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Where is the best powder? - Page 2

post #31 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post

 

Right on, that reads much better. However, doesn't Utah have the lowest water content snow? Isn't that what their dry powder is all about? Colorado snow seems to vary more widely given the more immense area that the resorts cover. I remember hearing of an empirical study that they did where the Cottonwoods snow proved to have the lowest water content, however, I'm not sure where it was done.
 


 

 

it does NOT have the lowest water quality be average. Most of the resorts in colorado get lower water quality snow.

 

Trust me when i say this lighter isnt always better. If it so light that it just blows away its dust on crust.

 

I rather ski a dense 6 inches of snow, over 12 inches of dust on crust anyday of the week,

post #32 of 55

Once you ski neck deep pow, it becomes a religion.........but I'll never say where! ...........I don't like to share my pow! Everyone keep going to Alta & Snowbird for the best pow.........REALLY! .......heh, heh...........

post #33 of 55

post #34 of 55

NICE PIC!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Has anyone ever skied in a thunder snow storm at 10k+ feet?..............IT'S SICK!!!!!!!!!!!!...........Your hair starts to tingle & crackle from the static electricity.........and it dumps like there is no tomorrow..........YEAH BABY LAUNCH OFF THOSE CORNICES!

post #35 of 55

slider, nice pic^^ !

You posted one like that last season but I thought you were going right-left in the photo.  Was it different?

post #36 of 55

niseko, japan

 

although you could probably name any resort in hokkaido (the northern island in japan). they all get unbelievably light, dry powder and it never stops snowing there!

post #37 of 55

Alta in Utah has great snow and so does Steamboat, CO. The Choogach ( I dont think i spelled that right) are supposed to have the dry stuff too

post #38 of 55

Columbia.

post #39 of 55


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by karpiel View Post

 

Columbia.


 

post #40 of 55


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jahroy View Post

 



couldn't agree more...

 

i'll take 6 inches of wet cement with 100 MPH winds over 18 inches of blower any day..

 

 

from what i've heard alyeska gets more of a maritime snow consistency.... like you'd find in the PNW or California.  in other words, the good stuff.


 

You must be in loser denial, anyone who has skied that kind of snow, wouldn't ski that shit you guys get in Tahoe...  Big/Little Cottonwood for sure....

post #41 of 55

But you see up here at powder king in northern BC. When there is 12 inches of blower over night. It's often sitting on top of the sort of kind of not really skied out at all 1-3 feet of blower from the previous few days. So it's much different than 12 inches of blower on top of hard pack.

SEE WE SKI THROUGH THE SNOW, WHILE OTHER PLACES YOU SKI ON TOP

YOUR CHOICE I SUPPOSE, ALL A MATTER OF PREFERENCE

post #42 of 55

I've lived an skied a lot of different places and I'm gonna have to go ahead and cast my vote for Eastern BC, (Monashees, Purcells, etc...)

post #43 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by david_oz View Post

 

niseko, japan

 

although you could probably name any resort in hokkaido (the northern island in japan). they all get unbelievably light, dry powder and it never stops snowing there!

 

Not the lightest pow I've ever skied (CO, probably), but definitely the most consistent, I must have had 50 plus pow days this winter.

post #44 of 55

Alta/Snowbird this last week had 65" Wed-Sat, ending with 18" on Satuday of less than 4.5% moisture content fluff, and that was on top of more than a 15-foot base that allowed you to ski everywhere.  If that is not the standard, it should be.

 

 

Report Date

24 hr New Snow

24 hr New Water

24 hr Snow Density

Storm Total

Season Cumulative Snow

Season Cumulative Water

2009-04-04

18.0

0.80"

4.44%

50.0"

615.5"

44.70"

2009-04-03

21.0

1.08"

5.14%

32.0"

597.5"

43.90"

2009-04-02

12.0

1.01"

8.42%

11.0"

576.5"

42.82"

2009-04-01

14.0

0.66"

4.71%

19.0"

564.5"

41.81"

post #45 of 55


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skiut420 View Post

 


 


 

You must be in loser denial, anyone who has skied that kind of snow, wouldn't ski that shit you guys get in Tahoe...  Big/Little Cottonwood for sure....


 

I gather irony is lost on you.

post #46 of 55

On K-12 dude.  Where else.

