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Overcanted?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Two years ago I started to mess arround with canting. Since I have no good bootfitter near I have been forced to do it all by myselfe. I settled on 1,5 deg last year and for this season I dropped it back half a degree to 1. Becasue of the feeling out on the hill and on all the videos of myself I made the conclusion that I needed more canting. I increased to 1,5 and it felt much better. However, on blue ice and WC prepared racing slopes like this weekend I was in huge problems. The gripp was so aggressive that I stood no chanse of surviving. On my first GS run I made the most spectacular wipeout of the day I was told. As I came to the steep and hooked my edges into a carve my skis rocketed forwards but me not. I was lucky I did not hurt myselfe but also becasue I passed the next gate on my back and managed to continue without any climbing. On my second run I took it very very easy and barely made it down the steep part without falling. On the flat I run at full trottle. My time was great, 3rd best in my class. Compared to my first run I felt much slower so I suspect my first run would have been at least 2-3 sec quicker (35-40sec course). Same thing happened to me last year.

 

Am I overcanted? Do you guys that race use different canting for GS and SL and also for how hard the surface is? I talked to a WC guy last fall that said he used less canting for GS and that too much canting makes your skis too aggressive. Any of you guys race on WC prepared slopes? BTW, my starting number was 96 and the track was hardly worn at all.

post #2 of 6


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

 

The gripp was so aggressive that I stood no chanse of surviving. On my first GS run I made the most spectacular wipeout of the day I was told. As I came to the steep and hooked my edges into a carve my skis rocketed forwards but me not.

 

This is a classic result from being in the back seat.  The transition from flat to steep will let you know you are too far back, often with spectacular results.  Give yourself a "push" at the top of the steeper parts to stay on top of your skis.

 

If you are over-canted, you will have a hard time skiing straight downhill on one leg -- the ski will always try to turn towards the inside edge.  You should be able to ski easily on one leg without making funny angles at the hips.

 

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post

 


 

 

This is a classic result from being in the back seat.  The transition from flat to steep will let you know you are too far back, often with spectacular results.  Give yourself a "push" at the top of the steeper parts to stay on top of your skis.

 

If you are over-canted, you will have a hard time skiing straight downhill on one leg -- the ski will always try to turn towards the inside edge.  You should be able to ski easily on one leg without making funny angles at the hips.

 

Can you describe the "push" a little bit closer please. What about the spoiler at the back of the Doberman? In or out? For the second run I put it back in and I felt a lot more balanced in the fore/aft plane.

post #4 of 6

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

 


 

.... What about the spoiler at the back of the Doberman? In or out? For the second run I put it back in and I felt a lot more balanced in the fore/aft plane.

TDK.  Interesting question. I took the spoiler out last season.  I put it back in a couple of months ago and found it a significant improvement. 

post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

 

 

TDK.  Interesting question. I took the spoiler out last season.  I put it back in a couple of months ago and found it a significant improvement. 

I have a very thin lower leg and if I remove the spoiler I have to tighten the upper buckle as far as it goes in order to keep my leg from tilting back and forth in the boot. If I have the spoiler in, 3rd buckle is enought to keep my leg snug in the boot. Also, the linear is overlapping each other in the front if spoiler is out. Its a combination of boot design and lower leg dimentsions. I have big feet (mondo 29) so the cuff is made accordingly, for me too roomy. Still the Doberman was the only performance boot where my foot fit although I had to do some streaching.
 

 

You are talking about significant improvement when spoiler was reinserted. What kind of performance? For aft balance, comfort or race track times? On my first GS I was without the spoiler and got in the back seat. In the second where spoiler was back in I did not get caught in the back seat. Last week I did the opposite. I made my first SL run with the spoiler and took it out for my second run. I was slightly quicker in the first run. Therefore no radical improvement in time without spoiler. I realize that its also a question of technique and maybe I should be more forward oriented and extending my outside leg more in order not to be dropping my butt.

post #6 of 6

TDK6,

Have you considered removing the spoiler and adding material on the outside of the tongue of the boot, or outside the liner to take up the extra space? This could provide the more upright stance without giving up proper fit and not require buckeling to the last notch on the buckel. I'm thinking use a very firm/stiff material thicker then the spoiler. To soft a material would sacrifice energy transfer to the front of the ski.

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