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Skier/Rider Code of Conduct

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

Here in the US we have the following Code of Conduct/Responsibility Code:

Quote:

Skiers/Snowboarders Responsibility Code

  1. Always stay in control and be able to stop or avoid other people or objects.
  2. People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.
  3. You must not stop where you obstruct a trail,or are not visible from above.
  4. Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.
  5. Always use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.
  6. Observe all posted signs and warnings. Keep off closed trails and out of closed areas.
  7. Prior to using any lift, you must have the knowledge and ability to load, ride and unload safely.

 

This code is endorsed by The American Ski Federation, National Ski Patrol, United States Ski Industries Association, Professional Ski Instructors of America, Cross Country Ski Areas Association, United States Ski Association, Ski Coach's Association, and other organizations.

 

In Europe they use the FIS Ski Code:

Quote:
  1. Consideration of the other Skiers: Every skier has to behave in a way he or she doesn't endanger or damage any other.
  2. Controlling of speed and way of skiing: Every skier has to ski on sight. He has to adapt his speed and way of skiing to his abilities and the conditions of the terrain, the snow and the weather and to the traffic density.
  3. Choice of track: The skier coming from behind another has to choose his track so that skiers before him won't be endangered.
  4. Overtaking: Overtaking is allowed from above or below, from right or left but always with a distance so that the skier being overtaken has space enough for all his movements.
  5. Entering and restarting: Every skier entering a trail or starting after a halt has to assure himself uphill and downhill of the fact that he can do so without danger for himself and others.
  6. Stopping: Every skier has to avoid stopping at small or blind places of a trail without need. A fallen skier has to free such a place as quick as possible.
  7. Mounting and descend: A skier mounting or descending by foot has to use the border of the trail.
  8. Pay attention to signs: Every skier has to pay attention to the marks and signs.
  9. Behavior in case of accidents: In case of accidents every skier has to help.
  10. Duty of proving identity: Every skier whether witness or involved, whether responsible or not has to prove his identity in case of an accident.

The FIS rules are not laws but are used as a basis for court decisions.

 

Looking at them, I think the FIS Ski Code is a bit more comprehensive.  Should the US adopt this as our Skier Code?

post #2 of 25

The translation of the FIS document is a bit awkward, but it is certainly more complete.  FIS items 7, 9 and 10 would be useful additions to the US code.   FIS 6 is a better exposition of the obligations in "blind spot" situations.

 

With a better translation, I would like the FIS version better.

 

 

 

 

post #3 of 25

The FIS version looks much better to me.  I'd like them to spell out number 1 even more in regards to personal responsibility and engaging in safe skiing practices.

 

BTW - I believe the U.S. version you posted is the "summary" version and not the complete code.  I think this is more complete: http://www.skimybest.com/skisafe.htm (although this may be only specifc to Colorado).

 

post #4 of 25
Thread Starter 

Noodler, good reference site.  I looked at it and it is the Colorado law concerning ski resorts.  Interesting reading.

post #5 of 25

Here is a significantly better (in my opinion) translation of the FIS code:

 

1. Respect for others. A skier must behave in such a way that he does not endanger or prejudice others.
2. Control of speed and skiing. A skier must ski in control. He must adapt his speed and manner of skiing to his personal ability and to the prevailing conditions of terrain, snow and weather as well as to the density of traffic.
3. Choice of route. A skier coming from behind must choose his route in such a way that he does not endanger skiers ahead. In other words, the skier in front/below always has priority.
4. Overtaking. A skier may overtake another skier above or below and to the right or the left, provided that he leaves enough space for the overtaken skier to make any voluntary or involuntary movement.
5. Entering and starting. A skier entering a marked run or starting again after stopping must look up and down the run to make sure that he can do so without endangering himself or others.
6. Stopping on the piste. Unless absolutely necessary, a skier must avoid stopping on the piste in narrow places or where visibility is restricted. After a fall in such a place, a skier must move clear of the piste as soon as possible.
7. Climbing and descending on foot. Whether climbing or descending on foot, the skier must keep to the side of the piste.
8. Respect for signs and markings. A skier must respect all signs and markings.
9. Assistance. At accidents every skier is duty-bound to assist.
10.Identification. Every skier and witness, whether a responsible party or not, must exchange names and addresses following an accident.

 

I agree that it is more clearly written and less ambiguous than our "Your responsibility Code." And I direct your attention in particular to #'s 3 and 4, which I think are critical.

