EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Cloudveil Koven Plus- Restoring waterproofness
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cloudveil Koven Plus- Restoring waterproofness

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Does anyone know the exact protocol for restoring the DWR (durable water repellent)  coating on the Cloudveil waterproof fabric? I have a pair of Koven Plus pants that work all right, but have started to loose the DWR.  Since Cloudveil uses some kind of proprietary laminate (not GoreTex), I was wondering if the standard procedures for GoreTex garments also apply to that material. 

 

Thanks for sharing the recipes!

post #2 of 11

The DWR really just works on the outer face of the garment (not the membrane), can't imagine you would do anything different.

post #3 of 11

Typically with these types of fabrics, the repellancy is built into the fabric membrane by the way the pores are overlapped, so it is never lost.  What will get lost over time, however, is the surface repellancy, but this is more of a cosmetic issue rather than a loss of water resistance.  Even though the surface may lose its ability to bead water over time, that doesn't mean it's going to leak.

 

The most important key to maintaining surface repellancy is to keep the fabric clean.  This means the removal of dirt and oils that build up on the surface.  The best way is to use a soap or detergent that is specially designed for DWR fabrics.  Such soaps clean the fabric without leaving the residue that most regular detergents do, don't leave a fragrance behind, etc.  Set the washer for an extra rinse cycle to ensure there is no soap residue left on the fabric, and never ever use fabric softener.  In fact, if you have used fabric softener in the previous load of laundry, it's a good idea to run a load without fabric softener to ensure any residue has been cleaned out of the washer.  My favorite product for washing DWR fabrics is Nikwax Tech Wash .

 

After washing, putting the garment in the dryer for about 10 minutes will help to reactivate the surface repellancy (check the care label first, though, because sometimes the liner might not be heat safe).  This is normally all that is required to re-energize your DWR garment.  If it has seen a lot of use, however, this might not be enough to restore the surface repellancy, in which case you will want to treat it with something to give the surface a helping hand (but as I said, the waterproofness is built into the fabric membrane and whether or not the surface beads water doesn't affect it, but deep penetration of oils might).  Test the previous problem areas first by splashing some water on those areas to see if it beads (good) or whether it wets the surface (bad).  For treating the fabric after washing, a good product that is safe for waterproof laminates is Nikwax TX Direct (Wash-In or Spray-On).  The Nikwax website gives advice on which product is suitable for which fabrics, as well as how to apply it and when to use it.

 

Hope that helps.

 

UPDATE:  I just looked up the main fabric that Cloudveil uses in that garment (eVent) and the eVent website has detailed information on care and maintenance.  It's pretty much as I described above, and they also recommend Nikwax Tech Wash and TX Direct for washing and waterproofing.  They recommend drip drying, but also say heat will help to reactivate surface repellancy (a bit of a contradiction).  Ultimately they say refer to the garment manufacturers label when deciding whether to put it into the dryer; probably because some components of the garment might be susceptible to heat damage, and they have no way of knowing what the manufacturer has built into the garment.


Edited by exracer - 3/17/2009 at 05:53 am


Edited by exracer - 3/17/2009 at 05:58 am
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

 Thanks for the detailed reply, I appreciate the advice.  Are you sure Koven Plus is EVent?  I am almost positive that it is not- whatever they use is also way less breathable than eVent. 

post #5 of 11

     Quote:

Originally Posted by alexzn View Post

 

 Thanks for the detailed reply, I appreciate the advice.  Are you sure Koven Plus is EVent?  I am almost positive that it is not- whatever they use is also way less breathable than eVent. 

Cloudveil lists the main fabric as being EV3, which I assumed is a fabric made for them by eVent, but my assumption could easily be incorrect.  I assume Cloudveil must purchase their fabric from somebody else, even if the design is proprietary, and the EV designation is a bit of a clue in my mind.
 

Regardless, the technologies for breathable waterproof fabrics are similar enough that care and maintenance methods are pretty much universal.


 


Edited by exracer - 3/17/2009 at 02:40 pm


Edited by exracer - 3/17/2009 at 02:40 pm
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 

I don;t think it is eVent, eVent is a proprietary GE membrane that as far as I know has not been licensed out to be sold under any other name.  Cloudburst EV3 is a stretch fabric, so it must be a solid polymer membrane, which explains its underwhelming breathability.  I will look at Cloudveil website or instructions (should have done it at the irst place, huh?)

post #7 of 11

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post

 

I don;t think it is eVent, eVent is a proprietary GE membrane that as far as I know has not been licensed out to be sold under any other name.  Cloudburst EV3 is a stretch fabric, so it must be a solid polymer membrane, which explains its underwhelming breathability.  I will look at Cloudveil website or instructions (should have done it at the irst place, huh?)

 

I looked it up, and the Cloudveil EV3 fabric is a stretch variant of Entrant Dermizaz-EV.  The maintenance and Nikwax cleaning and care products mentioned above are appropriate.

post #8 of 11

I have a habit of getting grease on my ski clothes - presumably from chair lifts. Washing out the grease has always resulted in a loss of water repellancy, especially using some of the harsh cleaners I've had to use to get the grease out (Power Dissolver, etc.)

 

Thankfully there is Tech Wash Spray that I can spray on my gear after I get the stains out and it dries, that returns the lost water repellancy - see www.nikwax.com

post #9 of 11

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post

 

I have a habit of getting grease on my ski clothes - presumably from chair lifts. Washing out the grease has always resulted in a loss of water repellancy, especially using some of the harsh cleaners I've had to use to get the grease out (Power Dissolver, etc.)

 

A rep for Descente told me years ago that the best way to get chairlift grease/oil out of your ski clothing is to use waterless hand cleaner.  That's right, the stuff you get in a can from the hardware or automotive store (make sure it's NOT the type with pumice).  It's easy on the fabric and it get the grease/oil out like nothing else.  Once the greasy area has been cleaned (it's great for collar areas too), through it into the washing maching with Nikwax Tech Wash and you're good to go.  I've had to do this a few times, and each time the results have been fantastic.  The stuff I use is DL Permatex.

post #10 of 11

The mechanics' hand cleaner sounds like a good idea to try, though I thought it was greasy itself.

 

So far I have had my best results with Dawn Power Dissolver, which is meant for getting dirty grease messes out of pots and pans without scrubbing. The Power Dissolver works well to spot clean, and then rinse off with warm water using the spray nozzle in the sink. I have been able to get the grease out realy well without putting the whole item in the washing machine, and then restored the water repellancy to that area with the TechWash spray.

post #11 of 11

I would be very careful with the hand cleaner. They often contain lanolin or other moisturizer to keep your hands from drying out. I am sure it will also take out the black greasy spost, but it may also leave an organic film on your clothes which will impede the water resistance of your fabrics and possibly block the pores of your semipermeable membrane. On the other hand, alot of the new cleaners are citrus-based. Also be careful with those because they themselves can dissolve some plastics and such.

 

I haven't tried this, but I have been using a very good general cleaner around the house which really does a great job on grease on carpets and spots. It is sold by Griot's Garage and is called  "Interior Cleaner". It is clear and doesn't seem to damage anything I have put it on yet as a spot cleaner. I haven't tried it on my "delicates", ie ski clothes yet, but I have a feeling that it might be a good spot remover for clothes too. It seems to wash out real easy.

 

Regardless, if you use the hand cleaner, make sure you thoroughly wash it out with powder detergent. Then follow that with one of the non-residue sports washes.

 

Good luck,

Nick.


Edited by BigNick - 3/21/2009 at 04:28 am
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Cloudveil Koven Plus- Restoring waterproofness