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Why Don't More Skiers Take (or Take More) Ski Instruction? - Page 18

post #511 of 571

I can't belive I'm posting in an old thread of 500 posts!

 

But anyway, I live in the same city as NYCJIM. I do manage to ski AT LEAST 15 days, though not a great deal more than that. So it's quite possible to achieve, as evident by sibhusky's great record while living in the same general area. Though in the majority of the cases, I'd say a "casual skier" don't usually do much more than that.  

Anything less than 10 though, I'd not even call it "casual". Just an occasional or once a year skier.

 

15 days is basically 2 weeks. Or 5 long weekends (and there're at least 4 of those in each winter, or 6 for the hardcore). By mixing and matching those long and short trips, most of us who're half way into skiing can one way or another get that number in most years. My number-of-days only gone up after I allocated 2 trips out west instead of the usual 1 trip a season. That unfortunately comes with drawbacks... So not everyone is in a position to do that.

post #512 of 571

Ski days while living in central NJ, holding down a more than full time job, and raising my daughter.  Most of this was at Camelback, although each year I think I took a ski trip in the spring to somewhere in the Rockies. 

 

Actual  
89-90: 25
90-91: 32
91-92: 36
92-93: 41
93-94: 28
94-95: 36
95-96: 41
96-97: 40
97-98: 37
98-99: 32
99-00: 29
00-01: 54
01-02: 36
02-03: 36
post #513 of 571

Crazy that you guys know how many days you got out in 1989. I'm relatively sure that I got 4 days last week. Before that I have to speculate.

post #514 of 571

My family makes fun of me, I admit.  It all started when some guy I worked with told me his 10 days out west a year added up to more skiing than my season in the Poconos.  He claimed to ski 40,000 feet a day and told me I couldn't wrack up that kind of footage in a whole season in the Poconos because the hills were too short.  The rest is history. 

 

I track footage, which equipment I used, the "amortized price" of the lift ticket, comments on weather, etc.  It gets to be more stuff every year.  (I figured out, for instance, that I had 399 days on my last pair of boots before I went to buy a new pair.  The guy in the shop couldn't believe it.) 

 

It's actually been helpful here, though, to be able to tell people that, usually, x dates of the year have x conditions.  Since I've got history about my days here in Montana, I can look back and tell from my comments and which equipment was used what was going on during a particular period. 

post #515 of 571


 

Quote:
View Post


Hah, try to get 15 days in at a mountain 4 hours from your home and then come back and say that.

 



I live 4 1/2 hours from my mountain and got in 58 days last year.  It would've been more except I had to sit a few weeks out due to an injured leg.  I drove back from Killington last night ... a long drive but worth it.

 

Edit:  I live in Westchester County, about 30 minutes north of NYC.  There are folks from Long Island (farther by road to skiing than NYC) who make the Vermont pilgrimage weekly from opening day to closing day.  They're real diehard skiers.

post #516 of 571

Well, clearly some ski more than others, and those living in Colorado, Utah have double long ski seasons compared to New York City's options.   Here the Catskill Mountains have ten weeks of good snow for the season.

 

Anybody from New York City who skis practically every weekend in the winter is someone who skis "a lot."  It's ludicrous to think that I'm not skiing a lot when I'm going every weekend.  Methinks also that people are exaggerating about the number of days?  Kind of like a urinating contest?  LOL  Oh yeah, my dick is 8 inches!  My credit score is 850.  I never carry a credit card balance.  I caught a fish this big.  Jeesh, the outright lies people tell.  

 

Back to the original topic:  I think to ski is kind of expensive.  To then add a lesson on top of that cost when one already knows how to ski is not something somebody is going to do.

 

post #517 of 571
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCJIM View Post

Well, clearly some ski more than others, and those living in Colorado, Utah have double long ski seasons compared to New York City's options.   Here the Catskill Mountains have ten weeks of good snow for the season.

 

Anybody from New York City who skis practically every weekend in the winter is someone who skis "a lot."  It's ludicrous to think that I'm not skiing a lot when I'm going every weekend.  Methinks also that people are exaggerating about the number of days?  Kind of like a urinating contest?  LOL  Oh yeah, my dick is 8 inches!  My credit score is 850.  I never carry a credit card balance.  I caught a fish this big.  Jeesh, the outright lies people tell.  