 

#3 states clearly that "the skier coming from behind" is the burdened skier who must avoid all others. That's clearer than either or old "the downhill skier" or "the skier ahead" having the right of way. To my thinking, our code does not adequately address the responsibility of the high-speed carving skier who rips down a green run and makes a turn back uphill to collide with a struggling novice wedging down the hill. The carver was clearly "the skier coming from behind," and would undoubtedly be responsible under the FIS code, he was also the "downhill skier" at the time of the collision, and both skiers are "ahead" at that moment as well.

 

#4 states unequivocably that all skiers must avoid other skiers when overtaking--no matter what they do. Yes, it is stupid to make a sudden stop, or a sudden swerve in front of traffic. But all responsible skiers make sure that they'll be able to avoid that skier, no matter what he does on purpose or by accident. #4 completely eliminates the "he turned in front of me" excuse--as it should!

 

Best regards,

Bob


Edited by Bob Barnes - 3/20/2009 at 08:48 pm
post #6 of 25

I'd like to see a better definition of "accident". ..  Maybe "collision resulting in injury to person or property"? 

post #7 of 25

Here's a great illustrated version of the FIS Responsibility Code, from Slovenia:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I also like #6--"don't sit on your snowboard and eat wiener-schnitzel in the middle of a constricted section."

 

 

Best regards,

Bob

post #8 of 25

The FIS version is more comprehensive in general, but it has at least two defects:

 

1. Them 'Merikans don't like to read much. Too hard. Eyes glaze over in seconds. The FIS version is clearer only to people who are willing to read and understand the greater number of words. The cartoon version is a good idea, though.

 

2. The FIS version lacks any statement about preventing runaway equipment.


...and JHC is obviously one o' them 'Merikans who doesn't read...

post #9 of 25

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

 

I also like #6--"don't sit on your snowboard and eat wiener-schnitzel in the middle of a constricted section."

 

 

Best regards,

Bob

 

LOL!!! Good one Bob!!

post #10 of 25

The Skier Responsibility Code is law in Washington State:

RCW

79A.45.030

 

post #11 of 25
Quote:

 

The Skier Responsibility Code is law in Washington State

 

...and Colorado (CRS 33-44-101 to 33-44-114). Note 104 (Negligence - civil actions) and 109 (Duties of skiers - penalties) in particular.

 

And it's been adopted as law in some form in several other skiing states. Law or not, it expresses basic common sense, ethics, and etiquette everywhere!

 

Best regards,

Bob

post #12 of 25

Codes? We have codes??

Are they secret codes or can anyone have them?

Ops sorry was just practicing my Boarding (gettin ready to maybe strap one on my feet)

What was I thinking???

post #13 of 25

It really doesn't matter which set of code is implimented.

 

They're both explicit enough.

 

If you don't apply them to your own skiing, they're meaningless.

post #14 of 25

"He turned in front of me" is no excuse.  I'll second that!  If you can see them, there is no excuse.  People do have the right take up the whole run if they want to.

post #15 of 25

He turned in front of me is not an excuse, but is still the truth in some cases.  It is in your best interest to ski defensively and in a relatively predictable manner.  If you are changing lanes you should check and see if it's clear.  I like to use a driving analogy.  You don't just stop on the freeway, you pull over to the shoulder.  You check when you change lanes or merge....  etc..  If you are involved in a skier collision it doesn't really matter if it wasn't your fault.  You are still hurt.  Pay attention and you can avoid a lot of problems. 

post #16 of 25

I have been blindsided twice by skiers coming straight down the hill while I was carving super G turns across the whole hill at warp speed.

 

Many novice/intermediate skiers do not expect theis situatuion and have blamed me for skiing into them.

 

The advent of carving boards and carving skis has resulted a whole lot of new opportunities for wrecks.

 

Add a bit of alcohol to a newb and this crossing situation is a recipie for disaster.

 

I think resorts should require a review of the code before they sell a ticket.

