risk area, DO NOT use combination cable locks. They are too easy to open if you know how, and it is not hard to find out.

Don't lock your bike in dark, low traffic areas, or parking garages, if it can be avoided.


With all of that being said, I use the above cable locking method, but with a kryptonite U lock EVERY time I lock my bike. I will use a secondary kryptonite U lock on the frame if I will be locking it for an extended period of time.

I hate bike thieves.
You can't stop them all, but you can stop 90% of them if you just invest a little money and lock your bike properly every time". 


Edited by WILDCAT - 3/24/2009 at 03:44 pm
post #2 of 10

i recommend a .45,but a.357 or .40 will do

post #3 of 10

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by duke walker View Post

 

i recommend a .45,but a.357 or .40 will do

 

The S&W 500 will work as well but it's not very weight weenie

post #4 of 10

I wonder if it's legal to rig your bike with a Tazer? Input the wrong code or don't input one within 15 seconds and 10,000V go through you and your precious grinder .

post #5 of 10

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by reducedfatoreo View Post

 

I wonder if it's legal to rig your bike with a Tazer? Input the wrong code or don't input one within 15 seconds and 10,000V go through you and your precious grinder .

 

I've heard more than one old-timer talk about soldering razor blades to the inside of wheel skirts on their cars, since apparently they were stolen a lot.  Pretty extreme, but I'm sure it got the job done....

post #6 of 10
post #7 of 10

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnys Zoo View Post

 

See the last one...

 

http://blog.wired.com/gadgets/2009/02/five-fantastica.html

 

shocking!

post #8 of 10

Maybe you could adapt this amazing technology to a bicycle.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRNVxHPJ0hM 

post #9 of 10

The URL contained a malformed video ID.

post #10 of 10

Weird because I can still view it.

 

How about this one?

 

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