 

Back to the original topic:  I think to ski is kind of expensive.  To then add a lesson on top of that cost when one already knows how to ski is not something somebody is going to do.

 



th_dunno-1[1].gif   I dunno.  I ski ~60 days a year and live in the NYC metro area.  I train myself a few hours every non-powder ski day.  But that's not enough to become the skier I want to be as quickly as I want to get there, so I pay $$$ for lessons.   To wit, I am paying to take an instructional ski week in Colorado this month and one in Austria in April.  I am also paying for a few days of private lessons with an elite skier this spring.  I am pleased with the return of my previous instruction investments and expect a strong return on this season's investments.

post #518 of 571
Quote:

Edit:  I live in Westchester County, about 30 minutes north of NYC.  There are folks from Long Island (farther by road to skiing than NYC) who make the Vermont pilgrimage weekly from opening day to closing day.  They're real diehard skiers.


Man, you're not kidding. I see those people every weekend. Hats off to them!

post #519 of 571

NYCJim, I don't think most of us are lying to you, we really don't care enough what you think to bother.  I have the log to back up my claims.  And as to trying to impress people here - the number of days I ski isn't very impressive, it's HOW I ski that's impressive, and I am the first to admit that my skiing is NOT impressive.  But after I ski 70 or 80 days this year maybe it finally will be.

 

As a former music teacher (and I understand you're a teacher too) I know that practicing a couple of times a week for 10 weeks a year isn't going to make a very good musician.  Do you think your students would learn much with that amount of schooling?  We ski a lot because we need to - and because we can.

 

10 week season?  My eastern season is about 4 months long, that is about 17 weeks.

post #520 of 571


 

Quote:

Originally Posted by NYCJIM View Post

 

Anybody from New York City who skis practically every weekend in the winter is someone who skis "a lot."   

 

NYC metro is tough.  Not too much worse than Boston, though, or even Denver.

 

Quote:
It's ludicrous to think that I'm not skiing a lot when I'm going every weekend. 

 

It's all relative.  15 days a year is not a huge number.  You're certainly not even going every weekend day that your local ski areas are open, for instance.

 

Quote:
Methinks also that people are exaggerating about the number of days?

 

Getting much more than 50 days a year is tough if you don't live real close to where you ski, and/or you work a regular job.  Even if you figure a 16-20 week season, you've gotta be skiing at least 3 or 4 days a week every week, plus a week or two of ski vacation.  I was over 50 days last year, at least if you count a few hours of night skiing after work as a "day".  Working part-time as an instructor helps pad the numbers, since for me that guarantees being out there at least 3 days a week...

post #521 of 571
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCJIM View Post

...

 

Back to the original topic:  I think to ski is kind of expensive.  To then add a lesson on top of that cost when one already knows how to ski is not something somebody is going to do.

 



They'll do it, but again you need value.  You're actually correct that for a 15 day/year skier, any lesson will probably be wasted even if they get a great instructor with a good eye and, if the more-common scenario of a group lesson, a group of students that's not a complete cluster.  If they don't care about getting better technically and just want to pay someone for focused attention plus maybe a little social interaction with peers (a common reason that adults take lessons, for everything from languages to piano to skiing), well, most ski schools and instructors do a lousy job on that front, too.  Then there is the gravity traverse factor...not limited to skiing btw, I had an out-of-body experience relating to g-outs in the context of mountain biking, too.

 

The good news is that instructors who, for instance, both try to be personable with every student and maintain a mailing list that they actually work with useful info as part of the process, and can actually ski, can do real well as a result. 

post #522 of 571
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCJIM View Post

Well, clearly some ski more than others, and those living in Colorado, Utah have double long ski seasons compared to New York City's options.   Here the Catskill Mountains have ten weeks of good snow for the season.

 

Anybody from New York City who skis practically every weekend in the winter is someone who skis "a lot."  It's ludicrous to think that I'm not skiing a lot when I'm going every weekend.  Methinks also that people are exaggerating about the number of days?  Kind of like a urinating contest?  LOL  Oh yeah, my dick is 8 inches!  My credit score is 850.  I never carry a credit card balance.  I caught a fish this big.  Jeesh, the outright lies people tell.  