 

post #17 of 25

I would say that if you are going to do high speed carving GS turn across the entire slope, you are setting yourself up for getting hit.  When I do that I check over my shoulder as in the apex of every turn.  It may be that the slope has too many people for everyone do just do whatever they want.  I generally ski in the fall line and have been nearly hit by novice/intermediate skiers traversing at high speed.  They/You can come out of someones peripheral vision very fast.  Like I said before it doesn't matter who hits who, you are both hurt.  Pay attention and don't rely on "the rules" to protect you.

post #18 of 25

I think its good practice for all skiers to develop a sense of situational awareness. Awareness of others on the slope, the sounds of skiers who may be approaching from behind and so forth, in order to avoid being struck. That doesn't excuse people who fail to avoid collisions with people they are approaching from above. I have an issue with the "looking over your shoulder" advice or at least reservations, inasmuch as looking over your shoulder instead of looking where you are going can, in itself, lead to accidents including collisions. "I was looking over my shoulder" is not going to be much defense if you hit someone so you have to keep your primary focus on whee you are going and anyone you may be approaching.

post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by oisin View Post

I think its good practice for all skiers to develop a sense of situational awareness. Awareness of others on the slope, the sounds of skiers who may be approaching from behind and so forth, in order to avoid being struck. That doesn't excuse people who fail to avoid collisions with people they are approaching from above. I have an issue with the "looking over your shoulder" advice or at least reservations, inasmuch as looking over your shoulder instead of looking where you are going can, in itself, lead to accidents including collisions. "I was looking over my shoulder" is not going to be much defense if you hit someone so you have to keep your primary focus on whee you are going and anyone you may be approaching.


I think this is the forgotten component of politeness in almost any activity.  Paying attention doesn't just mean paying attention to where you are going or what you are talking about, it includes paying attention to others.
post #20 of 25
I'm glad this thread got bumped.  We need a sticky here on this.  It's sad how many people do not understand the rules of the slopes, and put others in danger because of it. These rules, especially the one about overtaking, should be posted on the towers of every lift.   
post #21 of 25
I'm not sure if any other resort has this problem but my home resort does.  I agree with everyone who has said that it doesn't matter which code because they both have everything they need.  I think it falls on the shoulders of ski patrol and any other employee on the hill to know and enforce the code.  At my hill we have a lot of people who straight bomb the hill because they can't turn making them human bombs coming down the hill.  I've been hit more times then I care to count while I have been teaching and I try to find the best place to teach.  And I would agree that "changing lanes" falls on us as good skiers to be aware of whats going on up hill of us, making us just as responsible for hitting someone as the straight bombers.  I think that we need to just flat out do a better job across the board of enforcing the skier code too keep everyone safe.
post #22 of 25
I'd be happy if we could just eliminate the " trail plugs " as we say in dirtbiking . I avoid the groomers nowadays due to the number of idiots that plop down just over the crest of a hill .  And then you have to deal with a herd of boarders plopped down right at the entrance to every lift......
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post

He turned in front of me is not an excuse, but is still the truth in some cases.  It is in your best interest to ski defensively and in a relatively predictable manner.  If you are changing lanes you should check and see if it's clear.  I like to use a driving analogy.  You don't just stop on the freeway, you pull over to the shoulder.  You check when you change lanes or merge....  etc..  If you are involved in a skier collision it doesn't really matter if it wasn't your fault.  You are still hurt.  Pay attention and you can avoid a lot of problems. 

That only applies if one passes you, then turn right in front of you at the same time.  If they are below you they can, and have the right to turn wherever they want, and it might be right in front of you!  There are no "lanes" on a public trail!  Don't come up behind me because I could go any direction without warning!  It's up to you as the "above" skier to avoid me in a safe manner.   If I can't go around safely, I'll stop, and wait for a clear spot.  We all should do the same.   Am I perfect, no, it took years to learn because I was self-taught.  But it's up to the experienced to help others to learn in a nice way.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by dakine View Post

I have been blindsided twice by skiers coming straight down the hill while I was carving super G turns across the whole hill at warp speed.

 

Many novice/intermediate skiers do not expect theis situatuion and have blamed me for skiing into them.

 

The advent of carving boards and carving skis has resulted a whole lot of new opportunities for wrecks.

 

Add a bit of alcohol to a newb and this crossing situation is a recipie for disaster.

 

I think resorts should require a review of the code before they sell a ticket.

 


Me too!   Then a test!
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by oisin View Post

I think its good practice for all skiers to develop a sense of situational awareness. Awareness of others on the slope, the sounds of skiers who may be approaching from behind and so forth, in order to avoid being struck. That doesn't excuse people who fail to avoid collisions with people they are approaching from above. I have an issue with the "looking over your shoulder" advice or at least reservations, inasmuch as looking over your shoulder instead of looking where you are going can, in itself, lead to accidents including collisions. "I was looking over my shoulder" is not going to be much defense if you hit someone so you have to keep your primary focus on whee you are going and anyone you may be approaching.


Amen!  Going fast?  Look way, way ahead!
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