EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Black P-Tex on a White Base - huh?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Black P-Tex on a White Base - huh? - Page 3

post #61 of 70

Very interesting.  I'm going to look into it further!

post #62 of 70


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post

 

Included in the p-tex paraffin mixture could be a volatile ingredient that out-gases while in the molten state. 


 

Somehow I don't think that the ski industry wants to add any more VOC's to the environment.

Something about Global Warming lowering snowfall amounts, and the possibilty of ingesting said VOC's when they are being off gassed.

 

Mike

post #63 of 70
Thread Starter 

Skis work fine  Couldn't ask for nicer days than Friday (Snowbird) and Saturday (Canyons).  But dang, why did everyone have to call in sick on Friday - took an hour to get up LCC.

 

All repair work held up, no missing ptex.  I pretty much missed any rocks, except when I was following a gal in a hot pink one piece and kicked up some dirt under the Super Condor lift.

post #64 of 70

This weekend was sick!  It looks like we have more coming!  Could snow off and on all week!  What a great end to the season. 

post #65 of 70

You are absolutely right!  We have to be more aware of our environment.  We have been to seminars that tell us if things continue our lower lifts may have to begin, up to, 1000 feet higher than there current position.  

The interesting thing is the different thought process in solving the problem.  You never know when an idea comes about that changes things.  That is how we got P-tex on bases in the first place.  The Montana, ski tuning machines, was the company who developed the way to attach P-tex to the core of the ski and ultimately developed a stone grinder to finish the ski manufacturing process.  Anyway... I called a few people I know who deal in these products.  They have stated the result in having P-tex hold wax is so minimal it may not be worth the effort.  It certainly is not worth any VOC's!  A lot of efforts are taking place in the development and creation of products that are less harmful on the environment and those of us who use them.  As things develop I will do my best to get this information out to all of you.

post #66 of 70

The p-tex (a ski industry brand name of high density polyethelene, a compound produced by many hundreds of manufacturers worldwide) used for repair of ski bases is pigmented if black (sometimes carbon-black, a common black pigment, not to be confused with graphite or other carbon compounds), and will have no measurable difference on atmospheric pressure thermal adhesion whether clear or pigmented unless the colour denominates some other difference in the PE makeup, the comment made by the tech regarding sticking better was curious. This concerns me more than the aesthetic, you wont have any less fun on them, the quality of repair looks good.

Of interest the black bases used on high performance race skis were indeed graphite filled and reduced friction over colder dryer snow by a small fraction and also produced a slightly harder base (irrelevant compared to a rock or the mineral suspension in the snow structure) however this material (only produced by sintering, not extrusion) is slightly harder to adhere in ski construction and harder to repair with thermal filling so noramally impractical on most skis now, so the black ski bases you see are pigmented for the same look. If this graphite filled material was actually used for repairs it would barely adhere at all.

 

 

(PS im looking for any old stone grinding machines in US/Europe if anyone can help)

 


Edited by benergy - 5/4/2009 at 09:27 am GMT
post #67 of 70

This makes a lot of sense 

Quote:
Originally Posted by benergy View Post

The p-tex (a ski industry brand name of high density polyethelene, a compound produced by many hundreds of manufacturers worldwide) used for repair of ski bases is pigmented if black (sometimes carbon-black, a common black pigment, not to be confused with graphite or other carbon compounds), and will have no measurable difference on atmospheric pressure thermal adhesion whether clear or pigmented unless the colour denominates some other difference in the PE makeup, the comment made by the tech regarding sticking better was curious. This concerns me more than the aesthetic, you wont have any less fun on them, the quality of repair looks good.

Of interest the black bases used on high performance race skis were indeed graphite filled and reduced friction over colder dryer snow by a small fraction and also produced a slightly harder base (irrelevant compared to a rock or the mineral suspension in the snow structure) however this material (only produced by sintering, not extrusion) is slightly harder to adhere in ski construction and harder to repair with thermal filling so noramally impractical on most skis now, so the black ski bases you see are pigmented for the same look. If this graphite filled material was actually used for repairs it would barely adhere at all.

 

 

(PS im looking for any old stone grinding machines in US/Europe if anyone can help)

 


Edited by benergy - 5/4/2009 at 09:27 am GMT



 

post #68 of 70
Thread Starter 

Seems odd that both graphite and carbon black are mentioned as pigments for black ptex.  In both cases, if one was using an open flame drip method, wouldn't the carbon be converted to CO2 and not make into the weld anyway?

post #69 of 70

The primary thing that happens when you burn a PTex candle is combustion of hydrocarbons. There may be some incidental combustion of carbon black ... maybe: I don't think carbon black combusts that readily - think charcoal. However, the low-temperature / incomplete combustion of the hydrocarbons actually produces carbon, so the net effect makes the PTex blacker, not clearer. Consider what happens when you light a clear (or light colored) PTex candle.

post #70 of 70

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier219 View Post

To be honest, I am not sold on the benefit of the "comprehensive" coat of p-tex.  Most of it gets belt-sanded away, but what's left does not absorb wax at all.  Personally, I'd leave the superficial scratches alone and only repair the ones that matter. 

The last sentence is the key.  Superficial stuff running along the ski is best left alone.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Black P-Tex on a White Base - huh?