 

Back to the original topic:  I think to ski is kind of expensive.  To then add a lesson on top of that cost when one already knows how to ski is not something somebody is going to do.

 


No matter how you slice it, 15 days a year is not " a lot". I have about that many days already this season. And yes, I have a full time M-F job; and it takes me an hour to get to skiing.

 

I can't keep track of how many days each year - ion part because I don't care too much and because I always lose track. But my season looks like this: 10 to 20 days "preseason" skiing up on the glaciers; EVERY weekend day from mid November to the end of April; all of the winter holidays except Christmas and Thanksgiving, a week at Christmas and 2 weeks in February or March; another 10 - 20 "post season" hikes; 4 or 5 days down at Timberline in the summer. I would have to say that the majority of my friends spend a whole bunch of their lives on the snow. There's no pissing contest in that; it's just what it is.

 

You can add that up if you care. Too much work for me. Granted it would be a lot harder to get a full season in living in NYC...that's why I don't live there. I'm a skier, not "someone who skis".

 

15 days a season is a casual skier. Frankly, it seems to me that you should be more inclined to spend at least 1 of those days in a clinic or a private lesson to make the most of your limited days on the snow. However, I understand that many people view skiing more as a pastime than as a lifetime. For those people, knowing "how to ski" may be enough.

post #523 of 571

NYCJIM, you do seem to have a bit of tunnel vision. If you don't or can't do something, you seem to think no one else (in similar situation) can't either?

 

I live IN New York City, Manhattan to be exact. How much easier for me than is for you to go skiing?

 

There're minimum of 4 3 day weekends in the winter: Christmas, New Year, MLK day, President's day. If one skis all 4, that's 12 days right there. (hat's not counting Easter, when some of us gets the Friday off :) ) Most of the people I ski with do at least 3 of those 4 long weekends, if not all 4 of them. Add a couple of weekends in between, you'll be up and above 15!

 

Your problem is doing only single day trips. It's a long day from the city to the Catskills. You're totaly exhausted at the end of the day and in no mood to do another one back to back. Much better to stay over Saturday night and ski 2 days for the 5 hours trips.

 

Last season, I did about 10 in the east (since I had 7 free tickets from my Descente jacket and did a couple of "flex days" at Bellearye/Plattekill), and 15 more out west. It's pretty high for me. I had basically no life in the winter outside of skiing due to these trips. I plan to cut back on the travel and ski more locally. Though I don't think the number of days would change all that much.

 

One of the biggest mistake I see Metro NY skiers make is to think because there's no snow at the street of Manhattan, there's no snow on the mountains! In many years, I got more skiing in in April than I get in January!

post #524 of 571


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

My family makes fun of me, I admit.  It all started when some guy I worked with told me his 10 days out west a year added up to more skiing than my season in the Poconos.  He claimed to ski 40,000 feet a day and told me I couldn't wrack up that kind of footage in a whole season in the Poconos because the hills were too short.  The rest is history. 

 

I track footage, which equipment I used, the "amortized price" of the lift ticket, comments on weather, etc.  It gets to be more stuff every year.  (I figured out, for instance, that I had 399 days on my last pair of boots before I went to buy a new pair.  The guy in the shop couldn't believe it.) 

 

It's actually been helpful here, though, to be able to tell people that, usually, x dates of the year have x conditions.  Since I've got history about my days here in Montana, I can look back and tell from my comments and which equipment was used what was going on during a particular period. 



Guys like "that guy" are generally the worst skiers on the planet. Even if they are not they are from the best and dont get "it". 

 

I use to hate that teaching at snowbird that a parent couldnt understand why their kid "who skis all the time out west" and they would go on to name all these ritzy but not particularly difficult resorts, couldnt be in the same group as the every weekend kid from noname east coast mountains.

 

post #525 of 571

I didn't think anybody was trying to impress me.  I just think generally people have a tendency to publicly proclaim themselves better than they actually are.  No need for anybody to think I was singling them out.  I'm just making a general observation about human behavior.  

 

I think if a person is committed to learning, that they can excel even with relatively fewer days on the mountain.

