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another video from ESA02

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 21
I envied your last short turns on steeper terrain dchan! Very very nice, very disciplined [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]
post #3 of 21
Same pitch as Gonzo's?
post #4 of 21
Thread Starter 
didn't say it was me. [img]tongue.gif[/img]

I can only dream of turns like that for now.

DC [img]tongue.gif[/img]
post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 
Same pitch as Gonz's

I'm the video guy.
post #6 of 21
Oh, yeah! Gorgeous turns!

Come clean, anonymous skier! Who are you?!
post #7 of 21
I haven't watched it yet, but from the gushing remarks, I'll bet it's Rob Sogard. Rob's turns were AMAZING on that pitch, big angulation, round and precise.
post #8 of 21
Ahh, damn, Gonzo gave it away! I was sort of hoping to see what comes out of David's mild troll [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]

I may have said on another thread - Rob reminded me of the actor from Terminator 2 (not Arnie). Same fluid, mercury-like movements no matter what were the pitch, snow conditions, size of bumps and so on. Watching him ski ends up in a close call between being inspired to ski better and just shrugging, packing your bags and going home in the knowledge you're never gonna get there (hold your fire, just joking).
post #9 of 21
My guess was that the video was one of the coaches, but having seen none of them ski, I daren't make a guess at which one!
post #10 of 21
yeah, the best turns to see were the bottom pitch, where Rob's skiing right toward Weems's group (Weems is in the bright redorange jacket & beige pants). You could really see Rob getting out over the tips to start the next turn, and his huge angulation to keep the radius small and the edges biting cleanly. Quite a sight to see.
post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
bump. Dooley
post #12 of 21
I just printed an article from Rob Sogard regarding lifting your toes to eliminate being in the back seat.
Just curious what ski and length he was skiing in this video sequence? The skis look fairly long. The skiing speaks for itself.
post #13 of 21
Nice skiing.....but looks the same as what good skiers have been doing for years.....what's all the haggling about? The only difference I would try to make is to stay a little more square to the fall line in case you need to break the rythym and throw in a quick turn for terrain or obstacle
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally posted by roundturns:
...Just curious what ski and length he was skiing in this video sequence? ...
I believe Rob was on 6 Stars that day, but don't recall the length ...I'd guess 168, though.
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally posted by Badgerman:
...The only difference I would try to make is to stay a little more square to the fall line in case you need to break the rythym and throw in a quick turn for terrain or obstacle
Badgerman, how does being more square to the fall line allow one to react quicker?
post #16 of 21
Think about it....who has the quickest turns?
World Cup mogul skiers.....and where are their shoulders facing? I know that is the extreme, but the shoulders ending up traversing the hill limits the quickness of a move down the hill for a turn in the opposite direction. More loading of the hips with a fall line posture will give a quicker transfer to the uphill ski and quicker turn initiation.
I mean his turns were quite pretty and everything....and nice and dynamic.....but alot of times you don't have the opportunity to be so deliberate and finish every turn so nice....I think that's where a square to the fall line tact keeps you out of trouble.....steeps, powder,
bumps, trees, everywhere. Harder to get the weight leaning uphill and in the backseat when you're looking down the mountain....especially if you like a wide stance.
post #17 of 21
Badgerman - I think for the radius he was doing, if he was more square to the fall-line, he wouldn't be able pressure the skis on the top part of the turn. You can see that the snow is spraying from his skis before the fall-line & its not skidding. Your line dictates where your body is directed - if you're taking a very tight line (like WC mogul run) - then the shoulders are pretty much straight down the fall-line. If you're taking a more round line, then the shoulders are facing somewhere between the skis & fall-line (at transition).

One thing about his skiing is that it looks he's tipping his outside hand & shoulders at the start of the turn - am I wrong, does any body see that?

R.
post #18 of 21
Hunden.....I see your point
post #19 of 21
Just a quick question - after upgrading my media player I was finally able to watch this for the first time.

I notice somewhat of an abrupt up move at the the transition/start of the new turn - especially in the last sequence when he is on steeper terrain. His flexion is smooth and controlled but the extension seems abrupt. Is this a consequence of the steeps or is it a refinement he needs to work on in his otherwise great skiing? Or am I totally wrong?
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally posted by Badgerman:
Think about it....who has the quickest turns?
World Cup mogul skiers.....and where are their shoulders facing? I know that is the extreme, but the shoulders ending up traversing the hill limits the quickness of a move down the hill for a turn in the opposite direction. More loading of the hips with a fall line posture will give a quicker transfer to the uphill ski and quicker turn initiation.
I mean his turns were quite pretty and everything....and nice and dynamic.....but alot of times you don't have the opportunity to be so deliberate and finish every turn so nice....I think that's where a square to the fall line tact keeps you out of trouble.....steeps, powder,
bumps, trees, everywhere. Harder to get the weight leaning uphill and in the backseat when you're looking down the mountain....especially if you like a wide stance.
Well, Badgerman, I actually did think about it. Of course, that didn't reveal to me what you thought - so I asked.

It's been a while since I watched this video, so I pulled it up again tonight. Personally, I don't think WC mogul skiing technique is a good comparison with the turns Rob is making in this video. Maybe that's just me, but I see a different intent here.

In any event, I don't agree you need to be facing down the fall line in order to react quickly to terrain or an obstacle. I understand what you're saying about a more anticipated position ...maybe it helps, maybe it doesn't. What if instead of needing to make a turn the "other way", you need to make a "direction change" by tightening the turn you're already in? When I watch Rob ski, it looks like he has a lot of options. Seems like he could "change direction" at just about any point throughout any of those turns - either left or right.

After spending the majority of the past 30 some years skiing most everything in the fall line, I'm really enjoying experimenting and playing with different lines. I'm not finding they limit my options in anyway, but I'll keep learning ...it's fun.

Quote:
Originally posted by Badgerman:
...Harder to get the weight leaning uphill and in the backseat when you're looking down the mountain...
Really? I can't agree with that statement. I see no shortage of people on the slopes that are able (quite effortlessly it seems) to face downhill and be in the backseat ....and they're certainly "leaning uphill", even if uphill happens to be behind them!
post #21 of 21
cgeib......you may in fact be enjoying a change....but what I see is alot of people who can NOT ski the fall line.....and therefore cannot link turns down a tight chute, or even negotiate a steep even slightly bumped up run.
So maybe the fall line skiing should be emphasized over the carve craze....
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