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Skiing The REAL Bumps?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Several of the recent topics on moguls have me wondering.

When I look at the montages posted by B.B. etc. I see demonstrations by good skiers skiing in what looks to be most delightful conditions. Usually from the side view or from down hill. A couple of the sequences show nice fat lazy troughs in soft snow.
I always wish I were there when the photos were made.

When I start down one of the "REAL" bump runs here, I see from the uphill pespective, what also looks to be "useful bumps", sometimes.
After I make that first turn, and I get into these same runs, I am more often greeted with bumps that are boat-tailed on the downhill aspect, hard as ice with near vertical sides and back sides.
There is no real possibility of Carving these baby's! and the drop to the trough can be 2-3 feet. then it is another two yards of blue ice to the twin cousin from hell.

I can usually ski through these mine fields, but to say I skied them would be a stretch.

In these conditions I strongly adhear to the practice of maintaining concentration on the parts I want to ski on, and not the trough. I like the high line anyway. However, as I turn around the front side of a bump. and get greated by these "situations", apprehension builds rapidly. My self preservation reaction to reach back up and out of these things is only surpassed by my exclaimation of "Oh! Sh**!".

What is an old man to do???

Blame the boarders for the lousey bump shapes?
Submitt a grooming request to mountain operations, and let the games begin anew?
Just stay away, telling myself that "those grapes are sour"?
Seek professional help from a regestered mental health provider?
Obtain a "subscription" to an orthopedics and physical therapy organization to take care of the inevitable.
Tell everyone "I meant to do that"?

Is there a light in this tunnel?

CalG
post #2 of 7
Quote:
Originally posted by CalG:

In these conditions I strongly adhear to the practice of maintaining concentration on the parts I want to ski on, and not the trough. I like the high line anyway. ......

Is there a light in this tunnel?

CalG
Good thought, just add one more mantra. "Ice is my friend."

Seriously, turn where there is snow or on the high side. Use a completed turn to slow down and point in the next desired direction. When on ice, you know like everyone else, it is hard to change direction...so don't. Get ready to absorb the next upward section of the mogul(from hell) to turn completely on.

This might mean you are skiing two lines of moguls, not down the zipper line of one line of moguls. I saw a race coach do beautiful turns on the uphill slope of iced moguls, crossing into the next lane to hit the uphill slope of another mogul, then back again. He used the slope of the mogul(almost perpendicular to the slope of the hill) to turn on and maintain speed(or lack of). He shouted back....

"Ice is my friend".

Good luck. We can try this at Sugarbush.

[ February 21, 2003, 02:41 PM: Message edited by: KeeTov ]
post #3 of 7
Cal,

I tend to look at the bumps that we get here in the mid-atlantic very differently than the ones that are borne of good skiers in soft snow, that are knee high perfectly symetrical.

The bumps we get here are a lot like the ones you described. They tend to be walls on the front, soft near the top, and bullet-proof on the backs, sides and in the troughs.

I approach these runs more like a playground than a mogul field. I make no attempt to follow any pre-determined line or path down the hill. I play with the contours and bumps individually as I make my way down. The one thing I do try to do, is to approach the bumps from the side, then make the first third of the turn as I'm moving up the side of a bump. As I'm coming into the apex of the turn, I'll be on the softest snow. Most of the bumps seem to have vertical ridges down the backs of them. The ridges tend to be very pronounced, and sometimes, even sharp. Because of this, if you approach the bump from the side, and are facing down the fall line when you are on top, and make sure that vertical ridge is directly under your feet, you'll be able to set an edge into it, no matter how firm it is.

If the back of the bump has a drop off from people traversing across the back of it, you'll be able to either complete the turn before you fall off the back, or make a quick redirection the other way, and go down the far side of it, depending on what you see when you get to the top of it.

I hope there is something useful in there for you.
post #4 of 7
Real bumps? all bumps is real. What you are talking about is real interesting bumps. There are some good points in the few posts that we have on this thread. At 48, I am no spring chicken and I have to tell you that "Ice Is My Friend" in bumps. I like real bumps hard. Why? because its less work to turn and control line. Line and turn shape control speed.

First off I have my feet apart. There is no way to control line and turn shape with your feet close together. I also don't take the high line. That line requires to much absorption and extension.

Most skiers try to dictate to the bumps instead of the other way around. The bump you are approaching dictates everything, turn size, shape and timing. You don't determine one thing, you interpret. The bump you are approaching present a puzzle. Your job is to solve it. The bigger the bump, the more time you have to solve the puzzle. The bigger the bumps, the more you want to slow down your turn initiations and relax. Most skiers do the opposite and get clobbered. I ski em one bump at a time. I don't look very far ahead.

Learn a good turn and in my case that is what I call a bulldozer turn, then solve each puzzle and real bumps become a magical delight. I find real bumps to addicting because they are the best mind game I have ever played.
post #5 of 7
My apologies for dredging up old posts but I haven't been on this site very long and am still digging through the treasure chest of knowledge here. I have to say that Pierre's post says it all for me. When I'm out skiing the groomers, it isn't too long before I'm eyeing the moguls. For me the moguls are my puzzle and many times object of my profanity. Yet to be solved completely and maybe that's why they fascinate me so much. I've improved much more this year based on a lot of the posts here than I probably ever would have by just skiing them each time on my own. I've skiied the troughs the middles, the tops, the bottoms and each time I ski them I know that there is a lot I don't know about skiing bumps. So far the biggest revelation has been in the pulling back of my feet at the crest of the bump to help engage the tips on the backside. Huge benefit that manuever! Thanks for the tips.
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally posted by Pierre:
. Most skiers try to dictate to the bumps instead of the other way around. The bump you are approaching dictates everything, turn size, shape and timing. You don't determine one thing, you interpret. The bump you are approaching present a puzzle. Your job is to solve it.
Now this bit I sort of get.....
I have had people try to make me "turn on top of the bump" "turn on the side of the bump" "plant pole on top of bump" "plant pole in front of top of bump" etc etc etc... & it is all a miserable failure....

The only thing that works for me is my instructors exhortation to "turn & then keep turning" .... even those who gave most of the above directions for skiing bumps agree... I ski them best when I focus on nothing except not stopping turning... I still don't ski them well - but certainly better than with any other strategy... After trying a strategy we will talk about it & they say "OK show us what you normally do" - They will say straight away - that is heaps better - keep doing it... but if they ask what I do all I can say is "keep turning"

Mind you I see the photos of any of your bumps & think "I wish".... our bumps are usually things like the run my friend described as "an icy luge track" between trees & boulders - track made by a heap of people that never finish their turns & hence ghastly shape for speed control - a real challenge to find places to turn properly... any sort of regular arrangement of lumpy things is better than that....
post #7 of 7
After re-reading this I would only change the english that I used.

Photos of good skiers skiing bumps are very deceiving. The bumps in photos never look like the monsters encountered on the slopes. Every video taken of me skiing bumps looks as if I am on a groomer. Even in huge bumps, it looks like I am in flat easy bumps. When I look at those videos its not very convincing to me and I know how big the bumps were.
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