 

For example, I consider myself highly motivated to learn skiing and to improve.  And with an average of about 10 skiing days for each of those 8 winters I can honestly say I ski very well.  I'm a mogul beginner but I'm getting better at them.  And I usually am skiing the single and double blacks with confidence and control.  About 80% of the skiers are on the greens and blues.  I can't count the number of times I'll be skiing down a diamond trail thinking that it was worth it to get good at skiing because I get to ski where there are no crowds.

 

Also if a skier is committed to improving and focused on a specific skill to improve, say for example a quick short turn, and he practiced that for two consecutive days or even one long day, the improvement results can be astonishing.  So 50 days on skis a season vs. 15 does not necessarily mean that the 50 day skier is better.

 

I guess my point is that it's not how many days you'll need to learn to improve.  It's what you're doing on those days.  I believe I ski more days than most people--but not more than most who are "diehard" skiers.  It really is relative.  In New York City, if you said to somebody that every winter you ski about 15 times, I don't think anybody would have any other reaction than, 'You like skiing a lot."  Then again, if I said it to a group of diehard skiers, that apparently is nothing.

 

 

 

  

post #526 of 571

Jim, no offense, but while you might be better than the 80% of the people who ski on the greens and blues, you do have tunnel vision about a few topics. First, if you were "highly motivated to improve", you would be balking about lessons being too expensive. Secondly, practice does not make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect. In other words, skiing short turns without feedback from a qualified eye is not going to get you to greatness. The difference between "good skiing" and "great skiing" is really damn hard to accomplish. You can't see yourself ski, and if you could, would you know whether that long leg bracing, scissoring, or turning out of the wrist is holding you back from being able to ski bumps with confidence and ease?

 

And so, good skiing is relative as well. For you, being able to ski black runs makes you good compared to the ones who can't. To Kjetil Aamont, good skiing is an olympic podium. If you're satisfied with your skiing, fine. If you are "motivated to improve", good instruction will make a difference.

post #527 of 571



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by iWill View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCJIM View Post

Well, clearly some ski more than others, and those living in Colorado, Utah have double long ski seasons compared to New York City's options.   Here the Catskill Mountains have ten weeks of good snow for the season.

 

Anybody from New York City who skis practically every weekend in the winter is someone who skis "a lot."  It's ludicrous to think that I'm not skiing a lot when I'm going every weekend.  Methinks also that people are exaggerating about the number of days?  Kind of like a urinating contest?  LOL  Oh yeah, my dick is 8 inches!  My credit score is 850.  I never carry a credit card balance.  I caught a fish this big.  Jeesh, the outright lies people tell.  

 

Back to the original topic:  I think to ski is kind of expensive.  To then add a lesson on top of that cost when one already knows how to ski is not something somebody is going to do.

 


No matter how you slice it, 15 days a year is not " a lot". I have about that many days already this season. And yes, I have a full time M-F job; and it takes me an hour to get to skiing.

 

I can't keep track of how many days each year - ion part because I don't care too much and because I always lose track. But my season looks like this: 10 to 20 days "preseason" skiing up on the glaciers; EVERY weekend day from mid November to the end of April; all of the winter holidays except Christmas and Thanksgiving, a week at Christmas and 2 weeks in February or March; another 10 - 20 "post season" hikes; 4 or 5 days down at Timberline in the summer. I would have to say that the majority of my friends spend a whole bunch of their lives on the snow. There's no pissing contest in that; it's just what it is.

 

You can add that up if you care. Too much work for me. Granted it would be a lot harder to get a full season in living in NYC...that's why I don't live there. I'm a skier, not "someone who skis".

 

15 days a season is a casual skier. Frankly, it seems to me that you should be more inclined to spend at least 1 of those days in a clinic or a private lesson to make the most of your limited days on the snow. However, I understand that many people view skiing more as a pastime than as a lifetime. For those people, knowing "how to ski" may be enough.


 

 NYCJIM - Life is what you make of it.

 

To improve, one needs a lot of back to back ski days.

 

Priorities - set them properly and you can get as many ski days as you want.

 

My son is in the NYC public school system, one of those academic HS. He skied 45 days last year (days on skis only - not including traveling days). Most weekends in Killington, VT and 3 trips out west . No early season - just December to end of April. Missed a couple of weekends in January. So, if you are a teacher - you have the same schedule he does, so you too can do the same numbers of days. It's all in your priorities. To paraphase Warren Miller - 'Want your ski days - go get it'. 

