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Best mogul practice on groomers?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Apologies for another moguls question - I'm getting ready for my trip to Les Arcs in a few weeks and want to make sure I have understood what I read here.

 

My understanding is that to one of the best ways to practice moguls is on the groomers by drilling short radius turns and rythmic pole planting.

 

My questions are:

 

1. Should it be short radius or pivot turns?

2. Should you also practice them with a down-unweighting to get the right feel for absorbing and turning on the bump?

 

Many thanks for all the great advice on this site.

Barry

post #2 of 9

Short response because my time is limited....sorry.  

 

 

1) stop any idea of rythum....moguls are not generally rythmic...you need to practice those stated skills so you own them and can call upon them as you need.    

 

2) some mogul turns can be executed "carved" and some are better executed "pivoted" on a flat ski.....(see above) so own both, practice both, interchangable.   Do 3 carved and 2 pivots, then carve, pivot, pivot, carve.....you get the idea.   

 

3) Pole plant should be ready...not rythmic.  What happens if you get out of rythumm which you will.....You may need to start "learning" your pole plants using rythum, but that is a starting place, not goal.    

 

I will add to your lesson plan.....retractions.....can go with short turns....Key in moguls.   

post #3 of 9

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazza View Post

 

Apologies for another moguls question - I'm getting ready for my trip to Les Arcs in a few weeks and want to make sure I have understood what I read here.

 

My understanding is that to one of the best ways to practice moguls is on the groomers by drilling short radius turns and rythmic pole planting.

 

My questions are:

 

1. Should it be short radius or pivot turns?

2. Should you also practice them with a down-unweighting to get the right feel for absorbing and turning on the bump?

 

Many thanks for all the great advice on this site.

Barry

 

1. you shoud know how to do both, good mogul skiing requires tactically appling skills to what ever is thrown at you.

 

2. sure you can practice short turns with retraction, its pretty hard to learn by yourself especailly with out moguls to 'assist' you.

 

3 the last thing that can work alot is the 'dolphin turn"

 

 

these are great to learn the 'leverage" aspect of out pressure control with out being moguls, and also they tend to be done as a 'retraction" move.

post #4 of 9

You can practice retraction turns by finding a ridge or spine running down the fall line such as you may find on the edge of a groomer or snowmaking trail.  Pretend the spine is the top of moguls and make turns on either side of it, transitioning over the top of the spine and feel how retracting over the spine makes turning so effortless. 

post #5 of 9

Pole plants...Have the pole ready to plant before your skis reach the fall line so you can quickly plant and turn anywhere that looks good.  The plant should be straight down the fall line from your feet, not a big swing ahead.  Reach way down the hill when planting.

 

Retraction turns...Yes!  Add a very strong pullback of both feet at the point in the turn transition when both feet are light.  Rule-of-thumb--if the ski tips are off the snow you have no control.  How does one get their ski tips down to the snow?  By this strong pullback.  This is what's shown in the dolphin turn, but I don't know of very many skiers athletic enough to do that trick.

 

Aim hips & shoulders down hill all the time.  Never allow yourself to rotate toward the hill.

 

Maintain the strong inside half with the inside pole/hand/arm/shoulder/hip high and forward.  The outside pole/hand/arm/shoulder/hip needs to be low and back.

 

Keep your balance over the outside ski with both feet rather close together.

 

Keep your balance centered fore & aft.  If you get back on your heels, either recenter with the strong pullback of the feet, or just stop and start over.

post #6 of 9

Us old folks used to work on faster  and faster shortswing turns as training for bumps.  Linking tight radius turns as fast as you can all the way down a fairly steep groomer is the basic idea.  The more turns you can crank out within a period of time or amount of ground covered, the better prepared you are for the irregular patterns you will encounter in the bumps.  Hop turns down very steep slopes also help in many of the same ways as the dolphin turns.   Both drills work to help fine tune the timing of your pole plants.  Neither is intended to simulate skiing bumps, but both will help give you the skills and reaction speed to handle them better.

post #7 of 9

As somebody who has committed to bump skiing in the past couple years...  Short-radius retraction turns are the only groomer-drill I've found that replicates the "feel" of a bump run.  I always hit a groomer and bang out a couple dozen retraction turns before heading into a bump run to get my legs "moving" again.

post #8 of 9

Depending on your definition of the word "carve" you can eather do it in the bumps or you cannot. Skip the ide of carving in the bumps or lets say skip using the word carving for pivot entry turns. Hit me on the head guys all you want but generally speaking.

 

You can practise short turns on a groomer for practise but you cannot really learn to ski bumps if there are no bumps arround. The only thing except building on general skiing skills is to scout for piles of snow or ridges or hints of bumps on worn gromers and practise "pre-turns" and "countersteering". My advice would be to wait until you get to wherever you are going and make the most of your few days of bump heaven.

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks Everyone, very useful.

 

Not sure I have the athleticism for that dolphin turn without bumps, but the principle seems very helpful.

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