"This is pure snow! It's everywhere! Have you any idea of what the street value of this mountain is?"  (Charles De Mar)

 

Not only does it have the best powder, but if you ski it, there are side benefits:

"You ski the K-12 dude, and girls will go sterile just looking at you!"  (Charles De Mar)
 

post #47 of 55

Alta/Snowbird really are great places with fantastic snow. Problem is, by noon it's all skied off unless you hike a ways or know some stashes. If you're looking for a combination of great powder and lack of lift lines: Grand Targhee, WY (albeit generally flat) and Big Sky/Moonlight Basin (not nearly the snowfall as the above mentioned resorts).

post #48 of 55

Hokkaido, certainly oodles of snow, and fairly dry at that. It's the waist deep, face shots type of snow.

Utah / CO / NM, really dry stuff, I'd give the edge to Utah for the amount and terrain, NM ranks up there, but it's been pretty hit-and-miss with the snow in recent years.

Iran, heard that's pretty good snow-wise, bit like Utah in terms of setting and elevation.

 

post #49 of 55

Maybe you have the wrong gear or just can't ski anything but perfect powder..

 

With modern skis, I'll take quality over quality.  I've lived in Colorado, BC, the alps, and skied plenty of powder in all of them, but the PNW is where the volume is.  Mt. Baker would be my vote.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skiut420 View Post


 


 

You must be in loser denial, anyone who has skied that kind of snow, wouldn't ski that shit you guys get in Tahoe...  Big/Little Cottonwood for sure....



 

post #50 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

Maybe you have the wrong gear or just can't ski anything but perfect powder..

 

With modern skis, I'll take quality over quality.  I've lived in Colorado, BC, the alps, and skied plenty of powder in all of them, but the PNW is where the volume is.  Mt. Baker would be my vote.



 


My question is, why would I want to ski anything but perfect powder, thats the exact reason I don't ski that shit you guys get in the Pacific Northwest...  Quality is the only thing that matters when it comes to snow, my skis are Head Supermojo 105's by the way, and I'm positive they could slay that crap you get in Oregon...
 

post #51 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skiut420 View Post

 


My question is, why would I want to ski anything but perfect powder, thats the exact reason I don't ski that shit you guys get in the Pacific Northwest...  Quality is the only thing that matters when it comes to snow,

 

Quality isn't the only thing if there isn't any snow.  I've seen more days of semi permanent high pressure parked over the Rockies than I care to talk about.  Sure, Rocky Mtn powder can be great, when it actually snows. I lived there 12 years and every third year was a drought.  Then spring comes and it all melts.  Even on a bad year we get more snow,  Last week it was 2 degrees here, and waist deep.

 

Quote:

my skis are Head Supermojo 105's by the way, and I'm positive they could slay that crap you get in Oregon...

 

Hmmm.... so it isn't the gear...Maybe a lesson would help. 

 

Anyway, by all means, stay in the Rockies.  None of our snow is worth skiing.

 



 

 


Edited by newfydog - 4/10/2009 at 08:39 pm GMT
post #52 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

With modern skis, I'll take quality over quality.  

 


For me it's the exact opposite. 
 

post #53 of 55

I think the OP's question refers to how the snow feels and works for him on a day's skiing, and that he wants the classic powder day feeling: floating, smooth, quiet.

 

This is different from deciding where to buy a season pass (quantity and dependability).

 

It's not just where you go but how you go. For what you want, you have to watch the weather carefully and be ready to get there in a maximum 24-48 hour window.

 

Answering: take a line north/ south from Utah into Canada and pick anywhere.

post #54 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

With modern skis, I'll take quality over quality.   


I think I meant quantity over quality.  Thanks to all who overlooked me sounding like like a moron.

 

Of course, both is not so rare:

 


 

post #55 of 55

The best is anywhere I am skiing face shots.

 

Whitewater BC.  Not just great snow and good terrain, but a really cool vibe too.  Kind of like doing Alta in the days of Alf and Junior.  Lots of light snow at the head of a canyon, near a really big lake;  sound familiar.  It doesn't get all skied out in the 1st hour either, please do not tell anybody else though.

 

Great powder skiing is as much about the culture of a place as the snow.  If you are the only powder hound in groomer ville it is just not as much fun.

 

Alyeska, skied there for many years.  LOTS of snow and at the base you will get lots of rain. Base elevation is about 100', and you are about a 5 minute drive from the Pacific Ocean.  At the top you will get a lot of snow, it is good but quality is not the Rockies.  If you catch a copter it is all that you see in the movies kids, it is huge and the snow will be better with the elevation.

 

 

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