 

 

 

BTW, I logged 81 days last season. Haven't started this season yet.

Next weekend will be my first day on skis and it pick up quite quick after that. I have schedule 54 ski days by 02/06/2011. After that it gets all fuzzy.

 

post #528 of 571

Just to chime in here, it's easy to improve as a beginner, a bit more difficult as an intermediate, and really tough as an advanced/expert skier.  I don't think I'm a particularly good example as I appear to be a very slow learner, but the issues I'm having in my skiing tend to be pretty subtle and difficult to change.  I ski at least 40 days a winter, and take lessons at least 15 days out of that.

 

I don't understand anyone who doesn't think they can learn something from taking lessons.  I've found it particularly helpful to have regular coaches who know my skiing and can help me progress. 

 

Mike

post #529 of 571

It's been said many times. Pratice doesn't make perfect, pratice make permanent. So if you start with the wrong technique, all the praticing is making that harder to correct later on.

 

Sadly, I myself made the same mistake of thinking I didn't need no boring expensive lessons. Well, I'm now seeing what I did wrong all those years. I so wish I didn't have to make all those "detour" in technique all those years back.

 

The stuff I'm skiing now, I could have skied them in my 5th season had I taken good lessons with good instructors. Instead, I have to first un-learn what I did wrong, and re-learn what it should be. Then, I'll pratice them in different conditions so they become second nature without acquiring all those bad habits along the way that I need to un-learn later on.

 

But as a beginer, or an "improving" intermediate, it's a hard sell to get them to lessons. The natural progression on snow make them think they're already making good progress. It's really difficult to get them to realize how much more they could improve by taking lessons.

post #530 of 571

Very insightful comments from everybody here.  Yes, although I know the reason why most won't take lessons, I personally do!

 

It's true, that practice makes permanent, or perfect practice makes perfect.

 

post #531 of 571

I think many have a misconception about the costs. I've never had a problem scoring cheap lessons. Some hotels will bundle them in free with your room if you look around. Taos has ski weeks, which are unbelievably cheap, where you can get your whole family 6 days of half-day lessons and lift tickets for less than what many mountains charge for just lift tickets. Lessons in the morning, ski with your friends/family all afternoon.

 

Since I often go on my ski trips alone, I've taken lessons all but a few days that I've ever skied. Even when I do ski with friends, I like to at least squeeze in a couple half-day lessons somewhere along the trip. Not to sound cocky, but I'm pretty sure this is the reason I am a better skier than most of my friends. I still have a long way to go, but lessons have definitely helped me have a helluva lot more fun on the slopes than some of my terrified gaper friends who somehow have skied just as many days as I have, but can barely conquer the greens. I can't believe there are people who snowplow after multiple days of skiing. Spending your vacations snowplowing and scared is not a good way to spend your free time. I, too, am shocked more people aren't interested in lessons. It seems that it would help them have way more fun in the long run.

post #532 of 571

Folks might be more inclined to take instruction if they would do it as a fun group activity with friends/acquaintances.  This will be the sixth year that a group of 20+ folk from the eastern half of the US start off the ski season by going to Jay Peak, Vermont in mid-December on a very reasonable 5-day group package that includes 4 two-hour group lessons along with lodging, meals, and lift tickets.  Many of us are NASTAR junkies and take advantage of Jay's racing instruction, but most everyone takes advantage of some form of group lessons to shake off the rust with people they know and get improvement pointers at the beginning of the east coast season. The only trick here is having a reliable leader willing to organize it all.

post #533 of 571

For me it really is cost.  I'm a poor grad student with an expensive hobby, so adding an extra $50-100 to a ski day means a lot to me.  Most pertinently, it means that I might have a day less on the hill.  As for ski days, I don't get nearly as many as some people here or as many as I'd like (which again comes down to cost as I live 3 hours or so from the mountain and can either do day trips or - this years plan - sleep in my car), but that wouldn't really dissuade me from taking lessons.  I'm planning on taking a few this year, but would probably take notably more if they were half as expensive.

post #534 of 571

It's a tough call. Money for lesson vs. one more day on the hill.
 

I know a lot of people would naturally think an extra day on the hill is a lot more fun. The reality is a bit more complicated.

 

A good lesson can take a struggling, or even an improving skier to a higher level faster. So your enjoyment on ski will be that much greater. It's almost like you got 5 days on a scale of 6 vs 6 days on a scale of 5. The 5 days at a higher level actually feels more fun than having that extra day...

 

The majority of beginer skiers only take lessons when they perceive they're not "making progress". So by the time they got to upper intermediate level, most stop taking lessons, believing they're getting as much out of skiing as possible at their level anyway. There's not a lot of motivation to improve further. And it's not easy to impart the impression you can enjoy skiing sooooooo much more when you're a better skier!

 

For me, since passed the stage of struggling intermediate level, the improvement came much slower. On the other hand, with each significant improvement, the enjoyment is also enhanced much, much more. So for me, I don't hesitate to take more lesson, at the expense of my limited free skiing days. I have my past experience to tell me it'll be more than worth it!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcusBrody View Post

For me it really is cost.  I'm a poor grad student with an expensive hobby, so adding an extra $50-100 to a ski day means a lot to me.  Most pertinently, it means that I might have a day less on the hill.  As for ski days, I don't get nearly as many as some people here or as many as I'd like (which again comes down to cost as I live 3 hours or so from the mountain and can either do day trips or - this years plan - sleep in my car), but that wouldn't really dissuade me from taking lessons.  I'm planning on taking a few this year, but would probably take notably more if they were half as expensive.

post #535 of 571

I think I'm at the upper intermediate choke point that you describe.  I know I can get a lot better, but it's hard for me to imagine having more fun than I do already.  Thankfully for my skiing, I'm also competitive and have two brothers that are currently better skiers than me and that can't stand.  So, even if it wouldn't let me have more fun on the hill, I'm definitely up for taking some lessons and seeing where it takes me.  My goal is to make sure that I progress to the level that I can confidently ski all snow conditions on steep terrain without worrying about falling before the time when my body starts to make me really worry about falling...
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post

It's a tough call. Money for lesson vs. one more day on the hill.
 

I know a lot of people would naturally think an extra day on the hill is a lot more fun. The reality is a bit more complicated.

 

A good lesson can take a struggling, or even an improving skier to a higher level faster. So your enjoyment on ski will be that much greater. It's almost like you got 5 days on a scale of 6 vs 6 days on a scale of 5. The 5 days at a higher level actually feels more fun than having that extra day...

 

The majority of beginer skiers only take lessons when they perceive they're not "making progress". So by the time they got to upper intermediate level, most stop taking lessons, believing they're getting as much out of skiing as possible at their level anyway. There's not a lot of motivation to improve further. And it's not easy to impart the impression you can enjoy skiing sooooooo much more when you're a better skier!

 

For me, since passed the stage of struggling intermediate level, the improvement came much slower. On the other hand, with each significant improvement, the enjoyment is also enhanced much, much more. So for me, I don't hesitate to take more lesson, at the expense of my limited free skiing days. I have my past experience to tell me it'll be more than worth it!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcusBrody View Post

For me it really is cost.  I'm a poor grad student with an expensive hobby, so adding an extra $50-100 to a ski day means a lot to me.  Most pertinently, it means that I might have a day less on the hill.  As for ski days, I don't get nearly as many as some people here or as many as I'd like (which again comes down to cost as I live 3 hours or so from the mountain and can either do day trips or - this years plan - sleep in my car), but that wouldn't really dissuade me from taking lessons.  I'm planning on taking a few this year, but would probably take notably more if they were half as expensive.


 
post #536 of 571

I ski anything on the mountain, although my form is not always perfect. I like to stick to blacks and double blacks. But I only ski 10-12 days a year. If I was able to ski more I would probably seek instruction to improve my form (staying out of the backseat, moguls, etc.).

 

As it stands now, however, I don't want to spend a day or two getting instruction when my time on the mountain is really limited. I like to be able to go do what I want at full speed and not stop an hour for lunch biggrin.gif

post #537 of 571

To me it's very strange that people don't take lessons regularly. But maybe that's just my background as a rider and golfer where it has been "the norm" for me that people take lessons because if you just do it on your own you'll develop an interesting set of "faults" in your performance that are really difficult to get rid of.

 

It really dawned me how much lessons are a "beginners only" thing when I went to get a lesson ex tempore in a strange resort. I'm there at their office with boots and helmet on and ask if there happens to be a possibility for a private lesson in a few hours. First question: "Have you skied before?" I can kind of understand that, maybe I came, put my gear on and noticed that it isn't as easy as it looks on tv or youtube and these wide stiff things don't work the same way xc skis do. I answered that I'm a decent skier. The next question was: "So you can do a snowplow turn in both directions?"

post #538 of 571

I also don't know if everyone understands just how fun lessons for advanced skiers can be. I think people picture lessons being these big groups of beginners, snow plowing all day, so once they get to a comfortable level, they usually don't bother taking lessons anymore.

 

I usually take the highest level classes any given resort offers. What does this mean? Small classes, usually just a couple of folks, and sometimes just me! (cheap private lesson!) The instructors often seem to have fun showing us their favorite spots on the mountain, and we get a nice grand tour of the best the mountains have to offer. It always seems like the instructors themselves have more fun with these classes, which in turn makes us have more fun. To me, it's always been an easy way to ski with a group of the same skill level, while getting great coaching along the way. I've made new friends, met some great folks, and for me, it's infinitely enhanced my skiing experience. I love that my skiing improves quite noticeably with every trip I take, and thankfully have yet to see much of a plateau in my skill level, thanks to all of the great instruction I've received.

 

Are you skiing with a bunch of friends/family who stink, and you're in the mood to charge the steeps/trees/bumps/etc? Ditch them for just a couple hours, and take a class! You'll get to meet back up with everyone for lunch. ;)

post #539 of 571

Thank You for pointing this out!  I promise that a lesson with me is more fun and rewarding than skiing alone or unguided.  Most of my students comment that they skied stuff well that they wouldn't have thought they could do and in places that they wouldn't have thought to look.  My primary teaching assignment is group uppers.  I teach levels 7-9 in a small group format, never more than 4 students.  It is soooo FUN!  More skiing...  Less Talking!!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinFromSA View Post

I also don't know if everyone understands just how fun lessons for advanced skiers can be. I think people picture lessons being these big groups of beginners, snow plowing all day, so once they get to a comfortable level, they usually don't bother taking lessons anymore.

 

I usually take the highest level classes any given resort offers. What does this mean? Small classes, usually just a couple of folks, and sometimes just me! (cheap private lesson!) The instructors often seem to have fun showing us their favorite spots on the mountain, and we get a nice grand tour of the best the mountains have to offer. It always seems like the instructors themselves have more fun with these classes, which in turn makes us have more fun. To me, it's always been an easy way to ski with a group of the same skill level, while getting great coaching along the way. I've made new friends, met some great folks, and for me, it's infinitely enhanced my skiing experience. I love that my skiing improves quite noticeably with every trip I take, and thankfully have yet to see much of a plateau in my skill level, thanks to all of the great instruction I've received.

 

Are you skiing with a bunch of friends/family who stink, and you're in the mood to charge the steeps/trees/bumps/etc? Ditch them for just a couple hours, and take a class! You'll get to meet back up with everyone for lunch. ;)

post #540 of 571
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skise View Post


It really dawned me how much lessons are a "beginners only" thing when I went to get a lesson ex tempore in a strange resort. I'm there at their office with boots and helmet on and ask if there happens to be a possibility for a private lesson in a few hours. First question: "Have you skied before?" I can kind of understand that, maybe I came, put my gear on and noticed that it isn't as easy as it looks on tv or youtube and these wide stiff things don't work the same way xc skis do. I answered that I'm a decent skier. The next question was: "So you can do a snowplow turn in both directions?"


There is definitely a pyramid of instruction, with the majority being at level 1 and tapering off radically above a level 3. I teach mostly level 3-4 skiers in walk-ins; it's rare to get a level 5 or 6 class with more than 2 students. Even at the 3-4 levels we get maybe 3 students on average.

 

The questions asked of clients to sign them up however, are usually a progression from "Have you skied before?" upward. Rather than asking what level a skier is at, a set of questions is used to sort upward until you fit the client into the appropriate group.

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